1. rachelfershleiser asked: What am I gonna read til there are more Veronica Mars novels, HAAAAALLLP!

    rachelfershleiser:

    wordbookstores:

    This is indeed a conundrum! There is always Sara Gran; Jenn likes to imagine that in an alternate universe Claire de Witt takes Veronica under her wing and the two of them mock, stomp, and punch their way through mysteries together. On the other end of the age scale there’s Alice LaPlante’s Turn of Mind, in which a woman with Alzheimer’s tries to solve the mystery of her best friend’s death — and her own participation in it. (This one is so good about mothers, daughters, and friendship.) If you’re not already a devotee of Patricia Highsmith, you should start with The Price of Salt which is more of a thriller than a mystery but still soooo good. We’re pretty sure you’ve already read Megan Abbott but if you haven’t, DO SO IMMEDIATELY. And maybe also Cara Hoffman’s So Much Pretty, which has a spunky teenage character, some class issues, and takes a serious (read: may give you nightmares) look at women and sexual assault.

    A good bookseller can recommend smart, feminist mysteries; a great bookseller can recommend smart, feminist mysteries *and* knows what you’ve already read and what you’re too afraid to read.

    Tumblarians, care to add other titles to this most excellent mix?

  2. New Adult Fiction | PLA 2014 →

    New Adult (NA) fiction is the rage these days in the publishing world, but what is it exactly? Is it an new adult fiction copy 300x93 New Adult Fiction | PLA 2014 actual genre or just a marketing term? At a lively PLA 2014 ConverStation session entitled “New Adult Fiction: What is It, Where is It, and What Should We Do with It?” facilitators Sophie Brookover (LibraryLinkNJ—The Library Cooperative, Piscataway, NJ) and Kelly Jensen (Beloit (WI) Public Library)  threw out five questions for the audience to discuss at their tables and then share in the main conversation. How do you define New Adult? Do you think New Adult matters as a category? Do you have patrons asking specifically for this category? How do you explain to colleagues who the NA reader may be? Should NA fiction be shelved in a special place?

    Tumblarians, join the conversation. Do you get requests for New Adult fiction as it’s currently defined?

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  3. Veronica Mars | Pop Culture Advisory →

    Last week, the Kickstartered Veronica Mars movie came out in a limited theatrical release as well as being available simultaneously on Video On Demand. It may have slaked fans’ thirst for the escapades of a wisecracking, whip-smart female sleuth and her star-crossed lover(s?) for a little while, but they’ll be looking for more content in that vein before long.

    Tumblarians, did you know that LJ media editor Stephanie Klose writes  a monthly online RA column focusing all type of media (from books to online games) that embrace and reflect pop culture? You can check out her previous columns here: http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/…/pop-culture-advisory/ 

    Great stuff for your patrons!

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  4. HAPPY FRIDAY PICKS: THINK GREEN

    mgpl:

    image image image image image image 

  5. Church Ladies, Preachers, Gangstas | African American Fiction (and More)

    Put on your best Sunday going-to-church hat but be sure to pack some heat with that Bible. Four solid African American inspirational titles populate this month’s column, but also included is a major urban fiction author’s latest work. Wahida Clark’s writing is loaded with thrills, but her characters’ faith relies on a .38 Special pistol.

    And kudos to columnist Rollie James Welch, the 2014 winner of the Allie Beth Martin Award. Sponsored by Baker & Taylor and presented by the Public Library Association (PLA), this award honors a public librarian for demonstrating a range and depth of knowledge about books and other library materials and the distinguished ability to share that knowledge. Although Rollie (formerly collection manager, Cleveland Public Library, and now principal librarian, adult collection development, Lee County Public Library, Fort Myers, FL) was cited for his work with YA resources and teen literature, he also credits the years of writing this column for his recognition. He joins such other RA notables as Kaite Maite Mediatore Stover, Angelina Benedetti, Rebecca Vnuk. Barry Trott, Barbara Genco, and Nancy Pearl. Keep up the excellent work, Rollie!—Ed.

  6. The State of Readers’ Advisory →

    Does your library offer a readers’ advisory (RA) service? If so, you’re in good company—and a lot of it! All of the public librarians who answered a survey recently developed by LJ with NoveList and the RUSA/CODES Readers’ Advisory Research and Trends Committee said that they conducted personal RA in-house. Methods varied, however.

    Four points of service emerged: in-person RA takes place 85% of the time at the reference desk and 59% at the circulation desk. Self-directed RA is also highly popular, with 94% of libraries creating book displays, for example, and 75% offering book lists. Book-oriented programs are widespread, too: the survey shows that book clubs (89%) and author visits (86%) are held at most libraries. The fourth point of service was digital: 79% of libraries provide read-alikes or other such tips on their websites, and a little less than half, recommendations via social media.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  7. harriscountypl:

The January libraryreads list is out now.  The favorite title is The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley and is from one of my favorite series -  The Flavia de Luce mysteries.  Check out the whole list at LibraryReads. 

    harriscountypl:

    The January libraryreads list is out now.  The favorite title is The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley and is from one of my favorite series -  The Flavia de Luce mysteries.  Check out the whole list at LibraryReads

  8. libraryreads:

    Just in time for the holidays, the December Library Reads list is active! This month we have the new Adriana Trigiani, a naked werewolf (aren’t they always naked?), a gothic mystery, and drinking! Enjoy.

    And this afternoon Library Journal will release its top ten books of 2013 in the 11/14 issue of LJReviews. Stay tuned!

  9. Pop Culture Advisory: Welcome to Night Vale →

    Welcome to Night Vale is a hugely popular, twice-monthly podcast that’s best described as what you’d get if Prairie Home Companion was reported by Shirley Jackson. It’s a community radio show, yes, but reports abound of glowing clouds and faceless old women, feral dogs and strange happenings at the PTA meeting in the small desert town of Night Vale.

    Looking for books, television, and movies to suggest for Night Vale fans yields an embarrassment of riches; “Small Town Weird” is an exceedingly rich category to mine.

    Are you and your patrons Night Vale fans? Media Editor Stephanie Klose offers an array of readalikes, watchalikes, and listenalikes as well as some programming suggestions. Listening party, anyone?

    image

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  10. theantidote:


Bowie’s 100 Must-Reads
The Age of American Unreason, Susan Jacoby (2008)The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz (2007)The Coast of Utopia (trilogy), Tom Stoppard (2007) Teenage: The Creation of Youth 1875-1945, Jon Savage (2007)Fingersmith, Sarah Waters (2002)The Trial of Henry Kissinger, Christopher Hitchens (2001)Mr Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, Lawrence Weschler (1997)A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1890-1924, Orlando Figes (1997)The Insult, Rupert Thomson (1996)Wonder Boys, Michael Chabon (1995)The Bird Artist, Howard Norman (1994)Kafka Was the Rage: A Greenwich Village Memoir, Anatole Broyard (1993)Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-Historical Perspective, Arthur C Danto (1992)Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson, Camille Paglia (1990)David Bomberg, Richard Cork (1988)Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom, Peter Guralnick (1986)The Songlines, Bruce Chatwin (1986)Hawksmoor, Peter Ackroyd (1985)Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey (1984)Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter (1984)Money, Martin Amis (1984)White Noise, Don DeLillo (1984)Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes (1984)The Life and Times of Little Richard, Charles White (1984)A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn (1980)A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (1980)Interviews with Francis Bacon, David Sylvester (1980)Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler (1980)Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess (1980)Raw, a “graphix magazine” (1980-91)Viz, magazine (1979 –)The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels (1979)Metropolitan Life, Fran Lebowitz (1978)In Between the Sheets, Ian McEwan (1978)Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, ed Malcolm Cowley (1977)The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes (1976)Tales of Beatnik Glory, Ed Saunders (1975)Mystery Train, Greil Marcus (1975)Selected Poems, Frank O’Hara (1974)Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s, Otto Friedrich (1972)n Bluebeard’s Castle: Some Notes Towards the Re-definition of Culture, George Steiner (1971) Octobriana and the Russian Underground, Peter Sadecky (1971)The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll, Charlie Gillett(1970)The Quest for Christa T, Christa Wolf (1968)Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock, Nik Cohn (1968)The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)Journey into the Whirlwind, Eugenia Ginzburg (1967)Last Exit to Brooklyn, Hubert Selby Jr (1966)In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965)City of Night, John Rechy (1965)Herzog, Saul Bellow (1964)Puckoon, Spike Milligan (1963)The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford (1963)The Sailor Who Fell from Grace With the Sea, Yukio Mishima (1963)The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin (1963)A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess (1962)Inside the Whale and Other Essays, George Orwell (1962)The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark (1961)Private Eye, magazine (1961)On Having No Head: Zen and the Rediscovery of the Obvious, Douglas Harding (1961)Silence: Lectures and Writing, John Cage (1961)Strange People, Frank Edwards (1961)The Divided Self, RD Laing (1960)All the Emperor’s Horses, David Kidd (1960)Billy Liar, Keith Waterhouse (1959)The Leopard, Giuseppe di Lampedusa (1958)On the Road, Jack Kerouac (1957)The Hidden Persuaders, Vance Packard (1957)Room at the Top, John Braine (1957)A Grave for a Dolphin, Alberto Denti di Pirajno (1956)The Outsider, Colin Wilson (1956)Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (1955)Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell (1949)The Street, Ann Petry (1946)Black Boy, Richard Wright (1945)

(via kateoplis:)

Tumblarians, I see another great book display in your future!

    theantidote:

    Bowie’s 100 Must-Reads

    The Age of American Unreason, Susan Jacoby (2008)
    The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz (2007)
    The Coast of Utopia (trilogy), Tom Stoppard (2007) 
    Teenage: The Creation of Youth 1875-1945, Jon Savage (2007)
    Fingersmith, Sarah Waters (2002)
    The Trial of Henry Kissinger, Christopher Hitchens (2001)
    Mr Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, Lawrence Weschler (1997)
    A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1890-1924, Orlando Figes (1997)
    The Insult, Rupert Thomson (1996)
    Wonder Boys, Michael Chabon (1995)
    The Bird Artist, Howard Norman (1994)
    Kafka Was the Rage: A Greenwich Village Memoir, Anatole Broyard (1993)
    Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-Historical Perspective, Arthur C Danto (1992)
    Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson, Camille Paglia (1990)
    David Bomberg, Richard Cork (1988)
    Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom, Peter Guralnick (1986)
    The Songlines, Bruce Chatwin (1986)
    Hawksmoor, Peter Ackroyd (1985)
    Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey (1984)
    Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter (1984)
    Money, Martin Amis (1984)
    White Noise, Don DeLillo (1984)
    Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes (1984)
    The Life and Times of Little Richard, Charles White (1984)
    A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn (1980)
    A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (1980)
    Interviews with Francis Bacon, David Sylvester (1980)
    Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler (1980)
    Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess (1980)
    Raw, a “graphix magazine” (1980-91)
    Viz, magazine (1979 –)
    The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels (1979)
    Metropolitan Life, Fran Lebowitz (1978)
    In Between the Sheets, Ian McEwan (1978)
    Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, ed Malcolm Cowley (1977)
    The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes (1976)
    Tales of Beatnik Glory, Ed Saunders (1975)
    Mystery Train, Greil Marcus (1975)
    Selected Poems, Frank O’Hara (1974)
    Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s, Otto Friedrich (1972)
    n Bluebeard’s Castle: Some Notes Towards the Re-definition of Culture, George Steiner (1971) Octobriana and the Russian Underground, Peter Sadecky (1971)
    The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll, Charlie Gillett(1970)
    The Quest for Christa T, Christa Wolf (1968)
    Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock, Nik Cohn (1968)
    The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)
    Journey into the Whirlwind, Eugenia Ginzburg (1967)
    Last Exit to Brooklyn, Hubert Selby Jr (1966)
    In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965)
    City of Night, John Rechy (1965)
    Herzog, Saul Bellow (1964)
    Puckoon, Spike Milligan (1963)
    The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford (1963)
    The Sailor Who Fell from Grace With the Sea, Yukio Mishima (1963)
    The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin (1963)
    A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess (1962)
    Inside the Whale and Other Essays, George Orwell (1962)
    The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark (1961)
    Private Eye, magazine (1961)
    On Having No Head: Zen and the Rediscovery of the Obvious, Douglas Harding (1961)
    Silence: Lectures and Writing, John Cage (1961)
    Strange People, Frank Edwards (1961)
    The Divided Self, RD Laing (1960)
    All the Emperor’s Horses, David Kidd (1960)
    Billy Liar, Keith Waterhouse (1959)
    The Leopard, Giuseppe di Lampedusa (1958)
    On the Road, Jack Kerouac (1957)
    The Hidden Persuaders, Vance Packard (1957)
    Room at the Top, John Braine (1957)
    A Grave for a Dolphin, Alberto Denti di Pirajno (1956)
    The Outsider, Colin Wilson (1956)
    Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (1955)
    Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell (1949)
    The Street, Ann Petry (1946)
    Black Boy, Richard Wright (1945)

    (via kateoplis:)

    Tumblarians, I see another great book display in your future!

  11. YA Crossover Tops Inaugural LibraryReads List →

    The inaugural LibraryReads lists ten newly published and forthcoming titles nominated as “favorites” by librarians from around the country. The surprise is the first pick—a YA crossover described by School Library Journal as a “charming coming-of-age novel tells the story of a painfully shy teen who prefers the fantasy world of fanfiction to reality.”

    The monthly list will be publicized and promoted by librarians in library branches as well as in patron newsletters, websites, etc., and will appear in Library Journal alongside an author interview. (See LJ 9/15/13 for the Q&A with Jamie Ford).

    OH YES!!!!

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  12. Bookavore: More great graphic novels for seniors →

    bookavore:

    A few weeks ago I suggested five great graphic novels for seniors and asked for more suggestions, which I got, and thank you! Here are some that look particularly great (for seniors, but also for me—I haven’t read about half of these but I am adding all of them to the list). Keep suggesting, please:

  13. As Lewis Carroll’s Alice so aptly points out, “What is the use of a book…without pictures or conversations?” Welcome to RA Crossroads, where books, movies, music, and other media converge, and whole-collection reader’s advisory service goes where it may. In this column, Robert Langdon and Dante lead me down a winding path.

    — 

    Dan Brown’s Inferno | RA Crossroads

    LJ's readers advisory expert Neal Wyatt takes on what to read after Inferno.

  14. rachelfershleiser:

I may not have won a Kobo, but I did win some smart booksellers!

GPOLJ.

    rachelfershleiser:

    I may not have won a Kobo, but I did win some smart booksellers!

    GPOLJ.

  15. bookavore:

Readers’ advisory practice

So cool.

    bookavore:

    Readers’ advisory practice

    So cool.