1. Remember the zine? Fans want you to, and here's how →

    cramprolls:

    Well hey, here’s a nice lil article on the Tampa Zine Library that we’re building!

  2. uispeccoll:

(Okay okay, I tested making sparkles.) 
RAWR RAWR!  Can you hear the tauntaun roar?
Star Wars Millennium 1 edited by Tracy Christensen from 1980.  This fanzine came to us through the Organization for Transformative Works.  See the Collection Guide.  My interpretation of the info in the table of contents is that Tracy Christensen did this amazing artwork as well.  Stop by to check out the REALLY fantastic Han and Leia artwork inside. 
"This maiden issue of Millennium is dedicated to Mr. George Lucas who made all our dreams come true."

Such a sucker for a library gif.

    uispeccoll:

    (Okay okay, I tested making sparkles.) 

    RAWR RAWR!  Can you hear the tauntaun roar?

    Star Wars Millennium 1 edited by Tracy Christensen from 1980.  This fanzine came to us through the Organization for Transformative Works.  See the Collection Guide.  My interpretation of the info in the table of contents is that Tracy Christensen did this amazing artwork as well.  Stop by to check out the REALLY fantastic Han and Leia artwork inside. 

    "This maiden issue of Millennium is dedicated to Mr. George Lucas who made all our dreams come true."

    Such a sucker for a library gif.

  3. zinepavilion:

Hold on! Just where is this Zine Pavilion anyway? Why it’s in Booth 2053, near the Graphic Novel and Gaming Stage, and Artist Alley! Come and say “Hi!”.

Also a front runner for coolest thing at ALA. (Maybe.)

    zinepavilion:

    Hold on! Just where is this Zine Pavilion anyway? Why it’s in Booth 2053, near the Graphic Novel and Gaming Stage, and Artist Alley! Come and say “Hi!”.

    Also a front runner for coolest thing at ALA. (Maybe.)

  4. uuuggghhhjp:

Thanks to all who sent me stuff for inclusion in the zine. If you sent me something, and I didn’t respond to your email, I apologize. I’m terrible with email. But I got it. I am including literally every single thing everyone has sent me, and there is still time to send me some more, or send me stuff you sat on and didn’t send yet! The goal is still to launch at ALA Annual in Chicago (end of June). I wanted to have a prerelease party at the NJLA conference in early June but I gave up that dream because I’ll never get it done in time.
Another goal is also to distribute the zine in all major ebook formats on librariesmakeshithappen.com. That’s a domain I’ve owned for two years and never used.
Thanks to all that contributed. Y’all make it happen. The attached photo here is the centerfold drawn by @sketchlibrarian; she also sketched a really great picture of Juicy J for inclusion as well, which I’m going to put in next to his quote:
“I was living in the hood, but I went to the library and I checked out music books. I just read that shit because I wanted to be in the music business. But I felt like, if I’m going to be in the music business, I got to know about the business. I knew I had talent; I was talented as fuck. I could DJ, I could make music, I could produce beats, I could rap. But I needed to know the business part. So I went to the library, checked out a bunch of books. Well I had my mom check me out books; I was young. I was 13. I had her check me out a bunch of books from the library and I just read almost like six or seven books. Then I would check the books back in, and I would check them back out for another two weeks just to read the same thing over and over again so I could understand it.”
- JP

Signal boost!

    uuuggghhhjp:

    Thanks to all who sent me stuff for inclusion in the zine. If you sent me something, and I didn’t respond to your email, I apologize. I’m terrible with email. But I got it.

    I am including literally every single thing everyone has sent me, and there is still time to send me some more, or send me stuff you sat on and didn’t send yet!

    The goal is still to launch at ALA Annual in Chicago (end of June). I wanted to have a prerelease party at the NJLA conference in early June but I gave up that dream because I’ll never get it done in time.

    Another goal is also to distribute the zine in all major ebook formats on librariesmakeshithappen.com. That’s a domain I’ve owned for two years and never used.

    Thanks to all that contributed. Y’all make it happen. The attached photo here is the centerfold drawn by @sketchlibrarian; she also sketched a really great picture of Juicy J for inclusion as well, which I’m going to put in next to his quote:

    I was living in the hood, but I went to the library and I checked out music books. I just read that shit because I wanted to be in the music business. But I felt like, if I’m going to be in the music business, I got to know about the business. I knew I had talent; I was talented as fuck. I could DJ, I could make music, I could produce beats, I could rap. But I needed to know the business part. So I went to the library, checked out a bunch of books. Well I had my mom check me out books; I was young. I was 13. I had her check me out a bunch of books from the library and I just read almost like six or seven books. Then I would check the books back in, and I would check them back out for another two weeks just to read the same thing over and over again so I could understand it.

    - JP

    Signal boost!

    (Source: makeithappenday)

  5. thepinakes:

zinepavilion:

Here’s another library themed zine that’s launching at ALA2013!Two Fisted Librarians is a collection of fiction, comics, and art created by you (hopefully!) concerning libraries and librarians. The deadline is April 30th.
They’re looking for stories that fondly recall the pulp magazines of the ’20s, ’30s, and ’40s, and comics of the ’40s and ’50s. Mad science, weird fantasy, occult horror, spicy mysteries, noirish romances, thrilling adventures, and whatever else. Want to write about a library that uses steampunk technology, a cataloguing system so obtuse that it drives those that try to use it insane, or a librarian who has to track down a Nazi zeppelin in order to get an overdue book? Go for it! Send them an email or check out the blog.

New fiction zine: “Two-fisted librarians.”

Grim and frightening.

    thepinakes:

    zinepavilion:

    Here’s another library themed zine that’s launching at ALA2013!

    Two Fisted Librarians is a collection of fiction, comics, and art created by you (hopefully!) concerning libraries and librarians. The deadline is April 30th.

    They’re looking for stories that fondly recall the pulp magazines of the ’20s, ’30s, and ’40s, and comics of the ’40s and ’50s. Mad science, weird fantasy, occult horror, spicy mysteries, noirish romances, thrilling adventures, and whatever else.

    Want to write about a library that uses steampunk technology, a cataloguing system so obtuse that it drives those that try to use it insane, or a librarian who has to track down a Nazi zeppelin in order to get an overdue book? Go for it! Send them an email or check out the blog.

    New fiction zine: “Two-fisted librarians.”

    Grim and frightening.

  6. thedanaash:

Because this conversation probably makes no sense (and is full of errors - JP makes it happen on a regular basis) allow me to explain: our own JP Porcaro and Amanda B are making a zine.
The goal is to have it ready by ALA conference, which starts June 27, with a pre-release at the NJLA conference in Atlantic City a few weeks before. We want millennial (born 1982-after) librarians (library students/recent grads, this means you too!) to be responsible for the content.Working Title: “We Are Here”There is no theme other than “by generation Y librarians”. 
If you want to submit anything (seriously, anything), get in touch with JP here before the end of next week. There are still roughly 16 pages left to fill, so there’s plenty of room to make it happen!

Zines! Tumblarians! Collaboration! Help make this fab, folks—submit!

    thedanaash:

    Because this conversation probably makes no sense (and is full of errors - JP makes it happen on a regular basis) allow me to explain: our own JP Porcaro and Amanda B are making a zine.

    The goal is to have it ready by ALA conference, which starts June 27, with a pre-release at the NJLA conference in Atlantic City a few weeks before. 

    We want millennial (born 1982-after) librarians (library students/recent grads, this means you too!) to be responsible for the content.

    Working Title: “We Are Here”

    There is no theme other than “by generation Y librarians”. 

    If you want to submit anything (seriously, anything), get in touch with JP here before the end of next week. There are still roughly 16 pages left to fill, so there’s plenty of room to make it happen!

    Zines! Tumblarians! Collaboration! Help make this fab, folks—submit!

  7. Zines at the ALA Annual

    kellymce:

    zinepavilion:

    The Zine Pavilion lives again! We are once again collecting zine donations for the American Library Association conference in Chicago. Fill out this Google Form and someone will get in touch with you. 

    Signal boost, plz? 

    We’re collecting zines for an exhibit, but also gonna have zine-making and some programming in the Zine Pavilion. Which was super rad last time, remember?

    Yes & yes.

  8. kellymce:

For today’s gratuitous pic of my library, an embarrassing/heartwarming sight: I filled the Zine Machine yesterday, and it is already looking sparse. 

If there was any doubt, Kelly is rocking this “intensely cool” librarian thing.

    kellymce:

    For today’s gratuitous pic of my library, an embarrassing/heartwarming sight: I filled the Zine Machine yesterday, and it is already looking sparse. 

    If there was any doubt, Kelly is rocking this “intensely cool” librarian thing.

  9. 2013 Zine Librarian’s (un)conference to take place in Iowa City

    kczinemachine:

    Stay tuned for the date…. 

    This July there will be a zine librarians (un)conference in Iowa City. With the destination being only a four hour drive from Kansas City,  this could be a worthwhile event for people interested in zine collections. 

    Past Conference workshops have included Information Literacy and Teaching with zines as well as Zines and Community Archives

    We will keep you updated when we know more information about the 2013 conference. 

  10. chealsye:

I’m making a digital zine library and need your help!
Check out my recent Wordpress post for more info and a bad pun, or view our call for submissions for some detailed info.
Photo: Colorado College Zine Collection CC-BY Colorado College Tutt Library

This is so awesome. Submit!

    chealsye:

    I’m making a digital zine library and need your help!

    Check out my recent Wordpress post for more info and a bad pun, or view our call for submissions for some detailed info.

    Photo: Colorado College Zine Collection CC-BY Colorado College Tutt Library

    This is so awesome. Submit!

  11. hclib:

    Gay Vue Magazine, 1971-1972

    Gay Vue was one of the earliest LGBT publications in Minneapolis.  Jack Baker was on the board of directors. Sherrie Buffington was co-editor.

    You can find Gay Vue and these other early LGBT publications (So’s Your Old Lady, Equal Time, GLC Voice) in the Special Collections Minneapolis periodicals collection. We also have an index to GLC Voice at Special Collections.

    The images above are from Volume I, number 2 of Gay Vue, 21 August, 1971.

    If you would like to see more early LGBT periodicals and Pride materials, please check out our display in the atrium of Minneapolis Central Library.

    This is so cool.

  12. Zines are an especially important medium for marginalized groups, providing a safe space to have an open discussion. With the so-called war on obesity in full swing, it’s no wonder that an increasing number of fat-activist and body-positive zines are appearing. Fat acceptance often intersects with subjects and interests like feminism, queer studies, social and political activism, history, health, fashion, and even pop culture. The zines reviewed here cover several areas, such as radical queer and transgender fat activism, fat activism history, DIY fat activism, body-positive art and poetry, and clothing design.

Cooper, Charlotte. A Queer and Trans Fat Activist Timeline. April 2011. 34p. ½ size. Distro: Free pdf and audio file. Paper copy sold out.Queer fat researcher Charlotte Cooper (Fat and Proud: The Politics of Size) made this collaborative zine after facilitating a 2010 NOLOSE workshop. At the workshop, she and other participants constructed a queer and transgender fat-activist community timeline by adding their histories and memories to it, and then Cooper turned the timeline into this zine. The physical timeline resides in Hamburg, Germany; copies are housed in several libraries and archives, with a pdf available online. Beginning with the 1967 Central Park Fat-In and ending with NOLOSE 2010, the timeline does a great job not only of presenting an overarching view of the history of the intersection of queer, trans, and fat activism, but also of delineating the issues that historically have been important to members of these groups.
Durden, Krissy. Figure 8. 2007. No. 4. 35p. ½ size. $2–3. Distros: Etsy | ThingsYouSayThe subtitle of this fourth issue, “Refuse to feel shame about your body!” succinctly yet powerfully conveys the raison d’être of body/fat-positive movements. The focus of this particular issue is profiling past and present fat activists, which Durden accomplishes through interviews, personal reflections, and guest contributions. A highlight is “Everyday Acts of Fat Activism,” which lists actions people can take to support themselves and others (e.g., “Write emails to fat bashing companies”). Another essay details the discriminatory treatment of fat people who wish to adopt children, in the United States and abroad. Durden includes innovative artwork by several interview subjects, including fat-girl anime by Sarah Perry and “fat maps” by Stina of the zine Chubbluv.
Hartman, Crystal. Fat Is Beautiful. March 2006. 43 p. ½ size. $3. Distro: The Mimi Zine DistroThis meticulously researched zine on fat acceptance and sizeism provides a plethora of scholarly and commonsense information disputing the popular claim that thinness=healthy and fatness=unhealthy. Hartman utilizes scientific literature to debunk prevailing health myths, e.g., “You can lose weight if you try hard enough” and “Being fat causes heart disease.” The zine includes a number of powerful pieces on combating fat oppression written by other authors. Among these are an excerpt from Nomy Lamm’s brilliant essay “It’s a Big Fat Revolution” and a 1975 article by Laurie Ann Lepoff describing the lack of support and solidarity for fat people in the lesbian community. Hartman makes librarians proud by including an extensive bibliography of recommended reading organized by subject.
Nicci. Fat Girl. 2010. No.15. 22 p. ¼ size. $2.20. Distros: EtsyThis zineaddresses what it’s like to be a fat girl, including the struggle with body image and other issues common among fat women in a sizeist society. Topics covered range from problems shopping for fashionable yet comfortable clothes, to being given a Diet Coke every time one asks for a regular Coke, to the tiring effort to deal with thin privilege. The result is a powerful zine that speaks to a range of experiences. In this issue, Nicci talks about the power the scale wields over many and reflects on her life until she started writing her zine. An artist as well as a writer, she includes body-positive illustrations along with letters and essays. She sums up her work: “FGis a validation, and a decree. FG is an attitude, and a reassurance—it is a battle cry.”
Adderley, Sage. FAT-TASTIC. Winter 2010. 14p. ½ size. $1. Distros: Etsy | SweetCandyThis compilation is a recent project by the zinester behind Sweet Candy Distro. Created as a textual safe space to share fat- and body-positive stories, reflections, and information, Adderley’s zine features artwork, poetry, and experiential pieces by seven contributors. One work that stands out is a poignant letter from Adderley to her body, in which she apologizes for hating it for so long and vows to treat it with love and respect going forward. The zine ends with a useful DIY tutorial for making “positive affirmation cards,” which are intended to foster traits such as strength and happiness in individuals and among friends. As of January 2012, Adderley is accepting submissions for the follow-up issue.

    Zines are an especially important medium for marginalized groups, providing a safe space to have an open discussion. With the so-called war on obesity in full swing, it’s no wonder that an increasing number of fat-activist and body-positive zines are appearing. Fat acceptance often intersects with subjects and interests like feminism, queer studies, social and political activism, history, health, fashion, and even pop culture. The zines reviewed here cover several areas, such as radical queer and transgender fat activism, fat activism history, DIY fat activism, body-positive art and poetry, and clothing design.

    Queer Transfat Activism Fat Activism and Body Positivity: Zines for Transforming the Status Quo

    Cooper, CharlotteA Queer and Trans Fat Activist Timeline. April 2011. 34p. ½ size. Distro: Free pdf and audio file. Paper copy sold out.
    Queer fat researcher Charlotte Cooper (Fat and Proud: The Politics of Size) made this collaborative zine after facilitating a 2010 NOLOSE workshop. At the workshop, she and other participants constructed a queer and transgender fat-activist community timeline by adding their histories and memories to it, and then Cooper turned the timeline into this zine. The physical timeline resides in Hamburg, Germany; copies are housed in several libraries and archives, with a pdf available online. Beginning with the 1967 Central Park Fat-In and ending with NOLOSE 2010, the timeline does a great job not only of presenting an overarching view of the history of the intersection of queer, trans, and fat activism, but also of delineating the issues that historically have been important to members of these groups.

    Durden, Krissy. Figure 8. 2007. No. 4. 35p. ½ size. $2–3. Distros: Etsy | ThingsYouSay
    The subtitle of this fourth issue, “Refuse to feel shame about your body!” succinctly yet powerfully conveys the raison d’être of body/fat-positive movements. The focus of this particular issue is profiling past and present fat activists, which Durden accomplishes through interviews, personal reflections, and guest contributions. A highlight is “Everyday Acts of Fat Activism,” which lists actions people can take to support themselves and others (e.g., “Write emails to fat bashing companies”). Another essay details the discriminatory treatment of fat people who wish to adopt children, in the United States and abroad. Durden includes innovative artwork by several interview subjects, including fat-girl anime by Sarah Perry and “fat maps” by Stina of the zine Chubbluv.

    Hartman, Crystal. Fat Is Beautiful. March 2006. 43 p. ½ size. $3. Distro: The Mimi Zine Distro
    This meticulously researched zine on fat acceptance and sizeism provides a plethora of scholarly and commonsense information disputing the popular claim that thinness=healthy and fatness=unhealthy. Hartman utilizes scientific literature to debunk prevailing health myths, e.g., “You can lose weight if you try hard enough” and “Being fat causes heart disease.” The zine includes a number of powerful pieces on combating fat oppression written by other authors. Among these are an excerpt from Nomy Lamm’s brilliant essay “It’s a Big Fat Revolution” and a 1975 article by Laurie Ann Lepoff describing the lack of support and solidarity for fat people in the lesbian community. Hartman makes librarians proud by including an extensive bibliography of recommended reading organized by subject.

    Nicci. Fat Girl. 2010. No.15. 22 p. ¼ size. $2.20. Distros: Etsy
    This zineaddresses what it’s like to be a fat girl, including the struggle with body image and other issues common among fat women in a sizeist society. Topics covered range from problems shopping for fashionable yet comfortable clothes, to being given a Diet Coke every time one asks for a regular Coke, to the tiring effort to deal with thin privilege. The result is a powerful zine that speaks to a range of experiences. In this issue, Nicci talks about the power the scale wields over many and reflects on her life until she started writing her zine. An artist as well as a writer, she includes body-positive illustrations along with letters and essays. She sums up her work: “FGis a validation, and a decree. FG is an attitude, and a reassurance—it is a battle cry.”

    Adderley, Sage. FAT-TASTIC. Winter 2010. 14p. ½ size. $1. Distros: Etsy | SweetCandy
    This compilation is a recent project by the zinester behind Sweet Candy Distro. Created as a textual safe space to share fat- and body-positive stories, reflections, and information, Adderley’s zine features artwork, poetry, and experiential pieces by seven contributors. One work that stands out is a poignant letter from Adderley to her body, in which she apologizes for hating it for so long and vows to treat it with love and respect going forward. The zine ends with a useful DIY tutorial for making “positive affirmation cards,” which are intended to foster traits such as strength and happiness in individuals and among friends. As of January 2012, Adderley is accepting submissions for the follow-up issue.

  13. As Book Review Editor Heather McCormack said today on Twitter: “This deserves the award for cutest photo ever featuring zine librarians (Jacksonville PL) and….Kathleen Hanna!”

    As Book Review Editor Heather McCormack said today on Twitter: “This deserves the award for cutest photo ever featuring zine librarians (Jacksonville PL) and….Kathleen Hanna!”