1. therumpus:

lastbookiloved:

What Was the Last Book You Loved? We Want Your Essays!
We’re excited to announce a Tumblr Storyboard + The Rumpus partnership to highlight Tumblr writers and the books they love — an extension of The Rumpus’s ongoing “Last Book I Loved” series. Here’s how it works: Got a book you can’t stop thinking about? Send us a writeup – a little bit book review and a lot about why you loved it – along with a short bio. Beginning next month, we’ll publish our favorites every Friday, both on Storyboard and TheRumpus.net. Visit our SUBMIT PAGE for more information — and get reading!
(Card catalogue scan from the Palatina Library at the Biblioteca Nazionale in Florence.)

Hello and welcome. We, The Rumpus (+ Rumblr) and Tumblr, have teamed up to make something great. Do this. You won’t regret it.

I just gotta say, talking about books you love is something librarians are really good at. Help The Rumpus and Tumblr help you become bookternet famous.

    therumpus:

    lastbookiloved:

    What Was the Last Book You Loved? We Want Your Essays!

    We’re excited to announce a Tumblr Storyboard + The Rumpus partnership to highlight Tumblr writers and the books they love — an extension of The Rumpus’s ongoing “Last Book I Loved” series. Here’s how it works: Got a book you can’t stop thinking about? Send us a writeup – a little bit book review and a lot about why you loved it – along with a short bio. Beginning next month, we’ll publish our favorites every Friday, both on Storyboard and TheRumpus.net. Visit our SUBMIT PAGE for more information — and get reading!

    (Card catalogue scan from the Palatina Library at the Biblioteca Nazionale in Florence.)

    Hello and welcome. We, The Rumpus (+ Rumblr) and Tumblr, have teamed up to make something great. Do this. You won’t regret it.

    I just gotta say, talking about books you love is something librarians are really good at. Help The Rumpus and Tumblr help you become bookternet famous.

    (Source: )

  2. Hurricane Sandy’s Austerity Lessons →

    willywaldo:

    “While surely unintentional, this natural disaster has afforded those affected by it a small taste of how countless others around the rest of the world live – and many not just during a crisis, but on a regular basis.”

    My friend Lucine wrote a powerful essay on the importance of “altruism, charity, and solidarity in the face of adversity to guide and inspire us if and when disaster comes along.” A Thanksgiving must-read.

  3. Michelle Dean: BULLHORN: Free New Yorker articles! →

    newyorker:

    Up and down the East Coast, offices are closing ahead of Hurricane Sandy, and millions of workers are preparing to pretend to work from home. If you’re one of them, let us distract you with this rainy-day reading list. A few of these articles are hurricane-related; others just perfect for enjoying a slightly scary day at home: 

    High Water,” from October 3, 2005.
    David Remnick on how Presidents and citizens react to disaster.

    Atchafalaya: The Control of Nature,” from February 23, 1987.
    John McPhee on controlling the Mississippi River.

    The Fifty-Nine Story Crisis,” from May 29, 1995.
    Joe Morgenstern on an engineer’s worst nightmare: realizing that a skyscraper you’ve designed might collapse in a hurricane.

    Up and Then Down,” from April 21, 2008.
    Nick Paumgarten on the secret lives of elevators.

    A Murder Foretold,” from April 4, 2011.
    David Grann on one man’s race to stop his own assassination.

    Looking at War,” from December 9, 2002.
    Susan Sontag on photography’s view of devastation and death.

    Secrets of the Magus,” from April 5, 1993.
    Mark Singer on Ricky Jay, the world’s greatest sleight-of-hand magician.

    Advanced Placement,” from March 10, 2008.
    Janet Malcolm on the wicked joy of the “Gossip Girl” novels.

    Good Raymond,” from October 5, 1998.
    Richard Ford on his friendship with Raymond Carver.

    “The Power Broker,” from July and August, 1974: Parts onetwothree, and four.
    Robert Carto on Robert Moses and New York.

    Please stop everything you are doing and read John McPhee’s “Atchafalaya: The Control of Nature.” NOW! 

  4. I have always loved best books with magic in them, more than books about space or the future or any other rule-bending, world-shaping force. And why? There are a lot of things that often come bound up in books with magic, whether it is a quasi-medieval setting (abrim with monarchies, chivalry), or the literal escape some characters make from their own lives (the Pevensie children to Narnia, Harry Potter to Hogwarts), or the material comforts magic often furnishes (the Abhorsen’s house in Sabriel), or a demonstrably real—if not totally understood—universal order. But Harry Potter is without kings and Westeros affords few people escape; Juniper’s Euny lives in poverty and Pern is a world without religion.

    — Your LJ tumblrer wrote an essay about asthma, magic, and the computer game Baldur’s Gate over at the Rumpus.