1. randomhouse:

    World Cup of Books: Semifinals Edition: Brazil

    Before today’s match against Germany, brush up on your Portuguese with four indispensable works by Brazilian authors:

  2. willywaldo:

nypl:

Has international World Cup fever inspired you to look for some books from around the globe? If so, check out NYPL’s Literary World Cup featuring authors from each competing country. It’s a great way to find some new writers to enjoy! 

What a clever idea to promote your collection and encourage your patrons to read fiction in translation!

    willywaldo:

    nypl:

    Has international World Cup fever inspired you to look for some books from around the globe? If so, check out NYPL’s Literary World Cup featuring authors from each competing country. It’s a great way to find some new writers to enjoy! 

    What a clever idea to promote your collection and encourage your patrons to read fiction in translation!

  3. An Essential List of WWI Books →

    picadorbookroom:

    2014 marks the 100-year anniversary of World War One. If you’re curious to read more about The Great War, we’ve got the book list for you:

    imageAmong the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear
    In Among the Mad, the sixth volume of the Maise Dobbs mystery series, Jacqueline Winspear combines a…

  4. Reading Rainbow: Celebrating LGBT Literature | The Scribd Blog →

    A nice roundup, if brief,  for Pride week.

  5. Las Vegas Reads | ALA 2014 Preview →

    Viva Las Vegas books!

  6. thisisteen:

Share your love of young adult books this week!
Choose your color here!
Follow along May 19-23 for your daily dose of YA pride from some of our favorite authors and share your YA book recommendations using #IreadYA!

Show your pride! Great idea for RA.

    thisisteen:

    Share your love of young adult books this week!

    Choose your color here!

    Follow along May 19-23 for your daily dose of YA pride from some of our favorite authors and share your YA book recommendations using #IreadYA!

    Show your pride! Great idea for RA.

  7. Oldies but Goodies: Genre Backlists for Cool Summer Reads →

    Summer is a-coming in, and the holds for the big new books are growing. While your patrons wait for the new Daniel Silva or Chelsea Cain or Diana Gabaldon, why not suggest some of these backlist titles. 

  8. lawrencepubliclibrary:

    Summer reading is coming! Let us help you find a great book. 

    Great RA suggestions for you tumblarians!

  9. go-book-yourself:

Click the info-graphic or HERE for goodreads links

Nice RA!

    go-book-yourself:

    Click the info-graphic or HERE for goodreads links

    Nice RA!

  10. rachelfershleiser said: What am I gonna read til there are more Veronica Mars novels, HAAAAALLLP!

    rachelfershleiser:

    wordbookstores:

    This is indeed a conundrum! There is always Sara Gran; Jenn likes to imagine that in an alternate universe Claire de Witt takes Veronica under her wing and the two of them mock, stomp, and punch their way through mysteries together. On the other end of the age scale there’s Alice LaPlante’s Turn of Mind, in which a woman with Alzheimer’s tries to solve the mystery of her best friend’s death — and her own participation in it. (This one is so good about mothers, daughters, and friendship.) If you’re not already a devotee of Patricia Highsmith, you should start with The Price of Salt which is more of a thriller than a mystery but still soooo good. We’re pretty sure you’ve already read Megan Abbott but if you haven’t, DO SO IMMEDIATELY. And maybe also Cara Hoffman’s So Much Pretty, which has a spunky teenage character, some class issues, and takes a serious (read: may give you nightmares) look at women and sexual assault.

    A good bookseller can recommend smart, feminist mysteries; a great bookseller can recommend smart, feminist mysteries *and* knows what you’ve already read and what you’re too afraid to read.

    Tumblarians, care to add other titles to this most excellent mix?

  11. New Adult Fiction | PLA 2014 →

    New Adult (NA) fiction is the rage these days in the publishing world, but what is it exactly? Is it an new adult fiction copy 300x93 New Adult Fiction | PLA 2014 actual genre or just a marketing term? At a lively PLA 2014 ConverStation session entitled “New Adult Fiction: What is It, Where is It, and What Should We Do with It?” facilitators Sophie Brookover (LibraryLinkNJ—The Library Cooperative, Piscataway, NJ) and Kelly Jensen (Beloit (WI) Public Library)  threw out five questions for the audience to discuss at their tables and then share in the main conversation. How do you define New Adult? Do you think New Adult matters as a category? Do you have patrons asking specifically for this category? How do you explain to colleagues who the NA reader may be? Should NA fiction be shelved in a special place?

    Tumblarians, join the conversation. Do you get requests for New Adult fiction as it’s currently defined?

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  12. Veronica Mars | Pop Culture Advisory →

    Last week, the Kickstartered Veronica Mars movie came out in a limited theatrical release as well as being available simultaneously on Video On Demand. It may have slaked fans’ thirst for the escapades of a wisecracking, whip-smart female sleuth and her star-crossed lover(s?) for a little while, but they’ll be looking for more content in that vein before long.

    Tumblarians, did you know that LJ media editor Stephanie Klose writes  a monthly online RA column focusing all type of media (from books to online games) that embrace and reflect pop culture? You can check out her previous columns here: http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/…/pop-culture-advisory/ 

    Great stuff for your patrons!

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  13. HAPPY FRIDAY PICKS: THINK GREEN

    mgpl:

    image image image image image image 

  14. Church Ladies, Preachers, Gangstas | African American Fiction (and More)

    Put on your best Sunday going-to-church hat but be sure to pack some heat with that Bible. Four solid African American inspirational titles populate this month’s column, but also included is a major urban fiction author’s latest work. Wahida Clark’s writing is loaded with thrills, but her characters’ faith relies on a .38 Special pistol.

    And kudos to columnist Rollie James Welch, the 2014 winner of the Allie Beth Martin Award. Sponsored by Baker & Taylor and presented by the Public Library Association (PLA), this award honors a public librarian for demonstrating a range and depth of knowledge about books and other library materials and the distinguished ability to share that knowledge. Although Rollie (formerly collection manager, Cleveland Public Library, and now principal librarian, adult collection development, Lee County Public Library, Fort Myers, FL) was cited for his work with YA resources and teen literature, he also credits the years of writing this column for his recognition. He joins such other RA notables as Kaite Maite Mediatore Stover, Angelina Benedetti, Rebecca Vnuk. Barry Trott, Barbara Genco, and Nancy Pearl. Keep up the excellent work, Rollie!—Ed.

  15. The State of Readers’ Advisory →

    Does your library offer a readers’ advisory (RA) service? If so, you’re in good company—and a lot of it! All of the public librarians who answered a survey recently developed by LJ with NoveList and the RUSA/CODES Readers’ Advisory Research and Trends Committee said that they conducted personal RA in-house. Methods varied, however.

    Four points of service emerged: in-person RA takes place 85% of the time at the reference desk and 59% at the circulation desk. Self-directed RA is also highly popular, with 94% of libraries creating book displays, for example, and 75% offering book lists. Book-oriented programs are widespread, too: the survey shows that book clubs (89%) and author visits (86%) are held at most libraries. The fourth point of service was digital: 79% of libraries provide read-alikes or other such tips on their websites, and a little less than half, recommendations via social media.

    (Source: addtoany.com)