1. I’m increasingly concerned about my online presence. I was recently interviewed about my first book, and the reporter asked me if I thought that tweeting about shoes or using lots of exclamation marks would make it easier for the press or the scholarly community to write me off. (Interestingly, while there are many women in the academy studying Internet culture, the technology pundits featured on NPR and in The Atlantic are almost always male.) The answer to that is, yes, it probably does. I’d like to think my work speaks for itself, but research shows that women are judged much more harshly for frivolous public peccadillos than men are for, say, tweeting about sports. The obvious solution is having two Twitter accounts, but something about separating my life so neatly (interesting and boring; gendered feminine and gendered masculine; personal and academic) really rankles.

    — 

    Alice E. Marwick - "In Defense of Getting Personal on Twitter" The Chronicle of Higher Education

    I’ve thought about this a lot, particularly in the context of the bifurcation of self. This is what my partner, who is a high school teacher, does. He has a “real” and “clean” social media presence under his name, and a pseudonymous one that he uses for interactions with friends and family.

    But I have a bit more flexibility, and I simply don’t want to work with people who have a problem with my personal interests in thinks like whiskey, wine, cats, or fanfiction.  

    That is not to say that I don’t think that I participate in internet culture with abandon, or don’t occasionally angst about where that line of appropriate is. But I don’t like to self-censor to a degree where what I say is sanitized.

    Warwick continues: “On social media, we experience what Internet researchers call “context collapse,” in that all these facets are flattened into one. We are taxed with trying to perform appropriately to distinct audiences who expect different things from us. Often, this creates a “lowest common denominator” effect in which we stick with the staid and boring so as not to offend anyone. This is compounded in an extremely competitive job market in which any excuse is used to weed out candidates.” 

    I think context collapse can be a good thing; I know that my “real world” interests and dedication to causes has helped me more than it has hurt me. At least so far…

    Tumblarians, what do you think? 

    (via mollyiswrappedupinbooks)

    Librarians, do you experience this dichotomy between your public and private selves when you’re online?

    (Source: mollymwetta)

  2. How social media can be long form - Google Slides →

    librarylinknj:

    Kat Chow, from nprcodeswitch & Today in 1963, on using social media for long form projects. Long form doesn’t have to be just for journalism — there are lots of ways for libraries to use these strategies and ideas to develop & promote long-term projects and conversations.

    Bonus: a sneak peak at the Google Docs & Spreadsheets Kat uses to keep track of everything. I know we are not the only tumblarians who geek out over spreadsheets.

    Double bonus: Kat’s notes on how she used Twitter & Google Docs to build community & a great booklist.

    I definitely recommend checking out NPR’s socialmediadesk, run by Mel Kramer (who you may recall as the original voice of nprfreshair) and her colleague, Wright, whose surname is as yet unknown to me.

  3. Library’s ‘shelfies’ put witty twist on social media photos →

    Books pose for a "group shelfie" in the Main Library's Culture & AV Division. This is just one of the "shelfies" the Akron library has posted on social media recently. (Courtesy Akron-Summit County Public Library via Akron Beacon Journal/MCT)

    Books pose for a “group shelfie” in the Main Library’s Culture & AV Division. This is just one of the “shelfies” the Akron library has posted on social media recently. (Courtesy Akron-Summit County Public Library via Akron Beacon Journal/MCT)

    What do you get when bookshelves pose for a picture?

    A group shelfie, of course.

    Go ahead and groan, but give the Akron-Summit County Public Library credit for a pretty good visual pun.

    For the last few weeks, the Ohio library has been coaxing smiles from its social media followers with its “shelfies,” cleverly planned photos of books and other materials on its shelves. The pictures have included a shelfie of Devo videos in memory of band member Bob Casale; a roundup of Richard Simmons exercise videos as an antidote for the indulgences of Fat Tuesday; and the aforementioned group shot, a witty picture of rows of shelves at the Main Library, sunlight streaming from a window to give the photo some ironically misplaced gravitas.

    The concept is, of course, a less narcissistic twist on selfies, self-portraits that have become a staple on social media sites.

    Michael Derr, the overseer of the library system’s social media efforts and a committed foodie, had seen cookbook shelfies on food sites and thought the concept might work well for the library. He started posting the photos in mid-February on the library’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram sites.

  4. Bullock noted that Twitter has a short lifespan, which is important to keep in mind when posting time-sensitive information. Housing Works uses Twitter sporadically before and during events. Tumblr, she said, is a very easy-to-use blogging platform with a visual component that seems to draw a younger audience. Tumblr has a large book community and users post quotes, fan art, and GIFs of books they like. Housing Works’ smallest audience is on Facebook, and it seems to be used primarily by the store’s older customers. The store is also on Foursquare, which acts as great advertising, said Bullock, who is able to run specials through the site.

    Housing Works has the most followers on Tumblr, which Bullock credits to the fact that it’s the site she most enjoys using. She encouraged other booksellers to use their favorite sites as well, “because that will be reflected in your content,” she said. “There’s this pressure to be on everything, but you have to know what works best for you and for your store.”

    Though social media can be a great marketing tool, “you don’t want to be too billboard-y,” said Bullock, adding that it’s more beneficial if customers get to know the store on a personal level. In addition to promoting events, Bullock is focused on using social media to build relationships with other stores, authors, and publishers, as well as to grow the online community of book nerds that follows Housing Works, which she has labeled “The Bookternet.”

    — 

    Wi9 Spotlight: Making the Most of Social Media | American Booksellers Association (via rachelfershleiser)

    Actually, this is also  good advice for libraries using social media.

  5. No Such Thing As Too Many Cat Pictures: Q&A With Amanda Brennan | The Digital Shift 2013 →

    At The Digital Shift: Reinventing Libraries virtual event, held by Library Journal and School Library Journal on October 16, Know Your Meme‘s resident librarian, Amanda Brennan, offered her thoughts on how libraries can use memes to engage their patrons and boost their followings on platforms like Twitter and Facebook. We revisited that presentation, and picked Brennan’s brain on some other points, in a Q&A that offers some pointers for beginners looking to make their library’s Facebook page a must read.

    image

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  6. New York Comic Con Tweets From Attendees' Accounts Without Permission →

    continuants:

    vorpalsamovar:

    wilwheaton:

    Fans, celebrities and press attending New York Comic Con on Thursday sent out laudatory tweets expressing excitement to be at the annual convention — or at least it looked like they did, as the tweets were published entirely without their permission or knowledge. The tweets were tied to attendees’ NYCC badges. This year, conference organizers Reedpop allowed people to pre-register their badges online. The badges have radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips that are tied to a user’s identity in order to curb counterfeits. (RFID chips use radio frequencies to transfer information between the chip and a receiver.)

    Attendees were then invited to connect their social-media accounts to their badge, although it wasn’t explicitly stated that NYCC could post to Facebook or Twitter on their behalf.

    As people checked in to the convention on Thursday, many published tweets looked authentic (and were written in conversational language), but were not written by attendees.

    Someone better get fired for this.

    What the fucking, fuck. That’s fucked up, also why I never link my accounts online.

    Oh damn. This is not cool.

    Big Brother just got bigger.

  7. Social media is not going away. As new platforms emerge, libraries will need to choose the channels that work for their communities. But whatever platforms they choose, they must have some kind of plan that outlines their goals and embrace philosophies that support interactivity with their communities. I think Bizzle summed it up best, “Successful libraries will determine what platforms most effectively reach their target audience and aggressively build sustainable presences there.”

    — 

    Social Media: Libraries Are Posting, but Is Anyone Listening?

    This is about Facebook but its still very good.

  8. networkedlibrary:

Finals is to library as Easter is to church: finals is when you see students that only come to the library once a semester.
We use Hootsuite Pro to manage our social media accounts, and I use it to generate a really basic weekly sentiment analysis report that tells us what kinds of language people are using when they tweet about us. Real sentiment analysis is a very difficult thing to do well, and involves setting up your own taxonomies, training your software to categorize relevant phrases accurately, etc etc. So I take Hootsuite’s sentiment analysis with a grain of salt. However, there does seem to be a clear trend: during finals, students vent on Twitter. And when they vent, it often involves talking smack about the library. This comparison shows typical sentiment for finals, when students say things like, “I’m going to jump off the roof of the library! #finals #killme.”
I guess it’s good our humiliation/shame numbers are still low?

    networkedlibrary:

    Finals is to library as Easter is to church: finals is when you see students that only come to the library once a semester.

    We use Hootsuite Pro to manage our social media accounts, and I use it to generate a really basic weekly sentiment analysis report that tells us what kinds of language people are using when they tweet about us. Real sentiment analysis is a very difficult thing to do well, and involves setting up your own taxonomies, training your software to categorize relevant phrases accurately, etc etc. So I take Hootsuite’s sentiment analysis with a grain of salt. However, there does seem to be a clear trend: during finals, students vent on Twitter. And when they vent, it often involves talking smack about the library. This comparison shows typical sentiment for finals, when students say things like, “I’m going to jump off the roof of the library! #finals #killme.”

    I guess it’s good our humiliation/shame numbers are still low?

    (Source: libraryvisualization)

  9. Indeed, the biggest advantage of social media is the ability to have conversations with patrons and visitors even when they are not physically in the library.

    — 

    Is Social Media An Effective Marketing Tool for Public Libraries? 

    My office job requires talking to a lot of different libraries about their events, a lot of whom say things like “well we have a sign up sheet and that is good enough and nobody comes out anyway etc”. And we do that at my library job too, but in doing so we’re ignoring all of those people who don’t step foot into the library. We’re having a magic workshop next week, and the sign up sheet had two or three names on it until we sent fliers to the schools to get the word out. Now I’m getting calls all of the time from interested people who want to sign up. I can only imagine what would happen if we put it out on the internet. What a revelation.

    It’s just no wonder nobody shows up to anything if your only method of bringing people in is a sign up sheet. It’s so important we go out and market ourselves, physically, virtually, whatever, as long as it’s outside of the library.

    (via thedanaash)

  10. There’s a growing group of us who are passionate about literature and web culture. I call that The Bookternet, and they’re my favorite people.

    — 

    Book-Jobs Not by the Book: Rachel Fershleiser of Tumblr

    <3 <3 <3

  11. We decided that a daily campaign that spotlights a different eBook every day would effectively grab patrons’ attention and provide much –needed readers’ advisory; we dubbed our campaign, “eBook of the Day.”

    — A great post from Tumblrarian gobstacked on the Overdrive website!

  12. darienlibrary:

I’ve started leaving Foursquare tips around town from the Library’s account. How would you like to eat at a restaurant and then see what dish your local librarian recommends hmmm?

The Darien Library is everywhere on the internet and maybe also in real life. At your farmer&#8217;s market. In your supermarket cheese aisle. Ordering dumplings at the Thai place down the road.

    darienlibrary:

    I’ve started leaving Foursquare tips around town from the Library’s account. How would you like to eat at a restaurant and then see what dish your local librarian recommends hmmm?

    The Darien Library is everywhere on the internet and maybe also in real life. At your farmer’s market. In your supermarket cheese aisle. Ordering dumplings at the Thai place down the road.

  13. Survey: Social media use in archives and special collections →

    ex-tabulis:

    Librarians, archivists, and information professionals of tumblr! I am researching social media use in archives and special collections, and part of my project is to send out a survey to archives and special collections about their current practices. I would appreciate it so much if you could re-blog and/or send this link around!

    Hey beloved librarian tumblr community! Let’s support each other. Here’s one good way to start (or continue): TAKE THIS SURVEY! For a more in-depth explanation, click through here.

  14. If you can take yourself out of your first world techie social media smart-shoes for a second then imagine this: you’re 53 years old, you’ve been in prison from 20 to 26, you didn’t finish high school, and you have a grandson who you’re now supporting because your daughter is in jail. You’re lucky, you have a job at the local Wendy’s. You have to fill out a renewal form for government assistance which has just been moved online as a cost saving measure (this isn’t hypothetical, more and more municipalities are doing this now). You have a very limited idea of how to use a computer, you don’t have Internet access, and your survival (and the survival of your grandson) is contingent upon this form being filled out correctly.

    — 

    Why we should care about libraries (via A Whole Lotta Nothing)

    Other than the problematic phrase “first world” (hate “first world problems” ugh!), I completely agree. I believe that this is what libraries need to become. I have spent time helping people fill out forms, find the correct documents, even send an email. I figured out what people wanted through hand gestures. I just think there’s so much we can offer to people from so many backgrounds.

    And yet we still have so many accessibility issues. 

    (via morerobots)

  15. queenslibrary:

Showing off our library’s social (media) side (Taken with instagram).

Queens Library has LJ beat on social media. But if/when we get on Pinterest, your minds will be blown.

    queenslibrary:

    Showing off our library’s social (media) side (Taken with instagram).

    Queens Library has LJ beat on social media. But if/when we get on Pinterest, your minds will be blown.