1. …And so this post will serve to say that we’re okay with all of it, really! The Library would just be a big empty building without you! We’re glad you are here.

    — 

    No Need to Apologize to Your Librarian | Eleventh Stack

    Some things you don’t need to apologize for are:

    • I don’t have time to read
    • I don’t like to read
    • I haven’t been to the library in a long time
    • I’m sorry to bother you…*
    • I have fines.
    • I can’t find…

    *Especially this one.  Do not feel sorry for talking to a library staff member!  You are the reason we are here!  We are glad to hear from you!

    (via text-block)

    In fact, let’s nix needless apologies altogether (and yes, I’m speaking to women in particular). “Excuse me” can adequately replace 98% of the apologies you might make in a day. You’re perfectly entitled to use the coffee maker, exit an elevator, approach a colleague, or round a corner without saying “I’m sorry” to anybody. Trust me.

    (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

  2. glecharles:

Book publishers love their full-size image emails, despite every source of best practices advising against it. This latest example was sent via MailChimp, which explicitly says don’t do it in their own Email Marketing Field Guide:
Sending nothing but a big, gigantic graphic as the HTML email. Sigh, that’s what spammers do. And since most email programs block images by default, what do you think your recipients see when (if) they open your email? Many spam filters will block your email if you don’t have a healthy balance of images and text.
I purposefully block images by default on all marketing emails so I can use them as examples whenever we get pushback, often to no avail.
“We’ve always sent them like this.”
#emailfail #cmonson

A day in the life of an LJ inbox.

    glecharles:

    Book publishers love their full-size image emails, despite every source of best practices advising against it. This latest example was sent via MailChimp, which explicitly says don’t do it in their own Email Marketing Field Guide:

    Sending nothing but a big, gigantic graphic as the HTML email. Sigh, that’s what spammers do. And since most email programs block images by default, what do you think your recipients see when (if) they open your email? Many spam filters will block your email if you don’t have a healthy balance of images and text.

    I purposefully block images by default on all marketing emails so I can use them as examples whenever we get pushback, often to no avail.

    “We’ve always sent them like this.”

    #emailfail #cmonson

    A day in the life of an LJ inbox.

  3. This is my first review by a prostitute—and a first book review for this prostitute (to my knowledge). I have no quarrel with prostitutes, as long as they know how to read. But “Nightmare Brunette,” as she calls herself, apparently didn’t read SWOON.

    — 

    Besty Prioleau responds to a recent Bookforum review of her book Swoon: Great Seducers and Why Women Love Them in Bookforum’s comment section, aka enacts my own person nightmares. As described in this MobyLives article:

    Some context is helpful here: Shane is a sex worker in addition to being a damned good writer. She’s been blogging for years, and has recently begun to publish reviews and essays about sex work and other topics in places like The New Inquiry

    Which is to say:

    A Comprehensive Glossary Of Gifs / gifs glossary

    You wrote a book; now step away from the keyboard » MobyLives