1. Writing What I Know | Behind the Book, March 1, 2014 →

    There is perhaps no more fraught phrase in the book business than “second novel.” I think everyone wishes that these books could be skipped entirely and all novelists could progress directly from first to third.

    Author Chris Pavone, who made a big best-selling splash with his debut espionage thriller The Ex-Pats, now tackles the dreaded second novel. The Accident is no sophomore slump, but an engaging thriller about the workings of the publishing world, something Pavone knows quite well.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  2. classicpenguin:

THIS IS REALLY EXCITING. ELDA ROTOR IS DOING A REDDIT AMA.
Penguin Classics Editorial Director Elda Rotor will be available to answer your questions on Reddit next Tuesday. She’s also an Associate Publisher. Don’t know what that means? This seems like a good time to ask. Elda has been at Penguin for seven years now, and was previously a Senior Trade Editor at Oxford University Press. She’s a beloved figure here and font of knowledge on publishing and classics.
So start thinking of questions now: What’s it like to work in publishing? How does one become an editor? What goes into the making of a Penguin Classic? What was it like working with Guillermo del Toro? The possibilities are endless.


Ever wondered what it’s like to be an editor? Tumblarians, here’s your chance.

    classicpenguin:

    THIS IS REALLY EXCITING. ELDA ROTOR IS DOING A REDDIT AMA.

    Penguin Classics Editorial Director Elda Rotor will be available to answer your questions on Reddit next Tuesday. She’s also an Associate Publisher. Don’t know what that means? This seems like a good time to ask. Elda has been at Penguin for seven years now, and was previously a Senior Trade Editor at Oxford University Press. She’s a beloved figure here and font of knowledge on publishing and classics.

    So start thinking of questions now: What’s it like to work in publishing? How does one become an editor? What goes into the making of a Penguin Classic? What was it like working with Guillermo del Toro? The possibilities are endless.

    Ever wondered what it’s like to be an editor? Tumblarians, here’s your chance.

  3. pantheonbooks:

And then this happened.

Book publishing makes out with itself.

    pantheonbooks:

    And then this happened.

    Book publishing makes out with itself.

  4. CLOUD UNBOUND: Hachette Book Group USA To Sell Its Entire Ebook Catalog to Libraries →

    You likely read New York Public Library president Anthony W. Marx’s passionate op-edinThe New York Timesthis morning (in which he broke the news that Hachette Book Group USA will begin selling its entire ebook catalog to the library market).

    Below is our official press release. We’re excited to work with Hachette, and we thank everyone for all of their hard work on making this relationship possible.

    More progress TK. Not to mention marketing from yours truly.

    St. Paul, Minn. – May 1, 2013 – The 3M Cloud Library eBook Lending Service will add titles from Hachette Book Group to its catalog of offerings, giving readers access to books from popular authors including James Patterson and Nicholas Sparks. Hachette Book Group’s full eBook catalog will be available to libraries with no delay on new titles.

    The new agreement with Hachette Book Group means that 3M Cloud Library now offers content from all of the Big Six publishers. The service’s continuously growing list of publishers now numbers more than 300.

    “3M Cloud Library aspires to achieve the breadth and depth of the best public libraries’ collections, to ensure that readers of all tastes find the perfect book,” said Tom Mercer, marketing manager, 3M Cloud Library. “We continue to build a diverse, multi-language collection with relevance, balance, and richness for all readers.”

    The addition of Hachette Book Group titles follows a successful pilot program, during which 3M was able to provide compelling data to the publisher on sales and circulation for its books. Since its launch in 2011, the 3M Cloud Library has lead many such programs, helping publishers gain a greater understanding of the eBook marketplace.

    For more information about the 3M Cloud Library eLending system, visit 3M.com/Cloud.

    Big news from Hachette.

  5. The Pulitzers are the last of the major annual book awards to be announced for the publishing year, so the winners tend to be known quantities. Jennifer Egan’s A Visit From the Goon Squad (Knopf), Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (Riverhead) and Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) all won the National Book Critics Circle Award en route to Pulitzers. All but one Pulitzer for fiction since 2000 have been awarded to books published by a Big Six publisher, so most winners have had considerable marketing dollars behind them and a considerable number of copies in print.

    — 

    Scott Porch: Who Will Win The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction 2013?

    I for one am curious to hear the announcement on Monday. Who can say!

  6. The move also adds to the sense that Amazon is slowly buying up much of the book world. Over some 15 years, the company has bought AbeBooks.com, Audible.com, Brilliance Audio, the Book Depository, Shelfari, BookFinder.com, Lexcycle, BookSurge, CreateSpace, Mobipocket.com and (through AbeBooks) 40% of Library Thing.

    — 

    Amazon Buying Goodreads: Industry Reactions - Shelf Awareness

    Pretty impressive list of ownership by Amazon. And by impressive, I mean “thoughtfully frightening sometimes”.

    (via booksyarnink)

  7. More than 40 countries with over one-third of the world’s population have fair use or fair dealing provisions in their copyright laws.

    — The Fair Use/Fair Dealing Handbook collects every known fair use or fair dealing statute in the world. Prepared by Jonathan Band and Jonathan Gerafi. (via arlpolicynotes)

  8. Penguin Lifts Library Ebook Purchase Embargo - The Digital Shift

Penguin Group today announced that it will be changing the terms on its library ebook lending program, and on Tuesday, April 2, will begin allowing libraries to purchase and lend ebook titles the day that hardcover editions are released, according to The Associated Press. Previously, Penguin had placed a six month embargo on new ebooks, requiring libraries to wait half a year before purchasing.

(gif via)

    Penguin Lifts Library Ebook Purchase Embargo - The Digital Shift

    Penguin Group today announced that it will be changing the terms on its library ebook lending program, and on Tuesday, April 2, will begin allowing libraries to purchase and lend ebook titles the day that hardcover editions are released, according to The Associated Press. Previously, Penguin had placed a six month embargo on new ebooks, requiring libraries to wait half a year before purchasing.

    (gif via)

  9. Amazon Publishing launches literary fiction imprint, Little A →

    cloudunbound:

    More below from Laura Hazard Owen on the content:

    "Upcoming titles from Little A will include James Franco’s novel Actors Anonymous — which Larry Kirshbaum signed back in 2011, and which will be published this October — among others. A digital-only series called Day One will focus on ‘short stories from debut writers’; those will be sold in the Kindle Singles store.”

    Unsurprised on the inclusion of one J. Francs.

  10. Under the new Provincetown Public Press digital publishing imprint, a dozen or so writers and artists will learn this year how to create a digital book of their work and market it on the Internet, library officials announced Thursday.

    Provincetown Public Press, a new digital book publishing operation of the public library, is offering writers and artists the ability to create and distribute a digital book on the Internet.

    This might be a first in the country, library director Cheryl Napsha said Friday. “We haven’t seen it anywhere. There are some libraries that are starting to print physical books using high-end copiers. To the best of my knowledge, no one has gone digital.”

    The library is starting the press as a public service, she said. It will be funded by a $3,000 donation.

    — Library as Publisher: A Massachusetts Public Library Will Soon Begin Publishing eBooks | LJ INFOdocket

  11. Library Journal is Hiring!
Library Journal, the leading trade magazine serving the library industry and profession, seeks a take-charge editor to lead coverage of issues and trends (e.g., shifting formats, downloadable, distribution) in audio, video, gaming, and music as they impact libraries, as well as to cover related trends in the library world.
Media Editor also is responsible for assigning/editing 40-plus reviews for each print issue of the magazine, as well as managing the media section: writing news for audio and video and establishing a rotation for assigning/writing Q&As and spotlights.
Media Editor will likewise develop several annual AV features (writing some, recruiting writers and developing feature focus) and edit media columns, including music and gaming. Editor will develop and sustain relationships with vendors, librarians, and outside experts, in addition to other general duties such as:
• Recruiting and fostering reviewers• Keeping current with the book trends and library market news, with an eye toward  contributing ideas for new and expanding areas of coverage• Representing LJ at live and virtual events such as webcasts and conferences• Contributing to the LJ review section’s blog, In the Bookroom, and to LJ’s social media presence

    Library Journal is Hiring!

    Library Journal, the leading trade magazine serving the library industry and profession, seeks a take-charge editor to lead coverage of issues and trends (e.g., shifting formats, downloadable, distribution) in audio, video, gaming, and music as they impact libraries, as well as to cover related trends in the library world.

    Media Editor also is responsible for assigning/editing 40-plus reviews for each print issue of the magazine, as well as managing the media section: writing news for audio and video and establishing a rotation for assigning/writing Q&As and spotlights.

    Media Editor will likewise develop several annual AV features (writing some, recruiting writers and developing feature focus) and edit media columns, including music and gaming. Editor will develop and sustain relationships with vendors, librarians, and outside experts, in addition to other general duties such as:

    • Recruiting and fostering reviewers
    • Keeping current with the book trends and library market news, with an eye toward  contributing ideas for new and expanding areas of coverage
    • Representing LJ at live and virtual events such as webcasts and conferences
    • Contributing to the LJ review section’s blog, In the Bookroom, and to LJ’s social media presence

  12. This positive first decision by one of the antitrust authorities is an important milestone on the path to uniting two of the world’s leading publishing companies into a truly global publishing group. It will enable investments worldwide in new digital publishing models, in new distribution paths, products and services and in the major growth markets.

    — 

    Thomas Rabe, chairman and chief executive of Bertelsmann, in his statement about the Department of Justice’s approval of the Random House-Penguin merger last week. I missed this owing to a Valentine’s Day spreadsheet massacre of my own doing.

    This just in: the EU will have made its decision about the merger by April 15.

    What’s it all mean for libraries? I wouldn’t profess to know at this stage, but I’m not wary. I’m hoping at the very least it will mean a continuation of the trust that Random House and Penguin have demonstrated as separate entities.

    (via cloudunbound)

  13. cloudunbound:


I’ve spent a goodly amount of February shining a giant pink light on Cloud partner Harlequin (see my overview of its series, Harlequin’s quick-and-dirty guide to erotica, and Cloud librarian Maureen Roberts’s interview with KISS author Kelly Hunter). Before the month of love and eros slips away, romance fans and publishing pundits of all platforms should, if they haven’t already, meet Angela James, executive editor of Harlequin’s digital-first, DRM-free imprint, Carina Press. 
Below is Cloud librarian Erin Shea’s scintillating email conversation with James (pictured above, with e-reader in hand), who lives and dies by her intimate, enviable connection with the romance audience. She’s also a believer in the library as discovery center and holds forth with ten years of digital publishing experience on the relationship among word of mouth, digital marketing, libraries, and sales.

ES: Carina Press is a “digital-first, DRM free” imprint of Harlequin. Would you explain what this means for library users downloading your ebooks?
AJ: This actually means very positive things for library users, because Carina Press has chosen not to put DRM, or Digital Rights Management, on our titles, including those bought by libraries. This means library users can easily move the files they check out from the library to their device of choice. I have had a number of librarians tell me that, because of this, they often use Carina Press titles to demonstrate to patrons how to move files to a device, because we make it quite painless.
ES: Your imprint primarily publishes genre fiction. Do you think genre fans consume their reading in a way that makes a DRM-free business model more sustainable than, say, nonfiction?
AJ: I don’t consider myself an expert on the nonfiction market or its consumers, so it’s difficult to answer this question with any confidence. Anecdotally, I’ve heard many nonfiction publishers, especially textbook publishers, say DRM free is a nonstarter in their part of the industry. On the other hand, I’ve also heard fiction publishers say that.
On the fiction side, I think some of the hesitation from publishers comes not just from the publishers and their concerns with reader usage of DRM-free material, but also from the pressure they get from some authors and agents to continue the use of DRM because of their concerns with reader usage.
ES: Carina Press caters to niche and emerging reader markets. Do you worry about customers finishing a title and then passing it on digitally to a friend for free? Or do you see this as a way to build word of mouth?
AJ: Yes, I do see it as a way to build word of mouth. I’m going to use myself as an example. I’m an avid reader; in 2012, I read between 410-420 books. In short, I’m a publisher’s dream come true! But despite the fact that I’m willing to spend several thousand dollars a year on books, I still encounter many that I’d like to read but am hesitant to purchase because I’m uncertain of the author’s writing ability, storytelling ability, or whether I can trust her or him with plot elements. 
Being able to get the book from a friend (or a library!) allows me to experiment with authors, stories, and even genres I wouldn’t otherwise try. Because of the wide availability of books to choose from, if borrowing the book by some legitimate means isn’t available to me, I simply skip it. However, if I am able to borrow it, and enjoy it, I am willing in the future to become a paying customer of that author. If the author has a preexisting backlist, I’ll invest in the backlist.
I don’t think I’m that unique in this regard (perhaps unique in how much I read but not unique in wanting to be cautious of where I choose to spend my reading dollars).
ES: Ebook discovery is a hot topic in Library Land. Browsing a digital collection is an inherently different experience than perusing a physical bookshelf. Because of this, librarians are constantly thinking about how they can streamline ebook discovery. How do you market your digital-first titles to new audiences?
AJ: In many ways, digital-first marketing is much the same as marketing print. We advertise in key online places, as well as experiment with niche online places. We do etailer co-ops, seek out reviews, send newsletters, engage with our audience in social media channels, etc. But with the rise of digital and the rise of the reader also being online, we’re seeing how important word of mouth along with the right pricing strategy is. But if a title can generate excellent word of mouth, that’s the most valuable marketing! 
ES: Would you be open to a library purchasing Carina Press ebooks and then assigning their own in-house DRM to those titles?
AJ: You know, that’s something no one has ever asked me before. It’s a larger business decision, so we’d definitely be open to a discussion on the pros and cons of this. It would be a fascinating discussion!
ES: You are a self-proclaimed advocate for digital publishing; how does your point of view influence your stance on ebook lending models for libraries?
AJ: I think there are two things that predispose me to being a fan of ebook lending  in libraries. The first is that I’m, as I said earlier, an avid reader. So I definitely often see things with a reader and consumer’s viewpoint, even while understanding and evaluating from the publisher point of view.
The second is that I’ve been in digital publishing for a decade, so I’ve seen the growth of the industry and seen up close the readership changes. Both of these things make me a fan of libraries as well as a consumer of ebook lending via libraries myself.
ES: Finally, do you have any advice for publishers who are considering licensing their ebooks to libraries?
AJ: I wouldn’t presume to tell another publisher how to do business, so no true advice. Instead, I’ll say that being open to library lending has been advantageous for us in building relationships with the libraries, with authors (and for authors to build relationships with libraries) and with readers. 

LJ memoir columnist and star Tumblarian, Erin “Laser Fingers" Shea talks to Angela James, editor of Harlequin’s e-only imprint, Carina Press.

    cloudunbound:

    I’ve spent a goodly amount of February shining a giant pink light on Cloud partner Harlequin (see my overview of its series, Harlequin’s quick-and-dirty guide to erotica, and Cloud librarian Maureen Roberts’s interview with KISS author Kelly Hunter). Before the month of love and eros slips away, romance fans and publishing pundits of all platforms should, if they haven’t already, meet Angela James, executive editor of Harlequin’s digital-first, DRM-free imprint, Carina Press

    Below is Cloud librarian Erin Shea’s scintillating email conversation with James (pictured above, with e-reader in hand), who lives and dies by her intimate, enviable connection with the romance audience. She’s also a believer in the library as discovery center and holds forth with ten years of digital publishing experience on the relationship among word of mouth, digital marketing, libraries, and sales.

    ES: Carina Press is a “digital-first, DRM free” imprint of Harlequin. Would you explain what this means for library users downloading your ebooks?

    AJ: This actually means very positive things for library users, because Carina Press has chosen not to put DRM, or Digital Rights Management, on our titles, including those bought by libraries. This means library users can easily move the files they check out from the library to their device of choice. I have had a number of librarians tell me that, because of this, they often use Carina Press titles to demonstrate to patrons how to move files to a device, because we make it quite painless.

    ES: Your imprint primarily publishes genre fiction. Do you think genre fans consume their reading in a way that makes a DRM-free business model more sustainable than, say, nonfiction?

    AJ: I don’t consider myself an expert on the nonfiction market or its consumers, so it’s difficult to answer this question with any confidence. Anecdotally, I’ve heard many nonfiction publishers, especially textbook publishers, say DRM free is a nonstarter in their part of the industry. On the other hand, I’ve also heard fiction publishers say that.

    On the fiction side, I think some of the hesitation from publishers comes not just from the publishers and their concerns with reader usage of DRM-free material, but also from the pressure they get from some authors and agents to continue the use of DRM because of their concerns with reader usage.

    ES: Carina Press caters to niche and emerging reader markets. Do you worry about customers finishing a title and then passing it on digitally to a friend for free? Or do you see this as a way to build word of mouth?

    AJ: Yes, I do see it as a way to build word of mouth. I’m going to use myself as an example. I’m an avid reader; in 2012, I read between 410-420 books. In short, I’m a publisher’s dream come true! But despite the fact that I’m willing to spend several thousand dollars a year on books, I still encounter many that I’d like to read but am hesitant to purchase because I’m uncertain of the author’s writing ability, storytelling ability, or whether I can trust her or him with plot elements.

    Being able to get the book from a friend (or a library!) allows me to experiment with authors, stories, and even genres I wouldn’t otherwise try. Because of the wide availability of books to choose from, if borrowing the book by some legitimate means isn’t available to me, I simply skip it. However, if I am able to borrow it, and enjoy it, I am willing in the future to become a paying customer of that author. If the author has a preexisting backlist, I’ll invest in the backlist.

    I don’t think I’m that unique in this regard (perhaps unique in how much I read but not unique in wanting to be cautious of where I choose to spend my reading dollars).

    ES: Ebook discovery is a hot topic in Library Land. Browsing a digital collection is an inherently different experience than perusing a physical bookshelf. Because of this, librarians are constantly thinking about how they can streamline ebook discovery. How do you market your digital-first titles to new audiences?

    AJ: In many ways, digital-first marketing is much the same as marketing print. We advertise in key online places, as well as experiment with niche online places. We do etailer co-ops, seek out reviews, send newsletters, engage with our audience in social media channels, etc. But with the rise of digital and the rise of the reader also being online, we’re seeing how important word of mouth along with the right pricing strategy is. But if a title can generate excellent word of mouth, that’s the most valuable marketing! 

    ES: Would you be open to a library purchasing Carina Press ebooks and then assigning their own in-house DRM to those titles?

    AJ: You know, that’s something no one has ever asked me before. It’s a larger business decision, so we’d definitely be open to a discussion on the pros and cons of this. It would be a fascinating discussion!

    ES: You are a self-proclaimed advocate for digital publishing; how does your point of view influence your stance on ebook lending models for libraries?

    AJ: I think there are two things that predispose me to being a fan of ebook lending  in libraries. The first is that I’m, as I said earlier, an avid reader. So I definitely often see things with a reader and consumer’s viewpoint, even while understanding and evaluating from the publisher point of view.

    The second is that I’ve been in digital publishing for a decade, so I’ve seen the growth of the industry and seen up close the readership changes. Both of these things make me a fan of libraries as well as a consumer of ebook lending via libraries myself.

    ES: Finally, do you have any advice for publishers who are considering licensing their ebooks to libraries?

    AJ: I wouldn’t presume to tell another publisher how to do business, so no true advice. Instead, I’ll say that being open to library lending has been advantageous for us in building relationships with the libraries, with authors (and for authors to build relationships with libraries) and with readers. 

    LJ memoir columnist and star Tumblarian, Erin “Laser Fingers" Shea talks to Angela James, editor of Harlequin’s e-only imprint, Carina Press.

  14. bookmobility:

Steven Heller, at Print, just posted some excerpts from a 1919 satirical report by graphic design pioneer W.A. Dwiggins. Everything Heller has posted is worth a read (in the main, wonderfully rendered “documentary” interviews on the question of declining book design). But my favorite bit is what I’ve posted above, which Heller writes demonstrates that “Dwig did not mince fever lines.”
Indeed. And, perhaps more to the point, it’s beautifully done.

    bookmobility:

    Steven Heller, at Print, just posted some excerpts from a 1919 satirical report by graphic design pioneer W.A. Dwiggins. Everything Heller has posted is worth a read (in the main, wonderfully rendered “documentary” interviews on the question of declining book design). But my favorite bit is what I’ve posted above, which Heller writes demonstrates that “Dwig did not mince fever lines.”

    Indeed. And, perhaps more to the point, it’s beautifully done.

  15. Library Journal: Materials Mix: Investigating Trends in Materials Budgets and Circulation →

    booksyarnink:

    The materials breakdowns reported by this year’s respondents will come as no surprise to anyone who has set foot in a public library recently. Though materials budgets remained flat, averaging $765,000 and veering from $24,000 overall for libraries serving populations under 10,000 to nearly $4.5 million overall for libraries serving populations of 500,000 or more, total book budgets—averaging $449,800—have fallen. 

    Book budgets fell on average in every region but the South, and in some libraries—those serving populations of 100,000 to 499,999—the cuts were big, averaging more than four percent.”

    The statistics in here are not very surprising: budgets flat or falling, while circulation is going up. Print is dropping as more money is needing to be allocated to media and ebooks, along with drops in reference databases.

    Interesting looks at the role of marketing and social media in libraries, and how we are becoming — or really, have always been — a key promoter for books, in whatever form they are in.