1. thelifeguardlibrarian:

Happy 165th birthday, Bram Stoker!

Lovely Google Doodle today!

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    Happy 165th birthday, Bram Stoker!

    Lovely Google Doodle today!

  2. Google (as well as the rest of us) celebrates Moby-Dick; or, the Whale's 161st birthday today. I should probably quote from the bit by the book's sub-sub librarian (and almost surely will later), but today my mind keeps going back to the Pequod's cabin boy, Pip, who is left behind, afloat in the vast ocean, during a frenzied chase after a whale. Though he is picked up afterwards, the experience has forever altered him.

Pip’s ringed horizon began to expand around him miserably.…The sea had jeeringly kept his finite body up, but drowned the infinite of his soul. Not drowned entirely, though. Rather carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs. He saw God’s foot upon the treadle of the loom, and spoke it; and therefore his shipmates called him mad. So man’s insanity is heaven’s sense; and wandering from all mortal reason, man comes at last to that celestial thought, which, to reason, is absurd and frantic; and weal or woe, feels then uncompromised, indifferent as his God.

    Google (as well as the rest of us) celebrates Moby-Dick; or, the Whale's 161st birthday today. I should probably quote from the bit by the book's sub-sub librarian (and almost surely will later), but today my mind keeps going back to the Pequod's cabin boy, Pip, who is left behind, afloat in the vast ocean, during a frenzied chase after a whale. Though he is picked up afterwards, the experience has forever altered him.

    Pip’s ringed horizon began to expand around him miserably.…The sea had jeeringly kept his finite body up, but drowned the infinite of his soul. Not drowned entirely, though. Rather carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs. He saw God’s foot upon the treadle of the loom, and spoke it; and therefore his shipmates called him mad. So man’s insanity is heaven’s sense; and wandering from all mortal reason, man comes at last to that celestial thought, which, to reason, is absurd and frantic; and weal or woe, feels then uncompromised, indifferent as his God.