1. librarylinknj:

    This blog post, Sesame Visits Rikers Island, is really powerful. They’ve developed a bilingual toolkit for parents, caregivers, kids, teachers & librarians to use, Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration

    At a time when 1 in 28 children in America has an incarcerated parent, there are many things public libraries and library staff can do to help kids, parents and other caregivers. We talked about this a lot at the Public Library Think Tank hosted by School Library Journal in April. Nicholas Higgins is the Director of Community Outreach for NYPL and he spoke very movingly about the work that NYPL does at Rikers Island. You can read more about it here: Prison Libraries: Public Service Inside & Out.

    Unreservedly awesome.

  2. Lydia Willoughby, Words into Deeds | Library Journal Movers & Shakers

Willoughby’s real specialty, however, is bringing people together. While still a student in 2010, she began working with Literacy for Incarcerated Teens (LIT) and organized the sold-out, 500-ticket Biblioball: Spellbound fundraiser with the Desk Set, a New York City–based librarian group, which raised $10,000 for LIT.

    Lydia Willoughby, Words into Deeds | Library Journal Movers & Shakers

    Willoughby’s real specialty, however, is bringing people together. While still a student in 2010, she began working with Literacy for Incarcerated Teens (LIT) and organized the sold-out, 500-ticket Biblioball: Spellbound fundraiser with the Desk Set, a New York City–based librarian group, which raised $10,000 for LIT.

  3. 

Nearly 1.6 million people were in federal or state prisons in 2011, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. City and county jails are also full of people. Though there are increasingly vocal calls to reevaluate stiff sentencing for less serious crimes, this is unlikely to cause a dramatic decline in prisoners anytime soon. Meanwhile, each day, thousands return to their communities from some form of incarceration.
What is changing is a growing realization that more public, prison, and jail libraries can better identify and serve the often significant needs of inmates or those prisoners who are returning to their communities. Not only are some libraries providing books, they are providing innovative programs and services, helping inmates and returnees to learn about work and employment opportunities, the arts and to develop job-seeking skills.


Prison and Libraries: Public Service Inside and Out
I am so so excited about this feature in the February 1st issue of LJ. Read it! And then do something to help out the members of your community that are incarcerated.

    Nearly 1.6 million people were in federal or state prisons in 2011, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. City and county jails are also full of people. Though there are increasingly vocal calls to reevaluate stiff sentencing for less serious crimes, this is unlikely to cause a dramatic decline in prisoners anytime soon. Meanwhile, each day, thousands return to their communities from some form of incarceration.

    What is changing is a growing realization that more public, prison, and jail libraries can better identify and serve the often significant needs of inmates or those prisoners who are returning to their communities. Not only are some libraries providing books, they are providing innovative programs and services, helping inmates and returnees to learn about work and employment opportunities, the arts and to develop job-seeking skills.

    Prison and Libraries: Public Service Inside and Out

    I am so so excited about this feature in the February 1st issue of LJRead it! And then do something to help out the members of your community that are incarcerated.

  4. Has anyone ever worked as a prison librarian and is willing to talk... →

    thehighshelf:

    Has anyone ever worked as a prison librarian and is willing to talk about it?

    There is always at least one posting, but I’ve not done it nor do I know anyone who has and I wonder how useful I’d be or how much it’s even possible to be useful.

    ETA: I’m interested in how the libraries function for inmates, and how much the prison administration and structure allows the librarians to do the job. Particularly in Michigan.

    Also, if you’ve used Michigan libraries as an inmate, I am interested in your perspective as well.

    Signal boost!