1. First Day on the Job

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    On the desk for my first official shift. Can you smell the librarianing? SO FRESH.

  2. WHEN A BOOK IS SHELVED IN THE WRONG SECTION

    dukeofbookingham:

    I’m just like:

    image

  3. Conan the librarian of the 22nd century?

    Conan the librarian of the 22nd century?

    (Source: warhammer40k.wikia.com)

  4. How Diverse is Librarianship? Check Out the Stats. →

    Clearly there is more work to be done in building a more diverse profession.

  5. missrumphiusproject:

uispeccoll:

thepinakes:

thepinakes:

johnxlibris:

Found a wooden book in the stacks

Questions! I have them!
This looks old. How long ago did someone hide this joke in the stacks?
Reference section! More evidence that print reference is dying?
Librarian, library staff, or patron? I thinking someone who worked in the library given the spine label etc.
Why that call number/title/ etc.?

Sadly, my questions were answered (by a Facebook friend of John’s), and it’s way less exciting than I hoped. It’s a book dummy used to hold the place of an in-use reference item so other browsers would know it existed — an outdated practice in modern libraries, but in this case one somehow survived on the shelves. With a sarcastic scrawl on the front.

Interesting history!  What will you do with it now?

I knew this! (That is all.)

Tumblarians, do you still use book dummies in your collections?

    missrumphiusproject:

    uispeccoll:

    thepinakes:

    thepinakes:

    johnxlibris:

    Found a wooden book in the stacks

    Questions! I have them!

    • This looks old. How long ago did someone hide this joke in the stacks?
    • Reference section! More evidence that print reference is dying?
    • Librarian, library staff, or patron? I thinking someone who worked in the library given the spine label etc.
    • Why that call number/title/ etc.?

    Sadly, my questions were answered (by a Facebook friend of John’s), and it’s way less exciting than I hoped. It’s a book dummy used to hold the place of an in-use reference item so other browsers would know it existed — an outdated practice in modern libraries, but in this case one somehow survived on the shelves. With a sarcastic scrawl on the front.

    Interesting history!  What will you do with it now?

    I knew this! (That is all.)

    Tumblarians, do you still use book dummies in your collections?

    (Source: johnxlibris)

  6. Things don't change much... →

    pcsweeney:

    We have learned that vision and imagination are priceless qualities for librarians to possess, vision to look into the future and picture the possibilities, imagination to determine the essentials…Most librarians hampered by small funds, swamped with trifling details, burdened by…

  7. uispeccoll:

Fine Books Magazine profiled our own Patrick Olson as a “Bright Young Librarian.”  Read all about it!
Thoughts on the future of special collections librarianship?

I think the future is looking good. Use statistics are generally up and the demand for rare materials sure isn’t letting up. Our instructors at Iowa are increasingly interested in bringing their students to special collections, and our administrators really seem to understand the unique value these collections add to the institution. Methods for delivering content are fast evolving, and probably always will, but people are constantly finding new and important ways to study and appreciate the originals.

    uispeccoll:

    Fine Books Magazine profiled our own Patrick Olson as a “Bright Young Librarian.”  Read all about it!

    Thoughts on the future of special collections librarianship?
    I think the future is looking good. Use statistics are generally up and the demand for rare materials sure isn’t letting up. Our instructors at Iowa are increasingly interested in bringing their students to special collections, and our administrators really seem to understand the unique value these collections add to the institution. Methods for delivering content are fast evolving, and probably always will, but people are constantly finding new and important ways to study and appreciate the originals.

  8. LJ Movers & Shakers 2014: Nomination Guidelines →

    From librarians to vendors to others who work in the library field, Movers and Shakers 2014 will celebrate the new professionals who are moving our libraries ahead.

    The 2014 Movers and Shakers will be highlighted in the March 15 issue of Library Journal and celebrated a luncheon during ALA Annual 2014 in Las Vegas.

    Did someone say Las Vegas? We want to hear from you now!

    Tell us about your friends and colleagues helping to build their library’s future so we can let the world know.

    image


    (Source: addtoany.com)

  9. This Week in Libraries: Erik Boekesteijn and Jaap van de Geer, founders of TWIL →

    LJ is pleased to continue its partnership with Erik Boekesteijn and Jaap van de Geer (Movers & Shakers 2009) to bring you monthly highlights from their video interview series, This Week in Libraries.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  10. Pennsylvania: All Gone! Harrisburg School Library Staff Eliminated With Recent Layoffs →

    idea-lab:

    I weep for the academic librarians who will see these kids on their campuses in the next 10 years.

    Sorry for being such a Debbie Downer on Monday morning, but InfoDocket editor Gary Docket urges librarians to do a better job of explaining to their communities their vital role in a 21st-century world.

    While volunteers are appreciated the library community overall has done a poor job explaining what librarians do and are capable of in the 21st century. We must do better.

    We’re all members of the community/profession and the type of library you work in should not play a role, we all have to support each other,  a united front works best. The public sees and hears “library” and often (if at all) makes distinctions about the specific type.

    We all know and understand the vital importance of school librarians today, they’re more vital than ever. The challenge is essential that we explain and demonstrate this to the public beginning now today.

  11. "Recent data shows that students are usually compiling bibliographies, outlining papers, and synthesizing research between 8 and 10 p.m. during the school week. In other words, students tend to work when most libraries are closed.

    How do they compensate? According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, many students are using free WiFi at McDonald’s restaurants to do schoolwork. There are almost as many WiFi access points in McDonald’s (12,000) as there are in public libraries (15,000) in the United States.”

    — 

    Emily Gover & Caity Selleck, ”Open Late for Student Study: Librarians Must Be Available When Kids Do Schoolwork — At Night” (SLJ, 7/13)

    I am so conflicted about this because, um, I want to be at home from 8 to 10 p.m. (Although I will so totally work a Saturday shift, no sweat.) This is one of the big places where you see the difficulty of librarianship being a capital-P-Profession but also customer-driven. Like, there’s this temptation I’ve noticed for some librarians to say, “This is a grown-up, white-collar, masters-requiring job, so I should only work 9-5. It’s not McDonalds.” And that just doesn’t meet our patrons’ needs.

    (via thecardiganlibrarian)

    Another issue is that it costs money to keep a library open beyond normal 9-5 business hours. While a number of academic libraries offer 24-hour study rooms, how do public libraries deal with this issue? Would you, dear Tumblrarians, be willing to work a midnight-to-dawn shift?

  12. To be as good as you want to be and to further your goals in providing the best service and experience as a librarian, you have to suck it up and stick to your beliefs.

    — Letters to a Young Librarian: You’re Going to Piss People Off - Kelly Jensen (via booksyarnink)

  13. Bad behavior in the library →

    jothelibrarian:

    I’ve been beavering away at work so not had much time to catch up with my RSS feeds from the real world (i.e. libraries which aren’t the one I work in!). Today’s favourite read was this gem titled“Theft, vandalism and hatred: 400 years of bad behaviour in the King James Library, part 1” from the University of St Andrews.

    A well used copy of John Mairs Brief survey of the terraqueous globe (Edinburgh, 1762).

    The blog post is such a great read! Go, now! And sign up to the RSS feed!