1. willywaldo:

    Don’t Touch My Records! - Diner (by senorrogers)

    So this is a cataloging librarian’s worst nightmare (or an anal-retentive husband’s), but this is such a great scene with a young Ellen Barkin and Daniel Stern.

    SHREVIE: Have you been playing my records?

    BETH: Yeah, so?
    SHREVIE: So didn’t I tell you the procedure?

    BETH: Yeah you told me all about it Shrevie, they have to be in alphabetical order.

    SHREVIE: And what else?
    BETH: Ugh they have to be filed alphabetically and according to year is what, ok?

    SHREVIE: And what else?  What else?

    BETH: I don’t know.

    SHREVIE: You don’t know. Well let me give you a hint, ok? I found my James Brown record filed under the “J”s, instead of the “B”s.  I don’t know who taught you to alphabetize. But to top it off he’s in the rock and roll section instead of the R&B section.  How could you do that?

    BETH: It’s too complicated Shrevie. See, every time I pull out a record there’s this whole procedure I have to go through.  I just want to hear the music, that’s all.

    Does your significant other have a special cataloging system for their music? One of my favorite “Library Journal moments” in cinema!

  2. knmajorblogs:

Here it is—the coolest poster I have ever owned, or ever will own.

    knmajorblogs:

    Here it is—the coolest poster I have ever owned, or ever will own.

  3. cloudunbound:

librarianslikenoise:

Alright, librarians. Spread the word. This is gonna be totally insane, totally unsanctioned, and totally rad. There’s still room for more performers, so if you’re a noise-making library worker, and you’ll be in Chicago for ALA, send an email to stevekemple at gmail dot com and be all like “hey I wanna perform” and I’ll be all like “heck yeah let’s do it!”

Here’s what you call a deeply non-traditional bit of ALA programming: noise-loving librarians make noise. I think I know the minds behind this, and they are elegantly twisted. I am going to show up a bit late with earplugs.

Legitimately the coolest thing at ALA maybe. Maybe.

    cloudunbound:

    librarianslikenoise:

    Alright, librarians. Spread the word. This is gonna be totally insane, totally unsanctioned, and totally rad. There’s still room for more performers, so if you’re a noise-making library worker, and you’ll be in Chicago for ALA, send an email to stevekemple at gmail dot com and be all like “hey I wanna perform” and I’ll be all like “heck yeah let’s do it!”

    Here’s what you call a deeply non-traditional bit of ALA programming: noise-loving librarians make noise. I think I know the minds behind this, and they are elegantly twisted. I am going to show up a bit late with earplugs.

    Legitimately the coolest thing at ALA maybe. Maybe.

  4. Tanisha Mitchell, Hitting the High Notes | Library Journal Movers & Shakers

The collection was inspiring, but it was also virtually uncataloged. She began research to see if the Met was unusual and discovered that very few opera houses have systems in place to catalog their holdings. “Tanisha moved into action,” says ­Robinson.
Soon hired to work part-time at the Met, Mitchell began organizing these precious works. Since then, she’s cataloged roughly 170 pieces of sheet music and songbooks, more than 200 manuscripts (scores and parts), and about 1,000 rare piano-vocal scores and full scores.

    Tanisha Mitchell, Hitting the High Notes | Library Journal Movers & Shakers

    The collection was inspiring, but it was also virtually uncataloged. She began research to see if the Met was unusual and discovered that very few opera houses have systems in place to catalog their holdings. “Tanisha moved into action,” says ­Robinson.

    Soon hired to work part-time at the Met, Mitchell began organizing these precious works. Since then, she’s cataloged roughly 170 pieces of sheet music and songbooks, more than 200 manuscripts (scores and parts), and about 1,000 rare piano-vocal scores and full scores.

  5. newberrylibrary:

    The Newberry—you may be surprised to learn—has a remarkable collection of musical scores and ephemera. Above, you’ll find three of our most lauded treasures: a handwritten aria by a nine-year-old Mozart (check out that penmanship!); a first edition of Jacopo Peri’s Euridice, considered to be the first extant opera score; and Scott Joplin’s Euphonic Sounds, which brought ragtime into the respectable mainstream.

    If these musical curios tickle your fancy, be sure to check out this year’s Renaissance Center NEH Summer Institute, “Music and Travel in Europe and the Americas, 1500 - 1800.” The institute, geared toward college and university professors, runs from July 15 to August 9 and includes a $3,300 stipend.

  6. From NY Daily News, Shush! Brooklyn librarians form band and rock out:
“We’re not your father’s and mother’s librarians,” said Cole. “A lot of us are the really creative types.”
The band of bookworms regularly play at a slew of promotional library events all over the city, including The Coney Island Blues Festival, the Literacy Banquet at the Central Library and in City Hall Park during National Library Week.

(c/o thePinakes & featuring @ScrewyDecimal)

    From NY Daily News, Shush! Brooklyn librarians form band and rock out:

    “We’re not your father’s and mother’s librarians,” said Cole. “A lot of us are the really creative types.”

    The band of bookworms regularly play at a slew of promotional library events all over the city, including The Coney Island Blues Festival, the Literacy Banquet at the Central Library and in City Hall Park during National Library Week.

    (c/o thePinakes & featuring @ScrewyDecimal)

  7. Can You Get To That?: A Great Library Roadmix →

    Alright friends and friendly strangers, here’s a mix in full for you today. Listen to it on your way to PLA & most especially while you follow the exploits of the Great Library Roadshow. Download here.

    Here’s a tracklist:

    Roy Ayers - We Live in Brooklyn, Baby

    The The - This Is the Day

    Gil Scott-Heron & Jamie xx - I’ll Take Care Of You

    Taj Mahal - (Clara) St. Kitts Woman

    Toots & the Maytals - Pressure Drop

    Jorge Ben - Taj Mahal

    Asiko Rock Group - Lagos City

    Zafra Bros - Can I See You Tonight

    Sam Sparro - Clingwrap

    Cyril Neville - Tell Me What’s on Your Mind

    Honey & the Bees - Come Get It

    Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band - Solution for Pollution

    B’Ham Rhythm Section - I’ve Been Lonely For So Long

    Youssou N’Dour - Yalaye Dogal

    Tim Maia - Não Quero Dinheiro (Só Quero Amar)

    The Action 13 - More Bread to the People

    Masterplan - Clinton Park

    Funkadelic - Can You Get to That