1. digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

    We had so much fun uncovering gilded and fanciful book cover after gilded and fanciful book cover for our recent Summer of Archives feature that we thought we’d share a few more just for the heck of it. These five covers were designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962) and Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944), our two most favorite designers of the bunch.

    A bit about Armstrong:

    "Margaret Armstrong was among a number of important woman cover designers, beginning her work in the late 1880s. She began her career at A.C. McClurg and then went on to other publishers, primarily Scribner’s, for whom she designed half of her total output of about 270 books." [source]

    And Bradley:

    At the peak of Will H. Bradley’s career in the late 19th and early 20th century he was acknowledged as one of the premier American graphic artists of his time and had made a marked impact on fine and commercial graphic arts. He contributed to the growth of various artistic movements within the United States and influenced developments in illustration and layout practices in the book and periodical arts. He did not restrict himself to a narrow range of styles, and his body of work, including his publishers’ bindings, shows him to be one of the more diverse artists of his generation. [source]

    Love vintage book covers? DPLA’s got you covered.

    Image credits

    1. Binding for “Like a Gallant Lady" (1897 edition) by Kate M. Cleary. Designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.
    2. Binding for “The Quest of the Golden Girl" (1896 edition) by Richard Le Galliene. Designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.
    3. Binding for “A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" (1911 edition) by Henry David Thoreau. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available
    4. Binding for “Astoria, or, Anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains" (1897 edition) by Washington Irving. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.
    5. Binding for “The Bird’s Calendar" (1894 edition) by H.E. Parkhurst. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.

  2. uicspecialcollections:

smithsonian:

Our colleagues at smithsonianlibraries rock our socks off with their animated GIF skills. Now they are sharing their tips with the world
(via Library Hacks: Creating Animated GIFs – Smithsonian Libraries Blog)

Make your own rare book gifs!

    uicspecialcollections:

    smithsonian:

    Our colleagues at smithsonianlibraries rock our socks off with their animated GIF skills. Now they are sharing their tips with the world

    (via Library Hacks: Creating Animated GIFs – Smithsonian Libraries Blog)

    Make your own rare book gifs!

  3. The Cleveland Public Library Found a Lost First Edition Copy of 'A Christmas Carol' →

    What a great way to celebrate Boxing Day!

    The Cleveland Public Library Found a Lost First Edition Copy of 'A Christmas Carol'Wikimedia Commons

    The leather-bound book, donated at one point but soon forgotten about, is one of only 6,000 first-run copies printed on Dec. 17, 1843. At the time, it cost a modest 5 shillings. In the last few years, first editions have sold at auction for several thousand dollars.

  4. In Defense of Books

    jasonwdean:

    Tumblarians!

    I am writing a rough draft of some of my thoughts on books (especially rare books) and libraries thinking about how the book as a special physical object is a bit lost in all the digital noise, and would love some collaboration on this around your  (and my) ideas. If you’d like to contribute, or want more information, let me know!

    Interested?

    Signal boost.

  5. theartofgooglebooks:

    The author becomes a text: pasted-in portrait, clipped from a newspaper. 

    From the front matter of The Purgatory of Suicides: A Prison-Rhyme by Thomas Cooper (1850). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 6, 2006.

    Look at that face!

  6. Bad behavior in the library →

    jothelibrarian:

    I’ve been beavering away at work so not had much time to catch up with my RSS feeds from the real world (i.e. libraries which aren’t the one I work in!). Today’s favourite read was this gem titled“Theft, vandalism and hatred: 400 years of bad behaviour in the King James Library, part 1” from the University of St Andrews.

    A well used copy of John Mairs Brief survey of the terraqueous globe (Edinburgh, 1762).

    The blog post is such a great read! Go, now! And sign up to the RSS feed!

  7. A collection of rare books, including an illustrated copy of Paradise Lost, has been discovered in a hidden cupboard in a Scottish library.

    The literary haul was found in Greenock’s Watt Library by archivist Neil Dickson.

    The collection includes a 1538 edition of letters by Roman philosopher Cicero and an 1827 illustrated 
edition of John Milton’s Paradise Lost – one of only 50 copies.

    — Rare books discovered in hidden cupboard” in the Scotsman

  8. Book Deal of the Day:

    rachelfershleiser:

    “New York Public Library Rare Books Librarian Jessica Pigza’s HANDMADE AT THE LIBRARY, in which readers will learn how to use the riches of libraries, both online and off, to inspire all manner of craft/design/DIY endeavors…”

    YES YES YES YES YES YES YES!

  9. At Brown University, Stumbling Across a Rarity in the Rare Book Room →

    infoneer-pulse:

    A few weeks ago, Ms. Malchodi opened yet another leather-bound book, one of more than 300,000 rare volumes in the hold of the John Hay Library. With surgical precision, she turned the pages of a medical text once owned by Solomon Drowne, Class of ’73 (1773, that is.). And there, in the back, she found a piece of paper depicting the baptism of Jesus. It was signed:

    “P. Revere Sculp.”

    Ye gods! Had Marie Malchodi, of Cranston, R.I., book conservation technician, just made contact with Paul Revere, of Boston, silversmith? Revere, who knew of the fiery need to share vital information, would have appreciated Ms. Malchodi’s galloping reaction, which was:

    “I have to show this to somebody.”

    » via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)