1. Four Librarians, Four E-readers, Two Years →

    Reflecting on our collective experiences, we now understand that our dedicated e-readers served both as bridge technology and transitional technology. Two years ago, dedicated e-readers introduced us to the convenience of reading on mobile devices. For three of us, this bridge to e-reading allowed us to reconnect with what we thought was a long-lost pleasure. None of us abandoned print books, but e-readers increased the reading options available to us and for that we are grateful.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  2. The contemporary library is about more than just digitizing documents and lending e-books to patrons on their Kindles and iPads.

    — 

    WNYC (via queenslibrary)

    Well yes.

  3. The great beauty of e-books means that all this stuff is suddenly trackable—how much time people spend reading, how people engage with their books. Which means, finally, there might be a way to measure consumer tastes and habits like there is in most of the rest of the world of entertainment—and the publishing industry has a lot more information available to help them create more books that people want to read. On the down side, are books better, really, just because writers and publishers know more about what readers like? All good fodder for debate, but mostly, I’m glad e-books have helped us determine the perfect romantic hero: he “has a European accent and is in his 30s with black hair and green eyes.”

    — What Does Your E-Reader Know About You?; The Book That Disappears - Entertainment - The Atlantic Wire (via infoneer-pulse)

  4. 
jerumebrunneng:
An image of a page from The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, describing The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, on an e-reader that resembles The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy.

This is the future, guys.

    jerumebrunneng:

    An image of a page from The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, describing The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, on an e-reader that resembles The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy.

    This is the future, guys.

  5. (Source: mongolom)

  6. 
thekindlemonologues:
calimae:
Popular e-Book Formats & Readers

Kindles also read .TXT and .Doc formats. Perhaps not super popular, but worth knowing.
And if you’re prepared to “tinker” with the Firmware? They’ll also read epubs. Granted not DRM protected epubs, but regular DRM free epubs? They work a charm.
[I’d also argue that the Kobo ecosystem being missing is strange, as I’m sure their marketshare is higher than that of Windows 7 / Phone.]

A useful infograph!

    thekindlemonologues:

    calimae:

    Popular e-Book Formats & Readers

    Kindles also read .TXT and .Doc formats. Perhaps not super popular, but worth knowing.

    And if you’re prepared to “tinker” with the Firmware? They’ll also read epubs. Granted not DRM protected epubs, but regular DRM free epubs? They work a charm.

    [I’d also argue that the Kobo ecosystem being missing is strange, as I’m sure their marketshare is higher than that of Windows 7 / Phone.]

    A useful infograph!

    (Source: twitter.com)

  7. "Libraries would love to be able to provide you with content."

    librariesandlemonade:

    Incredibly frustrated at people who blame libraries for not having readily available and accessible content for their e-readers.

    It’s not the libraries standing in the way, kids. Generally, the libraries would love to be able to provide you with content. It’s the publishers.

  8. You don’t have to be a print book person or an e-book person. It’s not an either/or proposition. You can choose to have your text delivered on paper with a pretty cover, or you can choose to have it delivered over the air to your sleek little device. You can even play it way loose and read in both formats! Crazy, right? To have choice. Neither is better or worse — for you, for the economy, for the sake of “responsible self-government.” We should worry less about how people get their books and — say it with me now! — just be glad that people are reading.

    — Jonathan Segura, “No More E-Books Vs. Print Books Arguments, OK?” via NPR  (via thelibrarianontherun)

  9. Study: As E-Readers Increase, So Does Resistance →

    infoneer-pulse:

    E-reader usage is growing beyond a group of early adopters, but new stats suggest that consumers are also increasingly resistant to buying an e-reader.

    A study presented by book marketing firm Verso Advertising at Digital Book World last week finds that 15.8 percent of book buyers already own an e-reader—that figure has doubled since 2010. But 51.8 percent of book buyers say they are “not at all likely” to purchase one in the next 12 months. That is up from 40 percent in 2009.

    Among “avid” book buyers—those who purchase 10 or more books per year—e-reader penetration is more pronounced: 22.3 percent of avid book buyers already own an e-reader, and 10.1 percent say they’re “very likely” to buy one in the next 12 months. But 49.7 percent of avid book buyers say they are not at all likely to purchase one.

    » via paidContent

  10. The ebooks being borrowed by Amazon customers aren’t the same ePUB files being licensed to libraries via Overdrive, they’re Amazon’s files that they’re allowing their customers to access via a marketing partnership with local libraries.

    Basically, Amazon one-upped Barnes & Noble’s Read In-Store feature that allows Nook customers to “read NOOK Books FREE for up to one hour per day” in any of their 700+ stores, and put the exact same feature in every Kindle customer’s living room via 11,000+ public libraries, without the physical and timing limitations. Notably, it seems they’ve also side-stepped Overdrive’s new WIN (Want It Now) Catalog that allows library patrons to purchase books (and audiobooks) directly, via links to retailers.

    As “licensing” increasingly becomes the norm for various forms of media, knowingly or not, libraries are finding themselves on the front lines of a battle that most consumers arguably don’t even realize is being fought: the question of ownership in the digital age.

    — LJ’s Guy Gonzalez, from his blog, Loud Poet

  11. calimae:

“E-reader users are more likely to both read and purchase more books than non-readers…”
It strikes me that there could be a few reasons for the higher incidence of purchases (does downloading a free ebook count as a ‘purchase’, I wonder…):
easier to buy ebooks than print (quicker delivery, etc.)
obtaining the ebook via the library may not be an option (either they don’t know it’s available, they don’t want to wait in line, or they are frustrated by all of the steps required to use a library ebook)
don’t have to worry about storage

    calimae:

    “E-reader users are more likely to both read and purchase more books than non-readers…”

    It strikes me that there could be a few reasons for the higher incidence of purchases (does downloading a free ebook count as a ‘purchase’, I wonder…):

    • easier to buy ebooks than print (quicker delivery, etc.)
    • obtaining the ebook via the library may not be an option (either they don’t know it’s available, they don’t want to wait in line, or they are frustrated by all of the steps required to use a library ebook)
    • don’t have to worry about storage

    (Source: lonewolflibrarian.wordpress.com)

  12. LJ SLJ Ebook Summit # tag = #ebksmt See you at 10 AM ET tomorrow!

  13. Steve Jobs Dead: Apple Co-Founder Dies At 56

  14. Only 6 more days until the LJ Ebook Summit. Will you be there?

    Library Journal and School Library Journal present our second virtual summit on ebooks and their role in the future of libraries. Ebooks: The New Normal will bring together librarians, vendors and publishers, and industry experts and offers keynote presentations as well as three tracks designed for public, academic, and K-12 libraries to discuss how libraries are leveraging the ebook opportunity to improve service and reach more users than ever before.