1. cloudunbound:

Pew Internet released its latest report yesterday focusing on “younger Americans” (ages 16-29), and librarians are abuzz about their lingering connection with print and traditional services.
Some much-cited stats from the report:
75% of Americans ages 16-29 read at least one book in print in the past year
25% read at least one e-book
14% listened to at least one audiobook
But as the above chart shows, 54 percent of that same demographic wants libraries to offer a “broader selection of ebooks.” An issue in their reading ebooks may be that most ebook collections are heavily skewed toward adults.
Of course, a huge obstacle in intelligently collecting ebooks for younger readers is the metadata: the publisher-assigned BISAC codes label everything as “juvenile,” when librarians make distinctions among content for children (ages 0-7), juveniles (ages 8-12), and young adults (ages 13-18). Searching for and discovering just the right stuff is a slog, in other words, and that’s why I take great pains in my marketing to identify what is good for who and why.
More later on this massively crucial topic. 

    cloudunbound:

    Pew Internet released its latest report yesterday focusing on “younger Americans” (ages 16-29), and librarians are abuzz about their lingering connection with print and traditional services.

    Some much-cited stats from the report:

    • 75% of Americans ages 16-29 read at least one book in print in the past year
    • 25% read at least one e-book
    • 14% listened to at least one audiobook

    But as the above chart shows, 54 percent of that same demographic wants libraries to offer a “broader selection of ebooks.” An issue in their reading ebooks may be that most ebook collections are heavily skewed toward adults.

    Of course, a huge obstacle in intelligently collecting ebooks for younger readers is the metadata: the publisher-assigned BISAC codes label everything as “juvenile,” when librarians make distinctions among content for children (ages 0-7), juveniles (ages 8-12), and young adults (ages 13-18). Searching for and discovering just the right stuff is a slog, in other words, and that’s why I take great pains in my marketing to identify what is good for who and why.

    More later on this massively crucial topic. 

  2. LIBRARY FOR ALL: a digital library for the developing world by Library For All — Kickstarter

    The library brings together content from Open Source providers and top global publishers. It is designed for low-bandwidth environments through the use of a local network topology. The platform is designed to be device agnostic. That means it can be accessed via mobile phones, e-readers or even low-cost tablets.

    I met the nice people of Library for All at BEA on Friday. Check out all the cool things they are doing!

  3. therumpus:

    Are you following Journos of Color, the latest brainchild from Aminatou Sow and Jamelle Bouie? Because you should.

    Signal boost!

  4. Why Did It Happen? Books to Help Kids Cope with Tragedy | School Library Journal →

    kishizuka:

    A select list by SLJ’s book review team created after the Newtown tragedy - sadly, an appropriate resource once again.

  5. Fancy Face: Libraries mentioned in one of the most important articles of 2013 →

    fancylibrarian:

    image

    "For decades, prominent gay-rights activists dismissed the right to marry as a quixotic, even dangerous, cause and gave no support to the men and women at the grassroots who launched the uphill movement.

    "Instead, the impetus has come from disparate forces in seemingly unconnected realms: courtrooms, yes, but also hospitals, nurseries,libraries and soundstages. The rise of same-sex marriage from joke to commonplace is a story of converging strands of history. Changes in law and politics, medicine and demographics, popular culture and ivory-tower scholarship all added momentum to produce widespread changes of heart.”

    How Gay Marriage Won - David Von Drehl, Time Magazine March 28, 2013

    Way to be forward thinking you guys, may libraries will always be a place where empathy, compassion, understanding, and knowledge is fostered are encouraged.

    I am looking for the day when my family members and friends will be able to marry the person they love because let’s face it: those weddings will be fabulous.

    Yes.

  6. This positive first decision by one of the antitrust authorities is an important milestone on the path to uniting two of the world’s leading publishing companies into a truly global publishing group. It will enable investments worldwide in new digital publishing models, in new distribution paths, products and services and in the major growth markets.

    — 

    Thomas Rabe, chairman and chief executive of Bertelsmann, in his statement about the Department of Justice’s approval of the Random House-Penguin merger last week. I missed this owing to a Valentine’s Day spreadsheet massacre of my own doing.

    This just in: the EU will have made its decision about the merger by April 15.

    What’s it all mean for libraries? I wouldn’t profess to know at this stage, but I’m not wary. I’m hoping at the very least it will mean a continuation of the trust that Random House and Penguin have demonstrated as separate entities.

    (via cloudunbound)

  7. While the Internet makes it easier to share opinions in writing, it also makes it harder for a publisher to sue its way toward a good reputation, because once word gets out, any number of librarians and scholars confirm in writing, loudly, exactly what the defendant in the suit is being sued for saying,” she said. “The number of librarians who will never buy a book published by Mellen and the number of scholars who will avoid ever signing a contract with them went up enormously as a result of their nuisance suit. This is not a business plan I would recommend to publishers.

    — 

    Another publisher accuses a librarian of libel | Inside Higher Ed (via infoneer-pulse)

    Yuck.

  8. Press Roundup: Mellen Press Libel Lawsuits vs. Librarian and McMaster University | LJ INFOdocket →

    There has been a lot of coverage in the past week regarding two lawsuits filed by Edwin Mellen Press that names Dale Askey, Associate University Librarian, Library & Learning Technologies at McMaster University and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario as defendants.

    The suit stems from a blog post by Askey on his Bibliobrary.net blog in 2010.

    In the past day the story has started to get coverage in non-library or higher education sources. The Hamilton Spectator post (linked below) includes a few comments from Dale Askey.

    Click through for a roundup of press coverage, statements of support, and other materials.

  9. The copyright in most of these works is owned by our faculty members, and it is well past time that we just refused to transfer those rights to commercial entities that undermine our best interests.

    — 

    Kevin Smith at Duke draws the right conclusion from the ongoing outrage of the lawsuit against GSU.

    Full blog post: Law and politics in the GSU case | Scholarly Communications @ Duke

    (via arlpolicynotes)

  10. 

Nearly 1.6 million people were in federal or state prisons in 2011, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. City and county jails are also full of people. Though there are increasingly vocal calls to reevaluate stiff sentencing for less serious crimes, this is unlikely to cause a dramatic decline in prisoners anytime soon. Meanwhile, each day, thousands return to their communities from some form of incarceration.
What is changing is a growing realization that more public, prison, and jail libraries can better identify and serve the often significant needs of inmates or those prisoners who are returning to their communities. Not only are some libraries providing books, they are providing innovative programs and services, helping inmates and returnees to learn about work and employment opportunities, the arts and to develop job-seeking skills.


Prison and Libraries: Public Service Inside and Out
I am so so excited about this feature in the February 1st issue of LJ. Read it! And then do something to help out the members of your community that are incarcerated.

    Nearly 1.6 million people were in federal or state prisons in 2011, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. City and county jails are also full of people. Though there are increasingly vocal calls to reevaluate stiff sentencing for less serious crimes, this is unlikely to cause a dramatic decline in prisoners anytime soon. Meanwhile, each day, thousands return to their communities from some form of incarceration.

    What is changing is a growing realization that more public, prison, and jail libraries can better identify and serve the often significant needs of inmates or those prisoners who are returning to their communities. Not only are some libraries providing books, they are providing innovative programs and services, helping inmates and returnees to learn about work and employment opportunities, the arts and to develop job-seeking skills.

    Prison and Libraries: Public Service Inside and Out

    I am so so excited about this feature in the February 1st issue of LJRead it! And then do something to help out the members of your community that are incarcerated.

  11. 
Islamist rebels have burnt down a library full of ancient manuscripts in the Malian town of Timbuktu as they fled, according to officials. The South African-funded library contained thousands of priceless documents dating back to the 13th century. “The rebels sit fire to the newly-constructed Ahmed Baba Institute built by the South Africans … this happened four days ago,” Timbuktu Mayor Halle Ousmane Ciffe told Reuters by telephone from Bamako. According to the official, he received the information from his chief of communications, who had traveled south from the town on Sunday. The manuscripts were being kept in two different locations, an old warehouse and a new research center – the Ahmed Baba Institute. Both buildings were burned down, according to the mayor, who was unable to say immediately if any of the manuscripts had survived in fire. Named after a Timbuktu-born contemporary of William Shakespeare, the Ahmed Baba Institute housed more than 20,000 scholarly manuscripts. Some were stored in underground vaults.

Torch and go: Islamists burn down rare manuscript library in Timbuktu — RT

    Islamist rebels have burnt down a library full of ancient manuscripts in the Malian town of Timbuktu as they fled, according to officials. The South African-funded library contained thousands of priceless documents dating back to the 13th century. “The rebels sit fire to the newly-constructed Ahmed Baba Institute built by the South Africans … this happened four days ago,” Timbuktu Mayor Halle Ousmane Ciffe told Reuters by telephone from Bamako. According to the official, he received the information from his chief of communications, who had traveled south from the town on Sunday. The manuscripts were being kept in two different locations, an old warehouse and a new research center – the Ahmed Baba Institute. Both buildings were burned down, according to the mayor, who was unable to say immediately if any of the manuscripts had survived in fire. Named after a Timbuktu-born contemporary of William Shakespeare, the Ahmed Baba Institute housed more than 20,000 scholarly manuscripts. Some were stored in underground vaults.

    Torch and go: Islamists burn down rare manuscript library in Timbuktu — RT

  12. Was It “Write An Article About Libraries” Week?

    By 

    Maybe it was just a slow news week between Christmas and New Year’s, causing editors to pull out the evergreen (pardon the pun) articles. But this past week has been a big one for thinky pieces about the future of libraries in the mainstream media. There’s nothing much new here for the plugged-in librarian, but there may be much that you’ve long been grappling with that patrons are now hearing for the first time. So if you’ve been offline for the holidays, here’s what you missed:

    The New York Times ran two, Libraries See Opening as Bookstores Close and the accompanying Room for Debate: Do We Still Need Libraries?

    (Before the title raises your blood pressure as it did mine, all the debaters agree that we do, though they call out different aspects of what libraries do and one, at least, feels that libraries shouldn’t be bearing the brunt of providing Internet access. Two of the commenters are from within the library world: Luis Herrera, city librarian of San Francisco and LJ’s 2012 Librarian of the Year, and Buffy J. Hamilton, newly appointed learning strategist for the Cleveland Public Library and LJ 2011 Mover & Shaker.)

    John Palfrey, head of school at Philips Andover Academy, explains why this question is up for debate at all, and suggests how to make the case for libraries most effectively to those who are asking the question.

    Meanwhile, NPR weighed in on the perennial ebooks for libraries quagmire with Libraries And E-Lending: The ‘Wild West’ Of Digital Licensing?, including an interview with former Library Journal and School Library Journal editorial director, Brian Kenney. And in case your holidays started as early as Hannukah this year, on December 11, Forbes visited the same subject with The Wrong War Over eBooks: Publishers Vs. Libraries, positing that pay-per-circ could be just the compromise model publishers and libraries have been searching for.

    The Washington Post eschewed controversy and stuck to human interest with a piece on reading to therapy dogs.

  13. HEY TUMBLR, it's the Tumblr vs Twitter race to $1000 for EveryLibrary! →

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    Attention tumblarians, library-loving tumblrers, and all the internet friends: today kicks off a one-week fundraiser to $1000 to benefit EveryLibrary, the first and only national organization dedicated exclusively to political action at a local level to create, renew, and protect public funding for libraries of all types.

    In order to maximize our efforts,Tumblr is taking on the Twitter community in a race to $1k, from today until next Tuesday, November 20th.

    Help today, help tomorrow.

    Why does EveryLibrary need our help? Funding raised this week will go towards the necessary personnel and resources needed to do voter analysis on library ballot measures which were voted on across the country during the election. What EL learns from this election will have a critical impact on our strategy of support for future library endeavors on the ballot. Cool and important, right?

    Even cooler, if you can’t give cash right now, we’ve partnered with Urban Libraries Unite (an incredible org, check it out) in supporting their book drive which is currently seeking new and good condition used children’s books and new unmarked children’s coloring and activity books (with crayons if possible), to go out to young victims of the storm who are currently in shelters in New York City. Material donations should be directed here.

    If you’re feeling particularly philanthropic this week, ULU is also looking for cash donations, as is the New Jersey Library Association Relief project.

    Please consider giving what you can. Chip in $5 or $10—or donate books to support Sandy victims.

    To contribute to the #tumblarian EveryLibrary race to 1k (WHICH I HAVE EVERY CONFIDENCE WE CAN CLEAN UP WELL BEFORE NEXT TUESDAY), please click through the link above or here.

    Give us a like, a reblog, a shout out to your friends and family. Think about it: all we need is about 100 folks to find $10 or so for the cause. Let’s have fun, do good work for EveryLibrary, and flex these Tumblarian muscles. Let us also show Twitter what’s up.

    To learn more about EveryLibrary (and to share the good news with your generous friends) please visit here.

    YES YES YES

  14. How did the election impact your libraries?

    everylibrary:

    EveryLibrary is working to build a full national report on library ballot pass/fails. Help us out by replying with what happened in your races. The next step is voter segmentation and message analysis. We need more wins for libraries in 2013 and 2014.

    Every library matters.

  15. Personal Journalist Accounts Preferred on Twitter →

    infoneer-pulse:

    In both Egypt and Tunisia, bloggers, journalists and activists were the most prominent in disseminating information, accounting together for 43% of the accounts tweeting about Egypt and 44% tweeting about Tunisia, versus just 7% representing mainstream media accounts in each of the countries.

    This sheds an interesting light on how Twitter is being used in journalism . While all major mainstream media outlets have a strong presence on Twitter, some with millions of followers, when it comes to how information spreads through Twitter – when it’s coming from personal, individual accounts, it is likely to reach a larger audience.

    In the case of both Tunisia and Egypt, it is possible that having journalists on the ground, reporting directly from their Twitter accounts made for more immediate impressions. While any journalist probably has to be cautious about what they say on Twitter, the immediacy of reaching their readers through tweets, in the heat of the moment, is far more honest.

    » via The Next Web