1. thepenguinpress:

These titles were recently nominated for outstanding science writing, but they also make for a spooky read! 

    thepenguinpress:

    These titles were recently nominated for outstanding science writing, but they also make for a spooky read! 

  2. medievalpoc:

    Hiya,
    I’ve started a new tumblr to share free/open nonfiction ebooks made available by the publisher.
    Lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
    The first few titles include
    as well as some titles that deal with 20th history
    I’d be grateful if you could let your readers know
    Cheers
    This is an absolute GEM of a tumblr! Thank you so much for letting me know and sharing these FREE BOOKS with everyone!! I have added links in above.

    Interesting new Tumblr to follow.

  3. /
What’s New from Our Neighbors | Collection Development: Latin American Fiction

Literature in Latin America  since the boom of the 1960s and 1970s has not shown a slackening in production of quality works or a diversity of themes. The awarding of the Nobel Prize for Literature to the poet Octavio Paz in 1990 and the novelists Gabriel García Márquez (1982) and Mario Vargas Llosa (2010) has increased awareness of the literary richness of the region and validated the legitimacy of its contribution to the world literary scene. Nonetheless, most of the members of the current generation of Latin American writers are not yet household names in this country. Publication and translation output are still dominated by the traditional big players—Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Lusophone Brazil—but other voices, especially from Central America, have begun to emerge. These 29 titles will add falvor to all collections.

    /

    What’s New from Our Neighbors | Collection Development: Latin American Fiction

    Literature in Latin America since the boom of the 1960s and 1970s has not shown a slackening in production of quality works or a diversity of themes. The awarding of the Nobel Prize for Literature to the poet Octavio Paz in 1990 and the novelists Gabriel García Márquez (1982) and Mario Vargas Llosa (2010) has increased awareness of the literary richness of the region and validated the legitimacy of its contribution to the world literary scene. Nonetheless, most of the members of the current generation of Latin American writers are not yet household names in this country. Publication and translation output are still dominated by the traditional big players—Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Lusophone Brazil—but other voices, especially from Central America, have begun to emerge. These 29 titles will add falvor to all collections.

    (Source: reviews.libraryjournal.com)

  4. melvillehouse:

harperperennial:

delgrosso:

Gorgeous new Olive Editions from harperperennial.

I call these the hot ones.

"We go together like olives and fire"

    melvillehouse:

    harperperennial:

    delgrosso:

    Gorgeous new Olive Editions from harperperennial.

    I call these the hot ones.

    "We go together like olives and fire"

  5. patrondebris:

    More #weeding and #collectiondevelopment in the 790s. Now struggling with a strong urge to eat a banana underwater.

  6. A World of Firsts | Genre Spotlight: New Adult →

    What does this mean for librarians? There is still difficulty in finding and purchasing the books for a collection, a challenge that will ease as the category becomes more mainstream. Also, the debate of where to place the books once they’re purchased is just a variation on an old theme: we’ve discussed for years whether it’s better to break out the genre fiction or keep it all in the fiction section so that authors who write in several different genres can have all of their works found. There are arguments to be made on both sides, and no one has ever come up with a definitive solution. The same may happen with NA. Some libraries may choose to give the books their own section, others to interfile. In ebooks, at least, librarians won’t have to choose but can place the same titles in multiple categories.

    What’s key is helping readers to find the books. As librarians are starting to become more aware of NA publishing, readers are, too. If we want those readers coming to us, then we must be prepared in the old-fashioned, readers’ advisory (RA) way. While we struggle with how to label and categorize the books, readers will be asking for suggestions. Though there is a homogeneity to a lot of NA, with its contemporary settings and strong romantic elements, there is still enough variety that RA librarians will want to brush up on a few of the core authors better to direct readers.

    An excellent overview of the burgeoning New Adult genre with a reading list  of some fan favorites and upcoming releases.

  7. sdiaz101:

Great titles here for every reader, Latino or Not. (via (3) Children’s Books for Hispanic Heritage Month)

 Viva! (With thanks to a Chilean Tumblr friend who corrected my fractured Spanish.)

    sdiaz101:

    Great titles here for every reader, Latino or Not. (via (3) Children’s Books for Hispanic Heritage Month)

    Viva! (With thanks to a Chilean Tumblr friend who corrected my fractured Spanish.)

  8. 
Rumor and reflection
Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells: The Best of Early Vanity Fair (Penguin, Oct.) celebrates the 100th anniversary of the publication by highlighting its notable works from the 1910s to the 1930s. The most captivating aspect of this collection is that it features works written by several authors before they reached their peak. Included are sonnets by Edna St. Vincent Millay three years before she won a Pulitzer, a screenplay by F. Scott Fitzgerald five years before the release of The Great Gatsby, and an article by A.A. Milne—four years before Winnie-the-Pooh—detailing his life as a struggling writer. Also on hand are founding members of the Algonquin Round Table such as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, and Robert E. Sherwood, of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame fame. Most amusing is e.e. cumming’s “When Calvin Coolidge Laughed,” a satirical account of the pandemonium—complete with falling skyscrapers and raging fires—that ensued after this fake event happened. Historians will appreciate writers’ serious reflections on World War I, Prohibition, and the stock market crash of 1929, as well as Janet Flanner’s biographical article on executioners’ families in Paris.
The doings of the Byron family were drawing room fodder in Victorian England thanks to Lord Byron’s affairs with members of both sexes. The debt-ridden poet strategically married wealthy Annabella Milbanke, but his carelessness led her to escape to the countryside with newborn Ada. Meanwhile, Byron eluded his creditors by journeying to France, never to return. The gossipy biography Ada’s Algorithm: How Lord Byron’s Daughter Ada Lovelace Launched the Digital Age (Melville House, Oct.) details how Byron’s only legitimate daughter studied mathematics as a child, an attempt by Annabella to counter the indiscipline she loathed in her estranged husband. Ada’s interest in the subject grew after meeting Charles ­Babbage, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Their frequent meetings led her to translate a paper on his analytical engine (the first mechanical computer) for Scientific Memoirs, adding meaningful explanations on the machine’s algebraic operations, yet the scientific community ignored her because of her gender. (Ada posthumously had a programming language named after her.)
Coming in November is Kate Williams’s Ambition and Desire: The Dangerous Life of Josephine Bonaparte (Ballantine; Prepub Alert, 6/12/14). Born into a once-prosperous plantation family in Martinique, Joséphine was sent to France as a teenager to marry a family friend. (Her father’s philandering and gambling repelled potential suitors at home.) This is the story of how the unhappy marriage between Joséphine and her licentious husband, Alexandre—who barely acknowledged his legitimate children and relegated his wife to a convent—created the formidable persona she is known for today. Alexandre was executed during the French Revolution and his then-imprisoned wife was only spared owing to the downfall of Maximilien de Robespierre. Suddenly destitute, she subsisted by servicing—selling herself to notables, including an army commander and benefactor of young solider Napoleon Bonaparte. Williams provides an informal yet intimate look at the troubled relationship between Napoleon and the older woman who would become his wife and de facto political advisor. Napoleon’s family never warmed to the calculating widow who was unable to produce an heir, causing Napoleon to discard her for Marie-Louise of Austria. A scandalous and satisfying story for those who enjoy the seamier side of history.—Stephanie Sendaula

in the mood for some juicy nonfiction this fall?  LJ Reviews Editor Stephanie Sendaula recommends three intriguing titles.

    Rumor and reflection

    Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells: The Best of Early Vanity Fair (Penguin, Oct.) celebrates the 100th anniversary of the publication by highlighting its notable works from the 1910s to the 1930s. The most captivating aspect of this collection is that it features works written by several authors before they reached their peak. Included are sonnets by Edna St. Vincent Millay three years before she won a Pulitzer, a screenplay by F. Scott Fitzgerald five years before the release of The Great Gatsby, and an article by A.A. Milne—four years before Winnie-the-Pooh—detailing his life as a struggling writer. Also on hand are founding members of the Algonquin Round Table such as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, and Robert E. Sherwood, of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame fame. Most amusing is e.e. cumming’s “When Calvin Coolidge Laughed,” a satirical account of the pandemonium—complete with falling skyscrapers and raging fires—that ensued after this fake event happened. Historians will appreciate writers’ serious reflections on World War I, Prohibition, and the stock market crash of 1929, as well as Janet Flanner’s biographical article on executioners’ families in Paris.

    The doings of the Byron family were drawing room fodder in Victorian England thanks to Lord Byron’s affairs with members of both sexes. The debt-ridden poet strategically married wealthy Annabella Milbanke, but his carelessness led her to escape to the countryside with newborn Ada. Meanwhile, Byron eluded his creditors by journeying to France, never to return. The gossipy biography Ada’s Algorithm: How Lord Byron’s Daughter Ada Lovelace Launched the Digital Age (Melville House, Oct.) details how Byron’s only legitimate daughter studied mathematics as a child, an attempt by Annabella to counter the indiscipline she loathed in her estranged husband. Ada’s interest in the subject grew after meeting Charles ­Babbage, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Their frequent meetings led her to translate a paper on his analytical engine (the first mechanical computer) for Scientific Memoirs, adding meaningful explanations on the machine’s algebraic operations, yet the scientific community ignored her because of her gender. (Ada posthumously had a programming language named after her.)

    Coming in November is Kate Williams’s Ambition and Desire: The Dangerous Life of Josephine Bonaparte (Ballantine; Prepub Alert, 6/12/14). Born into a once-prosperous plantation family in Martinique, Joséphine was sent to France as a teenager to marry a family friend. (Her father’s philandering and gambling repelled potential suitors at home.) This is the story of how the unhappy marriage between Joséphine and her licentious husband, Alexandre—who barely acknowledged his legitimate children and relegated his wife to a convent—created the formidable persona she is known for today. Alexandre was executed during the French Revolution and his then-imprisoned wife was only spared owing to the downfall of Maximilien de Robespierre. Suddenly destitute, she subsisted by servicing—selling herself to notables, including an army commander and benefactor of young solider Napoleon Bonaparte. Williams provides an informal yet intimate look at the troubled relationship between Napoleon and the older woman who would become his wife and de facto political advisor. Napoleon’s family never warmed to the calculating widow who was unable to produce an heir, causing Napoleon to discard her for Marie-Louise of Austria. A scandalous and satisfying story for those who enjoy the seamier side of history.—Stephanie Sendaula

    in the mood for some juicy nonfiction this fall?  LJ Reviews Editor Stephanie Sendaula recommends three intriguing titles.

  9. 
As I prepped to write this, I realized that many of the upcoming titles I’m excited about involve communication—be it interviews or letters or examinations of how we interact—and crafts. Here are some I find particularly interesting.
“I had to put down By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review (Holt, Oct.),” edited by Pamela Paul, “to do real work,” I wrote to one of LJ’s literature reviewers. She helpfully agreed to review the book. The astute unabridged interviews feature a wide range of nonfiction and fiction writers such as Dan Savage, Neil Gaiman, and J.K. Rowling.
Another upcoming interview collection worth noting is Daniel Rachel’s The Art of Noise: Conversations with Great Songwriters (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Oct.). Originally published in the UK, it’s a thick volume that boasts new and in-depth interviews with 27 British songwriters whose popularity spans decades—everyone from Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe (Pet Shop Boys) to Noel Gallagher (Oasis) and Lily Allen talk about their craft. Read it cover to cover or skip around to your favorite artists.
As for books on how we interact, one that seems to blend social science with pop culture and memoir is Nev Schulman’s In Real Life: Love, Lies & Identity in the Digital Age (Grand Central, Sept.; Prepub Alert, 3/17/14). Schulman hosts MTV’s Catfish: The TV Show, which investigates whether people are in online relationships with someone legitimate or a “catfish,” defined by Merriam-Webster as “a person who sets up a false personal profile on a social networking site for fraudulent or deceptive purposes.” Here he provides insights into the show and people’s motivations for catfishing.
I’m also starting to think about fall crafting projects. One book on my radar is Vintage Knit: 25 Knitting & Crochet Patterns Refashioned for Today (Laurence King, Sept.) by Marine Malak with Geraldine Warner. It’s well organized and offers large photos, including one of the original piece that inspired each pattern; also helpful is that instructions for color-work are both written out and charted. I can’t wait to try out the Two-Colour Spot Jersey. But, should this go awry, as I unravel my project and cast-on again I’ll keep close at hand a copy of Heather Mann’s CraftFail: When Homemade Goes Horribly Wrong (Workman, Oct.). Based on the blog of the same name, it makes light of disastrous crafting escapades. “They come out squashed and torn and look like something one might use to scrub feet,” laments the caption of a tissue paper flower. Try, try again.—Amanda Mastrull

Hard to believe summer is almost over. As consolation, the fall publishing promises a cornucopia of great titles as selected by LJ’s ever-discerning book review editors. 

    As I prepped to write this, I realized that many of the upcoming titles I’m excited about involve communication—be it interviews or letters or examinations of how we interact—and crafts. Here are some I find particularly interesting.

    “I had to put down By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review (Holt, Oct.),” edited by Pamela Paul, “to do real work,” I wrote to one of LJ’s literature reviewers. She helpfully agreed to review the book. The astute unabridged interviews feature a wide range of nonfiction and fiction writers such as Dan Savage, Neil Gaiman, and J.K. Rowling.

    Another upcoming interview collection worth noting is Daniel Rachel’s The Art of Noise: Conversations with Great Songwriters (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Oct.). Originally published in the UK, it’s a thick volume that boasts new and in-depth interviews with 27 British songwriters whose popularity spans decades—everyone from Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe (Pet Shop Boys) to Noel Gallagher (Oasis) and Lily Allen talk about their craft. Read it cover to cover or skip around to your favorite artists.

    As for books on how we interact, one that seems to blend social science with pop culture and memoir is Nev Schulman’s In Real Life: Love, Lies & Identity in the Digital Age (Grand Central, Sept.; Prepub Alert, 3/17/14). Schulman hosts MTV’s Catfish: The TV Show, which investigates whether people are in online relationships with someone legitimate or a “catfish,” defined by Merriam-Webster as “a person who sets up a false personal profile on a social networking site for fraudulent or deceptive purposes.” Here he provides insights into the show and people’s motivations for catfishing.

    I’m also starting to think about fall crafting projects. One book on my radar is Vintage Knit: 25 Knitting & Crochet Patterns Refashioned for Today (Laurence King, Sept.) by Marine Malak with Geraldine Warner. It’s well organized and offers large photos, including one of the original piece that inspired each pattern; also helpful is that instructions for color-work are both written out and charted. I can’t wait to try out the Two-Colour Spot Jersey. But, should this go awry, as I unravel my project and cast-on again I’ll keep close at hand a copy of Heather Mann’s CraftFail: When Homemade Goes Horribly Wrong (Workman, Oct.). Based on the blog of the same name, it makes light of disastrous crafting escapades. “They come out squashed and torn and look like something one might use to scrub feet,” laments the caption of a tissue paper flower. Try, try again.—Amanda Mastrull

    Hard to believe summer is almost over. As consolation, the fall publishing promises a cornucopia of great titles as selected by LJ’s ever-discerning book review editors. 

    (Source: reviews.libraryjournal.com)

  10. Nine New Adult Reads To Keep You Up All Night →

    This growing genre will be explored in further detail  in a September 15 feature article in LJ.

  11. oupacademic:

Congratulations to American historian and Oxford author David Brion Davis, a recipient of the 2013 National Humanities Medal. Renowned for his scholarship on American slavery, Dr. Davis’s most recent book with Oxford University Press is Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.
The National Endowment for the Humanities, which awards the annual prize, praised Dr. Davis “for reshaping our understanding of history… [His] examinations of slavery and abolitionism drive us to keep making moral progress in our time.”

    oupacademic:

    Congratulations to American historian and Oxford author David Brion Davis, a recipient of the 2013 National Humanities Medal. Renowned for his scholarship on American slavery, Dr. Davis’s most recent book with Oxford University Press is Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

    The National Endowment for the Humanities, which awards the annual prize, praised Dr. Davis “for reshaping our understanding of history… [His] examinations of slavery and abolitionism drive us to keep making moral progress in our time.”

  12. Summer Best Debuts | First Novels →

  13. rhlibrary:

rhlibrary:

Penguin Stacks English is a new resource for your patrons who wish to enhance their fluency by reading full-length books!!
Our publishing colleagues have selected titles especially for nonnative readers, who can browse our site to find just the right books for their interests and skill levels. Browse categories like Classics, Business, New York Times Bestsellers, Hot New Releases, Young Adult, Books in Film, Bilingual … there are stacks full of books for everyone’s interest.
To learn more, visit the site or email Penguin!

Visit Penguin Random House at ALA to learn more!

    rhlibrary:

    rhlibrary:

    Penguin Stacks English is a new resource for your patrons who wish to enhance their fluency by reading full-length books!!

    Our publishing colleagues have selected titles especially for nonnative readers, who can browse our site to find just the right books for their interests and skill levels. Browse categories like Classics, Business, New York Times Bestsellers, Hot New Releases, Young Adult, Books in Film, Bilingual … there are stacks full of books for everyone’s interest.

    To learn more, visit the site or email Penguin!

    Visit Penguin Random House at ALA to learn more!

  14. TED Joins with Simon & Schuster for a 12-Book Series →

    If you can’t get to a TED talk, read the book.

  15. hmhbooks:

It’s here! Tolkien’s translation of BEOWULF, a project nearly a century in the making, is finally in the world today:

The translation of BEOWULF by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. 

Buy it here (or get some fresh air and head to your local bookstore in person!):AMAZONBARNES & NOBLEINDIEBOUNDE-BOOK

    hmhbooks:

    It’s here! Tolkien’s translation of BEOWULF, a project nearly a century in the making, is finally in the world today:

    The translation of BEOWULF by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. 

    Buy it here (or get some fresh air and head to your local bookstore in person!):
    AMAZON
    BARNES & NOBLE
    INDIEBOUND
    E-BOOK