1. bookpatrol:

    Library Infographics: 1930’s style

    Swooning.

  2. schoollibraryjournal:

SLJ has an aspiring illustrator in our office today!
Rebecca’s four-year-old daughter, Harper, created this “story” on her whiteboard.
How old do you have to be to win a Caldecott?

Harper is so cute.

    schoollibraryjournal:

    SLJ has an aspiring illustrator in our office today!

    Rebecca’s four-year-old daughter, Harper, created this “story” on her whiteboard.

    How old do you have to be to win a Caldecott?

    Harper is so cute.

  3. livefromthenypl:

Love in the library, anyone? Just try to stay away from the overdue fines. From Sophie Blackall’s Missed Connections: Love, Lost & Found, an illustrated compilation of the often evocative posts found in Craigslist’s “Missed Connections.” (via Brain Pickings)

There are few things in this world I love as much as a Missed Connection, or in the old Washington City Paper parlance, “I Saw You’s.” At least a couple of Sophie Blackall’s lovely illustrations are set in New York City libraries, so go out and see (or be seen)!

    livefromthenypl:

    Love in the library, anyone? Just try to stay away from the overdue fines. From Sophie Blackall’s Missed Connections: Love, Lost & Found, an illustrated compilation of the often evocative posts found in Craigslist’s “Missed Connections.” (via Brain Pickings)

    There are few things in this world I love as much as a Missed Connection, or in the old Washington City Paper parlance, “I Saw You’s.” At least a couple of Sophie Blackall’s lovely illustrations are set in New York City libraries, so go out and see (or be seen)!

  4. thelifeguardlibrarian:

Three new (gorgeous) children’s books out for Black History Month

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    Three new (gorgeous) children’s books out for Black History Month

  5. gouchersca:

    This is one of my personal favorite books in the SC&A here at Goucher. It is a 1937 edition of Edgar Alan Poe’s collected short stories; Tales of Mystery and Imagination. One of the things that makes this edition special are the beautiful, and haunting illustrations by Harry Clarke (1889-1931). Clarke is considered to be the leader in the Irish Arts and Crafts movement of the 20th century, while Poe (1809-1849) is widely considered to be one of the most prolific American authors of the 19th century. This particular edition of Tales of Mystery and Imagination is one of the most successful unions of text and image in a book, combining the grotesque with the erotic, in a profoundly ornate fashion.

  6. myimaginarybrooklyn:

“I wear the chains I forged in life.”

Jacob Marley’s gonna getcha! (Does that candle flame have a face?)

    myimaginarybrooklyn:

    “I wear the chains I forged in life.”

    Jacob Marley’s gonna getcha! (Does that candle flame have a face?)

  7. theartofgooglebooks:

    The author becomes a text: pasted-in portrait, clipped from a newspaper. 

    From the front matter of The Purgatory of Suicides: A Prison-Rhyme by Thomas Cooper (1850). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 6, 2006.

    Look at that face!

  8. libraryadvocates:

(and so much more)

    libraryadvocates:

    (and so much more)

  9. robcam-wfu:

Faulk the police. on Flickr.

    robcam-wfu:

    Faulk the police. on Flickr.

  10. GPOLJ! We have this poster framed and hanging in the Book Review section of the LJ offices.

    GPOLJ! We have this poster framed and hanging in the Book Review section of the LJ offices.

  11. (Source: devilduck)

  12. theparisreview:

Adorable, literal interpretations of author names by illustrator Mattias Adolfsson.

    theparisreview:

    Adorable, literal interpretations of author names by illustrator Mattias Adolfsson.

  13. nypl:

We are continuing Halloween-related Caturdays this October (see last week’s creepy kitty) with this photo of a flying feline on the back of a witch’s broomstick. This postcard from 1910 is in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection, and was originally sent to “Miss. A. Anderson” in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Happy Caturday!

Sorry, I just like witches, everyone.

    nypl:

    We are continuing Halloween-related Caturdays this October (see last week’s creepy kitty) with this photo of a flying feline on the back of a witch’s broomstick. This postcard from 1910 is in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection, and was originally sent to “Miss. A. Anderson” in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Happy Caturday!

    Sorry, I just like witches, everyone.

  14. Look, ma, no hands!

    Look, ma, no hands!

  15. livefromthenypl:

Joshua Landsman pays homage to the books and writers that have been important to him in a project entitled “Writers I Have Loved.” Landsman filled a sketchbook of drawings, depicting authors such as William Burroughs, Samuel Beckett, George Orwell, and other literary figures and works that made an impression on him—including the books that ultimately suffered defenestration. While Landsman’s sketches are particularly impressive, I think this would be a fun project for any literary junkie—a record of one’s “life as a reader”:

I’ve ended up with what I think is a pretty accurate record of my life as a reader, or at least a record of the highlights, the stuff that has stayed with me. It’s been very satisfying for me to revisit these books and writers. I really do love them—I feel like they’re friends of mine who have had a tremendous influence on who I am and how I think. I’ve tried to make the pages personal, too—to tell a little story about my relationship with the writer or book. But sometimes it’s just my thoughts about them.
- Joshua Landsman


This is really a lovely (and hyperliterate) tumblr.

    livefromthenypl:

    Joshua Landsman pays homage to the books and writers that have been important to him in a project entitled “Writers I Have Loved.” Landsman filled a sketchbook of drawings, depicting authors such as William Burroughs, Samuel Beckett, George Orwell, and other literary figures and works that made an impression on him—including the books that ultimately suffered defenestration. While Landsman’s sketches are particularly impressive, I think this would be a fun project for any literary junkie—a record of one’s “life as a reader”:

    I’ve ended up with what I think is a pretty accurate record of my life as a reader, or at least a record of the highlights, the stuff that has stayed with me. It’s been very satisfying for me to revisit these books and writers. I really do love them—I feel like they’re friends of mine who have had a tremendous influence on who I am and how I think. I’ve tried to make the pages personal, too—to tell a little story about my relationship with the writer or book. But sometimes it’s just my thoughts about them.

    - Joshua Landsman

    This is really a lovely (and hyperliterate) tumblr.