1. The Brooklyn Public Library is inviting all Brooklyn residents to participate in its Hurricane Sandy Oral History Project. News articles and statistics don’t equate to personal narratives recounting the emotional impact of the storm.

    Participants will be interviewed for 20-30 minutes and their stories will be preserved in a permanent collection and many will be available online.

    If you’re interested in being apart of the project, email June Koffi at j.koffi AT brooklynpubliclibrary.org.

    (Source: therumpus.net)

  2. LibraryLinkNJ: Timothy K. Quinn: Mover & Shaker →

    librarylinknj:

    image

    Princeton Public Library’s own Timothy K. Quinn has been honored as a Library Journal Mover & Shaker for his exemplary work leading the effort to serve Princeton by re-opening PPL in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. For two days, the Library was the only public facility open in the town.

    <3

  3. infoneer-pulse:

After Storm Destruction, Rockaway Libraries Help Keep Community Afloat
It was the little things, the sudden absence of everyday fixtures, that disoriented residents in the Rockaways in the days after the storm, as much as the loss of house and home. The traffic lights had gone dark. Where was one to get a prescription filled? And oh, what about books due at the library?
The Rockaways still look like ghost towns. But the community libraries are there — if only in the form of a bus, parked in front of the gutted, muddy Peninsula branch. Days after the storm laid waste to four Queens Borough Public Library branches in the Rockaways, a colorful mobile library bus has hummed just outside its former location on Rockaway Beach Boulevard, offering warmth, power outlets, emergency information and books.
» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

    infoneer-pulse:

    After Storm Destruction, Rockaway Libraries Help Keep Community Afloat

    It was the little things, the sudden absence of everyday fixtures, that disoriented residents in the Rockaways in the days after the storm, as much as the loss of house and home. The traffic lights had gone dark. Where was one to get a prescription filled? And oh, what about books due at the library?

    The Rockaways still look like ghost towns. But the community libraries are there — if only in the form of a bus, parked in front of the gutted, muddy Peninsula branch. Days after the storm laid waste to four Queens Borough Public Library branches in the Rockaways, a colorful mobile library bus has hummed just outside its former location on Rockaway Beach Boulevard, offering warmth, power outlets, emergency information and books.

    » via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

  4. Hurricane Sandy’s Austerity Lessons →

    willywaldo:

    “While surely unintentional, this natural disaster has afforded those affected by it a small taste of how countless others around the rest of the world live – and many not just during a crisis, but on a regular basis.”

    My friend Lucine wrote a powerful essay on the importance of “altruism, charity, and solidarity in the face of adversity to guide and inspire us if and when disaster comes along.” A Thanksgiving must-read.

  5. What can a library do when people are cold, tired, hungry, and scared? The library brings them all the things it always does. It provides information, such as FEMA applications, where aid centers are set up, locations for Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders. It provides comfort: charge your cell phone, send an email, or just get out of the cold for a few minutes. It provides entertainment: books were lent whether people had a library card or not.

    These are all the direct benefits, but there are many intangibles as well. Everyone knew that, even at their lowest point, the library was still there for them.

    — 

    Christian Zabriskie, of Urban Libraries Unite and a staff member of Queens Library, on helping the community after superstorm Sandy (via queenslibrary)

    Help ULU!!!

    (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

  6. I’m not overly emotional about the loss of books (even in the times of budget cuts, books are just small things that can be replaced), but damage to actual library buildings is really upsetting. When people lose their houses, electricity, cellphone and internet service, heat and other things that are necessary for their basic comfort, livelihood and communication, the library can serve as a lifeline. When that lifeline is gone, it can be hard to know where to turn.

    — Ingrid Henny Abrams, a children’s librarian who volunteered to help Queens Library at Howard Beach, affected by Sandy, reopen. (via queenslibrary)

  7. QUE(E)RY: Update on Hurricane Sandy →

    queeryparty:

    In response to Hurricane Sandy, the Que(e)ry Librarians are designating additional proceeds from our upcoming event to benefit the Ali Forney Center. Their center in Chelsea was destroyed by flooding at a time when the services they provide to homeless LGBT youth are all the more crucial. Emergency funds will help AFC restore services and facilities to those affected by the hurricane and the winter storm which came shortly thereafter.

    The first 100 donors at our party on November 24th will get a free beer courtesy of Public Assembly. You can also donate now on AFC’s website.

    Here are a few other library-related resources if you are looking for help or looking for ways to get involved:

    NYC Distribution Locations

    Our friends at Urban Librarians Unite have compiled a list of resources for Hurricane Sandy relief, and are also conducting a Children’s book drive.

    Brooklyn Public Library’s Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Queens Public Library’s Response to Hurricane Sandy

    NYPL’s response to Hurricane Sandy

  8. darienlibrary:

    Here are just a couple photos from our Darien Community Hurricane Potluck. It was a delicious success. Check out the rest of the photos on our flickr stream.