1. Indeed, the biggest advantage of social media is the ability to have conversations with patrons and visitors even when they are not physically in the library.

    — 

    Is Social Media An Effective Marketing Tool for Public Libraries? 

    My office job requires talking to a lot of different libraries about their events, a lot of whom say things like “well we have a sign up sheet and that is good enough and nobody comes out anyway etc”. And we do that at my library job too, but in doing so we’re ignoring all of those people who don’t step foot into the library. We’re having a magic workshop next week, and the sign up sheet had two or three names on it until we sent fliers to the schools to get the word out. Now I’m getting calls all of the time from interested people who want to sign up. I can only imagine what would happen if we put it out on the internet. What a revelation.

    It’s just no wonder nobody shows up to anything if your only method of bringing people in is a sign up sheet. It’s so important we go out and market ourselves, physically, virtually, whatever, as long as it’s outside of the library.

    (via thedanaash)

  2. Bathtubs + Books + Neil Gaiman = Tumblr?

    bathbookneil:

    boneidlehands submitted:

    Neil Birthday Bath Book Pyjama Party!

    Ain’t no party like a Neil party.

    Apparently there is an ENTIRE TUMBLR dedicated just to PEOPLE READING NEIL GAIMAN BOOKS IN THE BATHTUB. I never cease to be amazed by the internet.

  3. laughingsquid:

Happy 30th birthday, emoticons! *

¯\_(*o*)_/¯
The asterisk is important—click through for a truer, lengthier history of the emoticon, though I am sad they didn’t include Ambrose Bierce!

    laughingsquid:

    Happy 30th birthday, emoticons! *

    ¯\_(*o*)_/¯

    The asterisk is important—click through for a truer, lengthier history of the emoticon, though I am sad they didn’t include Ambrose Bierce!

  4. pith:

    All of the wonderful people, in one wonderful post.

    Brooklyn Book Festival Bookends Opening Night Party

    What a wonderful party! Last night your Library Journal tumblrer met missrumphiusprojectkelsfjord of New Directions, and harperbooks aka kratlee (who I actually called “kratlee”). Of course I also shimmied with Rachel. It was so much internet in the flesh. More Tumblr more of the time!

  5. youtastelikenachos:

Ladies and gentlemen, we are librarian tumblr meeting up with @dsransom (Taken with Instagram)

A bunch of tumblrarians hung out together in Brooklyn today and yes, you should be jealous.

    youtastelikenachos:

    Ladies and gentlemen, we are librarian tumblr meeting up with @dsransom (Taken with Instagram)

    A bunch of tumblrarians hung out together in Brooklyn today and yes, you should be jealous.

  6. Librarian Potluck Picnic, Brooklyn →

    thepinakes:

    Follow-up to my save-the-date post — there’s now a Facebook Event for the upcoming Librarian Potluck Picnic in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, July 28. We’ll gather at high noon. Come out and join us — even if you aren’t a librarian! I am 100% certain it will be a good time.

    If you’re not on Facebook, just drop me a message and I’ll make sure you’re kept up-to-date with the exact locale.

    RSVP»>

    Random additional thoughts: after the picnic, I’d be interesting in visiting the nearby majestic Brooklyn Public Library.

    And now! Facebook information!

  7. the pinakes: Tumblarians of the East Coast! →

    thepinakes:

    I’m traveling this summer and will be in Boston and New York. Therefore, there are two things are coming up:

    • Saturday night, July 21: Librarian meet-up in Boston (or Cambridge), being organized by @MrsFridayNext.
    • Saturday, July 28: Librarian picnic, Prospect Park, Brooklyn, being organized by@BibliosaurusRex and someone who tastes like nachos.

    Exact details — time, location, etc — are forthcoming. For now, pull out your calendar and an indelible marker and mark yourself busy.

    ETA: You don’t actually have to be a librarian to attend. Main criteria is if you’re cool. You’re cool, right? Yes. See you there.

    See some of you in Brooklyn? If I pass the cool test, that is.

  8. rachelfershleiser:

darienlibrary:

Internet Launch at the Library! 1996. And now we have a tumblr.
(via Darien Library’s flickr stream)

Librarians on Tumblr are my everything.

    rachelfershleiser:

    darienlibrary:

    Internet Launch at the Library! 1996. And now we have a tumblr.

    (via Darien Library’s flickr stream)

    Librarians on Tumblr are my everything.

  9. OnePager template for library websites →

    thecardiganlibrarian:

    jcowles:

    This is *awesome* for small libraries, and a vast improvement over what many currently have.  Check it out!

    This is really, really cool.

  10. theatlantic:

Finally, a Google for Grandma
Internet usage, studies have suggested, can improve older people’s mental and emotional wellbeing. And yet, for many seniors, the shiny machines sitting on their kids’ or grandkids’ desks (or in their hands, or on their laps) are just that — machines, foreign and cold. Nearly 80% of all Americans, Pew says — and nearly 80% of all baby boomers — use the Internet; only 42% of seniors do.
The digital divide, in other words, has a corollary: the generational divide. […]
So it’s both ironic and fitting that the young company that made its name simplifying the web is now trying to bring that simplicity to the web’s oldest users. In a pilot program at its Dublin offices, Google has rolled out classes that pair up older people with (generally, much younger) Googlers, providing instruction on everything from email-sending to photo-uploading to searching for information to, in general, navigating a not-always-intuitive Internet.
Read more. [Image: Cambridge Community Television]

    theatlantic:

    Finally, a Google for Grandma

    Internet usage, studies have suggested, can improve older people’s mental and emotional wellbeing. And yet, for many seniors, the shiny machines sitting on their kids’ or grandkids’ desks (or in their hands, or on their laps) are just that — machines, foreign and cold. Nearly 80% of all Americans, Pew says — and nearly 80% of all baby boomers — use the Internet; only 42% of seniors do.

    The digital divide, in other words, has a corollary: the generational divide. […]

    So it’s both ironic and fitting that the young company that made its name simplifying the web is now trying to bring that simplicity to the web’s oldest users. In a pilot program at its Dublin offices, Google has rolled out classes that pair up older people with (generally, much younger) Googlers, providing instruction on everything from email-sending to photo-uploading to searching for information to, in general, navigating a not-always-intuitive Internet.

    Read more. [Image: Cambridge Community Television]

  11. libraryadvocates:

Fascinating.

Yes.

    libraryadvocates:

    Fascinating.

    Yes.

  12. All librarians now rely on software to do our jobs, whether or not we are programmers,” Ms. Goldman said. “Most libraries don’t have an I.T. staff to set up a server and build you a Web site, so if you want that stuff done, you have to do it yourself.

    — A Surge in Learning the Language of the Internet - NYTimes.com (via appsandstacks)

  13. The Internet has been amazing for book talk. There is more of it, and at a higher quality, than perhaps at any other moment, certainly in my lifetime. Dinosaurs love to lament the lost space in newspaper book reviews; a few years ago, the National Book Critics Circle fought, what seemed to me, a self-serving campaign to save the book review, by which a handful of people really wanted to save their right to sell the same lame 450-word book report to a handful of regional dailies. You didn’t have to bother reading the book to write many of those reviews, and as a one-time daily books editor myself, who once assigned reviews to some of those active in this debate, it was clear that many critics did not. Now we have the Rumpus and the Awl and The Millions and the Morning News and Maud Newton and Bookslut and the Nervous Breakdown and Full-Stop and the Los Angeles Review of Books and HTMLgiant and you get the idea. Professional freelancers didn’t save the book review – the battle was won by the Internet and people who love reading. The culture is richer for it.

    — 

    Dave Daley

    Thanks for the shout!

    (via millionsmillions)

  14. A Sign of the Times: Encyclopaedia Britannica to End Its Print Run →

  15. What I mostly see in the library blogosphere is a mix of celebration of our professional values in a less-than-substantial way; celebration of our pop culture presence; demonstration of our interest in pop culture; a rather immature obsession with our image in the culture; and general personal blogging under the heading of “librarian.” Because the library blogosphere has nearly replaced the reading of journals for most younger librarians, this content has to be seen as the material that now constitutes the self-conception of librarianship for the librarians who read it, education and work responsibilities aside, for ourselves and before the public. As a result of the interests of library bloggers, in a postmodern transformation, the profession of librarianship is being replaced by the signifier of librarianship. The implication for the problem of deprofessionalization is that the library blogosphere is unwittingly abetting it. The claim to professional expertise is slipping through our fingers, replaced by a mere claim to a cultural identity. A claim to a cultural identity doesn’t constitute a claim to professional autonomy, and professional autonomy is what is needed in order to advance the goals of the profession that we all celebrate.

    — 

    Deprofessionalization and the library blogosphere

    Contentious advice from Rory Litwin of Library Juice Press? He also adds that “the ‘librarian identity’ is a matter of expertise rather than something to do with Catwoman”. Ouch.

    I think the trouble is that we often see librarianship as more than a profession – we see it as a vocation, an ethos, a way of life. It becomes tempting to fly the librarian flag in every aspect of our lives but maybe we just shouldn’t. Maybe we should stop being knitting librarians, cycling librarians, gin-drinking librarians, rock-climbing librarians, cake-baking librarians, indie librarians, cyberpunk bounty hunter librarians and just be librarians.

    (via dots-loops)

    Has “the reading of journals” really disappeared in younger librarians? Part of me feels like this argument is curmudgeonly, Franzen-esque—hating on the online (& primarily young) librarian community because it feel good rather than because it makes sense. I mean, if there really is a correlation between an increased participation in an online librarian communication and a decrease in on-the-job professionalism or preparedness, then this is a valid complaint. I just have no idea if that correlation exists, and I suspect it doesn’t. Long story short, if you feel like you aren’t reading enough professional journals, subscribe to LJ. You can still follow us on tumblr, too, I promise.