1. A World of Firsts | Genre Spotlight: New Adult →

    What does this mean for librarians? There is still difficulty in finding and purchasing the books for a collection, a challenge that will ease as the category becomes more mainstream. Also, the debate of where to place the books once they’re purchased is just a variation on an old theme: we’ve discussed for years whether it’s better to break out the genre fiction or keep it all in the fiction section so that authors who write in several different genres can have all of their works found. There are arguments to be made on both sides, and no one has ever come up with a definitive solution. The same may happen with NA. Some libraries may choose to give the books their own section, others to interfile. In ebooks, at least, librarians won’t have to choose but can place the same titles in multiple categories.

    What’s key is helping readers to find the books. As librarians are starting to become more aware of NA publishing, readers are, too. If we want those readers coming to us, then we must be prepared in the old-fashioned, readers’ advisory (RA) way. While we struggle with how to label and categorize the books, readers will be asking for suggestions. Though there is a homogeneity to a lot of NA, with its contemporary settings and strong romantic elements, there is still enough variety that RA librarians will want to brush up on a few of the core authors better to direct readers.

    An excellent overview of the burgeoning New Adult genre with a reading list  of some fan favorites and upcoming releases.

  2. Oldies but Goodies: Genre Backlists for Cool Summer Reads →

    Summer is a-coming in, and the holds for the big new books are growing. While your patrons wait for the new Daniel Silva or Chelsea Cain or Diana Gabaldon, why not suggest some of these backlist titles. 

  3. New Adult Fiction | PLA 2014 →

    New Adult (NA) fiction is the rage these days in the publishing world, but what is it exactly? Is it an new adult fiction copy 300x93 New Adult Fiction | PLA 2014 actual genre or just a marketing term? At a lively PLA 2014 ConverStation session entitled “New Adult Fiction: What is It, Where is It, and What Should We Do with It?” facilitators Sophie Brookover (LibraryLinkNJ—The Library Cooperative, Piscataway, NJ) and Kelly Jensen (Beloit (WI) Public Library)  threw out five questions for the audience to discuss at their tables and then share in the main conversation. How do you define New Adult? Do you think New Adult matters as a category? Do you have patrons asking specifically for this category? How do you explain to colleagues who the NA reader may be? Should NA fiction be shelved in a special place?

    Tumblarians, join the conversation. Do you get requests for New Adult fiction as it’s currently defined?

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  4. I knew this was bound to happen. First Amish fiction (aka bonnet fiction) came on the scene. Then came the genre fiction mashup. And now kitties have been added to the mix.

  5. For LJ's forthcoming  August Genre Spotlight feature on Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, we're running a brief survey on the popularity of these genres in libraries. Fill it out before June 7! (And thank you!)

    For LJ's forthcoming  August Genre Spotlight feature on Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, we're running a brief survey on the popularity of these genres in libraries. Fill it out before June 7! (And thank you!)

  6. Psst! Have you checked out our Best Genre Fiction picks yet? You should.
YA Lit for Adults
Thrillers
Mysteries
Romance
Christian Fiction
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Graphic Novels
Street Lit
Historical Fiction

    Psst! Have you checked out our Best Genre Fiction picks yet? You should.

  7. Random House Launches New Digital-Only Imprints →

    cloudunbound:

    This is great news for Cloud librarians because it means you are going to have more genre fiction and young adult works to add to your collections. Here’s the breakdown of the imprints:

    Alibi, a mystery-thriller line; Flirt, a YA/New Adult list; and Hydra, a new digital-only science fiction line; in addition to expanding the reach of the Loveswept digital romance imprint.

    Oh, and:

    In addition the Loveswept imprint, relaunched as a digital-only line in 2011, will expand its list to include works in popular mystery/thriller, new adult and science-fiction/fantasy genres. First titles will be released in early 2013 and will feature original works.