1. Duke University Libraries Introduce “Digitize This Book” →

    nerdylikearockstar:

    Awesome strategy to keep digitization from becoming an overwhelming prospect—give priority to the books that are being requested in e-format. 

    Duke University Libraries say: “Starting this semester, Duke University faculty, students, and staff can request to have certain public domain books scanned on demand. If a book is published before 1923* and located in the Perkins, Bostock, Lilly, or Music Library or in the Library Service Center (LSC), a green “Digitize This Book” button will appear in its online catalog record. Clicking on this button starts the request. Within two weeks (although likely sooner), you will get an email with a link to the digitized book in the Duke University Libraries collections on the Internet Archive. You—and the rest of the world—can now read this book online, download it to your Kindle, export it as a PDF, or get it as a fully searchable text-only file. And you never have to worry about late fees or recalls!”

  2. libraryadvocates:

    Open Now: Free Copyright Webinar for School Librarians and Educators

    Can I copy a textbook that I have and make copies for my students? Can I be thrown in jail for copyright infringement? These are just some of the questions that educators and school librarians have about use of copyright law in school environments. Oftentimes, they do not receive helpful guidance on the subject, which leads them to make overly conservative decisions.

    To assist educators and librarians who prepare learning materials for students, the American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy will host Complete Copyright for K–12 Librarians and Educators, a free interactive webinar developed specifically for instructors and school librarians on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, from 4:00-5:00p.m. EST (Register now).

    Bestselling copyright authority Carrie Russell will host the webinar and discuss common copyright concerns explored in her newly released book of the same title. The webinar will offer clear guidance on ways to legally provide materials to students and explore scenarios often encountered by educators in schools, such as using copyrighted material in lesson plans, classroom assignments, school plays and performances.

    Webinar participants will learn:

    • Copyright must-knows for librarians and educators
    • Fair use
    • Creation of the copyright law
    • Use of copyright materials in school settings
    • Copyrighted content in the social media age

    Please note that there are 50 spaces available for the webinar, and the registration deadline closes December 3, 2012. Registration for the free webinar is available now. Webinar participants who register in advance will receive a 10 percent discount on their purchase of the book, Complete Copyright for K–12 Librarians and Educators.

  3. schoollibraryjournal:

Got Jane Austen?
GalleyCat has created a diagram of the “Top 50 Free Ebooks at Project Gutenberg.”
There’s links to the books on the blog, and titles include everything from Beowulf to Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

    schoollibraryjournal:

    Got Jane Austen?

    GalleyCat has created a diagram of the “Top 50 Free Ebooks at Project Gutenberg.

    There’s links to the books on the blog, and titles include everything from Beowulf to Grimm’s Fairy Tales.