1. cloudunbound:

    Best-selling author Neil Gaiman recounts his at-first rocky relationship with the interwebs, which led to progressive (and, as it turned out, brilliant) experiments with offering American Gods for free online. Piracy led to discovery; person-to-person book loans the same.

    "You can’t look at it as a lost sale. You are advertising." 

    This is exactly the benefit libraries offer (but they always pay for the content, mind!). Thank you, Mr. Gaiman.

  2. Belying the stereotype that younger Americans completely eschew print for digital, those ages 16-29 have wide-ranging media and technology behaviors that straddle the traditional paper-based world of books and digital access to information.

    — 

    Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project (via jasonwdean)

    Holla!

  3. wordtraffic:


theoreticalgirl:

librarylinknj:

It’s not about the stuff, it’s about the things you DO with the stuff. See also: Makerspaces, the point of.

Disagree with “building apps”, which can do a lot of things. Mostly this list has a problem with content development, and I don’t understand why.

^ And here is why I love Tumblr. Good points. And a shining example of why I need to remind myself to look past our collective professional navel more often than I do.
I looked at (and liked) this graphic from the POV of how to stress importance of column A to people who don’t “get” tech— which will be a challenge for me over the next few months. But that this reads as dismissive (and I see it—“WRONG”) is troubling, no? There’s lots of value in column A. B is a framework I need to allow A to happen, but we maybe shouldn’t be dismissive of A as outcome. Content IS important.
Teachable moment. Thank you!


I love cross-community discussions like, so, so much.

    wordtraffic:

    theoreticalgirl:

    librarylinknj:

    It’s not about the stuff, it’s about the things you DO with the stuff. See also: Makerspaces, the point of.

    Disagree with “building apps”, which can do a lot of things. Mostly this list has a problem with content development, and I don’t understand why.

    ^ And here is why I love Tumblr. Good points. And a shining example of why I need to remind myself to look past our collective professional navel more often than I do.

    I looked at (and liked) this graphic from the POV of how to stress importance of column A to people who don’t “get” tech— which will be a challenge for me over the next few months. But that this reads as dismissive (and I see it—“WRONG”) is troubling, no? There’s lots of value in column A. B is a framework I need to allow A to happen, but we maybe shouldn’t be dismissive of A as outcome. Content IS important.

    Teachable moment. Thank you!

    I love cross-community discussions like, so, so much.

    (Source: ittakesalibrary)

  4. cloudunbound:

Pew Internet released its latest report yesterday focusing on “younger Americans” (ages 16-29), and librarians are abuzz about their lingering connection with print and traditional services.
Some much-cited stats from the report:
75% of Americans ages 16-29 read at least one book in print in the past year
25% read at least one e-book
14% listened to at least one audiobook
But as the above chart shows, 54 percent of that same demographic wants libraries to offer a “broader selection of ebooks.” An issue in their reading ebooks may be that most ebook collections are heavily skewed toward adults.
Of course, a huge obstacle in intelligently collecting ebooks for younger readers is the metadata: the publisher-assigned BISAC codes label everything as “juvenile,” when librarians make distinctions among content for children (ages 0-7), juveniles (ages 8-12), and young adults (ages 13-18). Searching for and discovering just the right stuff is a slog, in other words, and that’s why I take great pains in my marketing to identify what is good for who and why.
More later on this massively crucial topic. 

    cloudunbound:

    Pew Internet released its latest report yesterday focusing on “younger Americans” (ages 16-29), and librarians are abuzz about their lingering connection with print and traditional services.

    Some much-cited stats from the report:

    • 75% of Americans ages 16-29 read at least one book in print in the past year
    • 25% read at least one e-book
    • 14% listened to at least one audiobook

    But as the above chart shows, 54 percent of that same demographic wants libraries to offer a “broader selection of ebooks.” An issue in their reading ebooks may be that most ebook collections are heavily skewed toward adults.

    Of course, a huge obstacle in intelligently collecting ebooks for younger readers is the metadata: the publisher-assigned BISAC codes label everything as “juvenile,” when librarians make distinctions among content for children (ages 0-7), juveniles (ages 8-12), and young adults (ages 13-18). Searching for and discovering just the right stuff is a slog, in other words, and that’s why I take great pains in my marketing to identify what is good for who and why.

    More later on this massively crucial topic. 

  5. p.s. To any non-librarian readers: Libraries complete destroy your check-out records on purpose so that the government can’t ask us for it. Just FYI.

    — 

    Reasonable Expectation of Privacy, the NSA, and the value of metadata | Pegasus Librarian

    This last line isn’t directed at librarians, but it is a key fact. But the idea that metadata isn’t private, and as such libraries should get better metadata from publishers is interesting (and should be given a try).

    (via chrischelberg)

  6. We believe that if you buy it, you own it, you’re able to do with it what you want.

    — 

    Andrew House, president and Group CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment, affirming the core principle of the Owners Rights Initiative.

    -“If you buy it, you own it”: Sony CEO Andrew House tells all about PlayStation 4 | Plugged In - Yahoo! News UK

    (via arlpolicynotes)

  7. LIBRARY FOR ALL: a digital library for the developing world by Library For All — Kickstarter

    The library brings together content from Open Source providers and top global publishers. It is designed for low-bandwidth environments through the use of a local network topology. The platform is designed to be device agnostic. That means it can be accessed via mobile phones, e-readers or even low-cost tablets.

    I met the nice people of Library for All at BEA on Friday. Check out all the cool things they are doing!

  8. What Governmental Big Data May Mean For Libraries | Library Journal

On May 9, President Obama signed an open data executive order and released an open data policy. Only a couple of weeks later, on May 22, Data.gov responded by launching a new  data catalog on an open source data management system called CKAN, which, the site says, will enable the central implementation of the Open Data Policy, as it will harvest the data inventories that federal agencies will be creating under the directive. “We also released new tools on Project Open Data that will help agencies easily meet the requirement of the policy, while laying the foundation for the new Data.gov infrastructure across government,” the statement continued.

Image pairing courtesy of LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro.)

    What Governmental Big Data May Mean For Libraries | Library Journal

    On May 9, President Obama signed an open data executive order and released an open data policy. Only a couple of weeks later, on May 22, Data.gov responded by launching a new  data catalog on an open source data management system called CKAN, which, the site says, will enable the central implementation of the Open Data Policy, as it will harvest the data inventories that federal agencies will be creating under the directive. “We also released new tools on Project Open Data that will help agencies easily meet the requirement of the policy, while laying the foundation for the new Data.gov infrastructure across government,” the statement continued.

    Image pairing courtesy of LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro.)

    (Source: Flickr / jdhancock)

  9. What does a personal digital library look like?

  10. libraryadvocates:

How libraries are evolving in the new digital realm
As concepts like self-publishing and digitized materials come to the forefront, how are libraries evolving in the new book world? In the new American Libraries digital supplement Digital Content: What’s Next?, leading library practitioners and experts discuss promises and “Faustian bargains” of ebooks.

Love this illustration! Murnau!

    libraryadvocates:

    How libraries are evolving in the new digital realm

    As concepts like self-publishing and digitized materials come to the forefront, how are libraries evolving in the new book world? In the new American Libraries digital supplement Digital Content: What’s Next?, leading library practitioners and experts discuss promises and “Faustian bargains” of ebooks.

    Love this illustration! Murnau!

  11. Digital technologies create new opportunities for accelerating, expanding, and individualizing learning. Our members and students are already actively engaged in building the schools and campuses of the future—including quality online communities. Increasingly, teachers, faculty, and staff are becoming curriculum designers who orchestrate the delivery of content using multiple instructional methods and technologies both within and beyond the traditional instructional day. Teaching and learning can now occur beyond the limitations of time and space. NEA embraces this new environment and these new technologies to better prepare our students for college and for 21st century careers.

    — NEA - NEA Policy Statement on Digital Learning (via infoneer-pulse)

  12. Visualizing Library Statistics | LJ INFOdocket


Here’s the second interactive data visualization in our new library data visualization series that we began last week using the database and interactive visualization technology from Data-Planet.
You’re looking at a static image of an interactive graphic (with more data) that you can access by either clicking the image or by clicking this link.
The chart provides a look at library’s Internet computers [personal computers (PCs) and laptops], whether purchased, leased, or donated, used by the general public in the library from 1998-2010.

    Visualizing Library Statistics | LJ INFOdocket

    Here’s the second interactive data visualization in our new library data visualization series that we began last week using the database and interactive visualization technology from Data-Planet.

    You’re looking at a static image of an interactive graphic (with more data) that you can access by either clicking the image or by clicking this link.

    The chart provides a look at library’s Internet computers [personal computers (PCs) and laptops], whether purchased, leased, or donated, used by the general public in the library from 1998-2010.

  13. the pinakes: Among scientists, however, just over half rated the gateway and... →

    Among scientists, however, just over half rated the gateway and archival role as very important, and even smaller shares rated other roles as very important. Over a quarter of scientists agreed strongly “because faculty have easy access to academic content online, the role librarians play at this institution is becoming much less important” (compared to about 20 percent overall).

    Ithaka Survey: Humanities Faculty Love the Library; Scientists Less Enthusiastic | Meredith Schwartz, Library Journal

    But some researchers are now raising the alarm about what they see as the proliferation of online journals that will print seemingly anything for a fee. They warn that nonexperts doing online research will have trouble distinguishing credible research from junk. “Most people don’t know the journal universe,” Dr. Goodman said. “They will not know from a journal’s title if it is for real or not.” 

    For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia | Gina Kolata, New York Times

    These two quotes, posted consecutively by the Infoneer Pulse, raise my hackles: on one hand, science faculty are increasingly dismissive of librarians due to the fact they can get content so easily online*, while simultaneously, scientists are becoming increasingly flummoxed and confused by the preponderance of predatory online journals. You know who’s good at sniffing out predatory journals? Librarians. Maybe the science faculty cited in the first quote ought to check with their librarians in order to avoid becoming entangled with fake journals, as described in the second.

    Personally, I feel very fortunate that I’ve been able to forge strong working relationships with my science faculty, but I benefit from working at a small university where I get to know them all by name.

    *This seems to neglect that they can often get that content so easily online because of their library’s budget and the time of the librarians who fine-tune the link resolvers.

  14. cloudunbound:

This morning via Sarah Weinman, I found out about Thin Reads, a free site devoted to tracking e-singles, which founder Howard Polskin defines as “a work of fiction nonfiction between 5,000 and 25,000 words, generally priced between $0.99 and $2.99,” per Laura Hazard Owen’s reporting at paidContent.
This could potentially be a great tool for conducting collection development, though I am surprised at the higher ratio of nonfiction to fiction. I had the sense that romance was hot on the heels of short-form journalism.

    cloudunbound:

    This morning via Sarah Weinman, I found out about Thin Reads, a free site devoted to tracking e-singles, which founder Howard Polskin defines as “a work of fiction nonfiction between 5,000 and 25,000 words, generally priced between $0.99 and $2.99,” per Laura Hazard Owen’s reporting at paidContent.

    This could potentially be a great tool for conducting collection development, though I am surprised at the higher ratio of nonfiction to fiction. I had the sense that romance was hot on the heels of short-form journalism.

  15. iworkatapubliclibrary:

On white board.

    iworkatapubliclibrary:

    On white board.