1. vintageanchorbooks:

Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.
Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.
More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

By the way, Adichie’s Americanah is on the fiction shortlist for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medal.
Good luck to all the nominees.

    vintageanchorbooks:

    Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.

    Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.

    More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

    By the way, Adichie’s Americanah is on the fiction shortlist for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medal.

    Good luck to all the nominees.

  2. Booker Prize: Eleanor Catton becomes youngest winner for The Luminaries →

    The New Zealander was 25 when she began writing The Luminaries, an epic 19th-century gold rush murder mystery. Now 28, she also becomes an “end of an era” winner: the last recipient of a Booker prize which, for 45 years, has only allowed Commonwealth and Irish writers – next year, the Americans are coming.

    Tumblrarians, have you ordered copies yet? I do wonder how well this “doorstopper” at 832 pages will do with U.S. readers.

    This year’s chair of judges, the writer and critic Robert Macfarlane, admitted readers needed to make a “huge investment” in the doorstopping book; it is challenging with a slow start but the dividends were more than worth it.

    "We have returned to it three times," he said. "We have dug into it and the yield it has offered at each new reading has been extraordinary."

  3. 
In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods feels very much like a work of literary fiction to me (though I think we all map those genres out in our own idiosyncratic and personal ways), just one that uses its tools in different ways, to different ends. Where on the literary landscape do you feel like this book comes from? Do you think very much about categorization when you write?
What I would like to think is that the story works as both a myth or a fairy tale and also [as] a sort of strange and heavily filtered realism. In other words, while the setting and the actions of the book are mythical in nature, my hope is that the emotions at the center of the book’s marriage are recognizable as belonging not just to the book’s world but to ours. For instance, it’s not only my narrator who discovers, after being married, that he hasn’t before considered how to actually be a husband, or who discovers, after having children, that he doesn’t know how to be a father.
In an interview, David Foster Wallace once said that realistic fiction’s job is the opposite of what it once was: “no longer making the strange familiar but making the familiar strange again.” That fairly accurately describes what I also see as the task of writing successful fiction: not to reflect the real world directly but to create a world inside the book, with the new world’s mysteries and wonders offering a space where we might more easily confront the world we’re from, in all the emotional, moral, and intellectual complexity it deserves.

Fiction: Q & A Matt Bell | February 2013
I really loved Matt Bell’s In the House upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods, so I reviewed it, made it one of my editor’s picks, AND I interviewed Bell himself. This is about as ringing an endorsement as I can muster, folks. Read the book!

    In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods feels very much like a work of literary fiction to me (though I think we all map those genres out in our own idiosyncratic and personal ways), just one that uses its tools in different ways, to different ends. Where on the literary landscape do you feel like this book comes from? Do you think very much about categorization when you write?

    What I would like to think is that the story works as both a myth or a fairy tale and also [as] a sort of strange and heavily filtered realism. In other words, while the setting and the actions of the book are mythical in nature, my hope is that the emotions at the center of the book’s marriage are recognizable as belonging not just to the book’s world but to ours. For instance, it’s not only my narrator who discovers, after being married, that he hasn’t before considered how to actually be a husband, or who discovers, after having children, that he doesn’t know how to be a father.

    In an interview, David Foster Wallace once said that realistic fiction’s job is the opposite of what it once was: “no longer making the strange familiar but making the familiar strange again.” That fairly accurately describes what I also see as the task of writing successful fiction: not to reflect the real world directly but to create a world inside the book, with the new world’s mysteries and wonders offering a space where we might more easily confront the world we’re from, in all the emotional, moral, and intellectual complexity it deserves.

    Fiction: Q & A Matt Bell | February 2013

    I really loved Matt Bell’s In the House upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods, so I reviewed it, made it one of my editor’s picks, AND I interviewed Bell himself. This is about as ringing an endorsement as I can muster, folks. Read the book!

  4. "The truth is, women who write literary fiction frequently find themselves in an unjust world, even as young single women are outearning men in major American cities and higher education in the United States is skewing female. As VIDA, a women’s literary organization, showed in February in its second annual statistical roundup, women get shockingly short shrift as reviewers and reviewees in most prestigious publications. Of all the authors reviewed in the publications it tracked, nearly three-fourths were men. No wonder that when we talk about today’s leading novelists — the ones who generate heat and conversation and are read by both men and women — we are talking mostly about men.

    [T]he top tier of literary fiction — where the air is rich and the view is great and where a book enters the public imagination and the current conversation — tends to feel peculiarly, disproportionately male. Will the literary habits of a culture change as younger readers take over? Will more literary women be able to persuade their publishers to keep that photo of a longhaired young girl in a summer dress facing shyly away from the camera off their book jackets and replace it with a neutral illustration and bold typeface? Will VIDA’s statistics dramatically improve? And will “Women’s Fiction” become such an absurd category it’s phased out entirely? Maybe, in a more just world.”

    -Meg Wolitzer’s "The Second Shelf: On the Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women"

  5. "There is a market for literary/whatever books right now."

    "There is a market for literary/whatever books right now."

  6. "No dragons on the cover, thank you."

    "No dragons on the cover, thank you."

  7. Holla short fiction!

    Holla short fiction!