1. Library Care Packages: CDs, Freshly Picked | Music Matters →

    A lot of things justify maintaining and promoting physical music collections. One of my favorites is a service we’ve developed at the Cincinnati public library. The CD of the Month Club builds on the premise of music discovery services such as Pandora and was, in no small part, inspired by LJ 2012 Movers & Shakers Matthew Moyer and Andrew Coulon’s stellar Personalized Playlists program at the Jacksonville Public Library (ow.ly/uk8Ad). New club members fill out a form (either on paper or online at ow.ly/uk8qm) and answer a few questions about the kinds of music they typically enjoy. Each month, they’ll receive a mystery CD, chosen specifically for them by a team of music-loving library staff and shipped to their favorite branch. Before sending the selections we place a slip in the front of the jewel case, sometimes with a personal note. When the discs are ready to be picked up, patrons are notified just as with other holds.

    If your CD collection is gathering dust, here’s a brilliant idea to get them spinning again!

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  2. vintageanchorbooks:

Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.
Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.
More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

By the way, Adichie’s Americanah is on the fiction shortlist for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medal.
Good luck to all the nominees.

    vintageanchorbooks:

    Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.

    Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.

    More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

    By the way, Adichie’s Americanah is on the fiction shortlist for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medal.

    Good luck to all the nominees.

  3. Stepping into the Stream: Bringing Netflix-style Video to Libraries →

    Streaming video is well established in the consumer market (YouTube has been around since 2005 and Netflix since 2007) but is still gaining momentum in the library market. It’s not yet a huge category—LJ’s Materials Survey included downloadable/streaming movies as a category for the first time in 2013, finding that the responding libraries spent 0.6 percent of their materials budget on downloadable movies, which represented 0.9 percent of their total circulation—but it’s certainly on the rise.

    An excellent overview by LJ Media Editor Stephanie Klose.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  4. LJ Day of Dialog →

    Library Journal’s acclaimed Day of Dialog event brings together librarians, publishers, vendors and authors for a discussion of upcoming books and the latest trends in the world of libraries and publishing. This year will feature the ever-popular Editors’ Picks panel and hot author panels covering cookbooks, women’s fiction and top novelists for the fall/winter season. New to the line-up is a town-house style meeting run by librarians to discuss key issues in materials collection and promotion.

    We end the day with a closing reception and plenty of opportunities for author signings and networking. Come with an open mind and leave with a bag full of goodies and a head full of ideas!

    Tumblarians, coming to BookExpo this May? Be sure to register for our annual Day of Dialog event.

  5. Spring Best Debuts →

    Drawing on reviews, media coverage, and critics’ buzz, Prepub Alert Editor Barbara Hoffert has rounded up the essential debut novels that should be on librarians’ radars this spring. Here’s a sampling:

    Bond, Cynthia. Ruby. Hogarth: Crown. Apr. 2014. 336p. ISBN 9780804139090. $25; ebk. ISBN 9780804139106. LITERARY/HISTORICAL
    Highlighted by Edwidge Danticat in the New York Times last summer, this Discover Great New Writers pick brings a young woman back to her native Texas. “[The] dark and brutal redemptive beauty here… pays homage to the greats of Southern gothic literature.” (forthcoming LJ review)

    Davidson, Rjurik. Unwrapped Sky. Tor. Apr. 432p. ISBN 9780765329882. $25.95. SF
    Winner of an Aurealis Award and the Ditmar Award for Best New Talent for his short stories, Davidson goes longform in an LJ SF Debut of the Month that has “imaginative scope.” (LJ 3/15/14)

    Gay, Roxane. An Untamed State. Black Cat: Grove Atlantic. May 2014. 368p. ISBN 9780802122513. pap. $16. LITERARY
    Salon columnist, PANK coeditor, Rumpus essays editor, and a noted short story writer, Gay had a ready-made audience for her debut novel about a wealthy young Haitian woman’s kidnapping. “Not since Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper has an author so effectively captured the descent into mental instability.” (LJ 2/1/14)

    Holsinger, Bruce. A Burnable Book. Morrow. Feb. 2014. 464p. ISBN 9780062240323. $25.99. HISTORICAL
    Murder, mayhem, and a missing book in 1385 London have earned medieval scholar Hol­singer plenty of prepub raves, especially for the authentic detail: “Medieval England never tasted so rich nor smelled so foul.” (LJ 12/13)

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  6. classicpenguin:

    universitybookstore:

    Delighted to see Shirley Jackson having something of resurgence (again) with the Penguin reissue of her novels, and the Library of America edition of Novels and Stories.

    Glad you’re enjoying it! We’re so thrilled to be a part of this.

    There must be something in the air! The author of the classic short story “The Lottery” is also the protagonist  in a new psychological thriller entitled (what else?) Shirley (Blue Rider Pr., June) by Susan Scarf Merrell.

  7. cloudunbound:

    Heartiest of congratulations to the finalists of the 2014 RITA Awards, announced this week and representing Big Five and indie Cloud publishing partners. Romance is no stranger to self-publishing, as we all know. This is a genre that has never turned up its nose at new voices because it can’t afford to. So many readers to feed!

    I’m especially happy to note the presence of Courtney Milan, who self-publishes quite successfully and whose catalog comes to you via our contract with NLA Digital (check out their new website, with messaging for libraries). An entry in Milan’s best-selling Brothers Sinister series, The Heiress Effect was one of two self-published novels to make RUSA’s 2014 Reading List highlighting genre fiction. The other was Hugh Howey’s Wool, also available in Cloud from NLA Digital.

    So what have you learned? Ah, yes: self-publishing can equal quality. Look for more good stuff in the coming months.

  8. penguindesign:

The Pelicans are coming. 1 May 2014.
Sign up for updates at www.pelicanbooks.com

A new imprint is coming to town!

    penguindesign:

    The Pelicans are coming. 1 May 2014.

    Sign up for updates at www.pelicanbooks.com

    A new imprint is coming to town!

  9. Church Ladies, Preachers, Gangstas | African American Fiction (and More)

    Put on your best Sunday going-to-church hat but be sure to pack some heat with that Bible. Four solid African American inspirational titles populate this month’s column, but also included is a major urban fiction author’s latest work. Wahida Clark’s writing is loaded with thrills, but her characters’ faith relies on a .38 Special pistol.

    And kudos to columnist Rollie James Welch, the 2014 winner of the Allie Beth Martin Award. Sponsored by Baker & Taylor and presented by the Public Library Association (PLA), this award honors a public librarian for demonstrating a range and depth of knowledge about books and other library materials and the distinguished ability to share that knowledge. Although Rollie (formerly collection manager, Cleveland Public Library, and now principal librarian, adult collection development, Lee County Public Library, Fort Myers, FL) was cited for his work with YA resources and teen literature, he also credits the years of writing this column for his recognition. He joins such other RA notables as Kaite Maite Mediatore Stover, Angelina Benedetti, Rebecca Vnuk. Barry Trott, Barbara Genco, and Nancy Pearl. Keep up the excellent work, Rollie!—Ed.

  10. Part of the fan-studies stigma is, I hate to say it, perpetuated by academic hierarchies. Of course it’s a chicken-and-egg phenomenon, but it’s hard to break out of. So many fan studies scholars—many of the people doing the most interesting, crucial work, are adjunct or non-TT (tenure track). I do see this changing.

    (…)

    Anne is right, but it is a generational thing. Adjuncts are young scholars, as they age they will bring fan art into the discourse. I have watched this happen over the years in Mechademia.

    — 

    Anne Jamison and Frenchy Lunning from the “Future of Fanworks” chat with fan studies authors, going on right now. Join in! (via fanhackers)

    Academic tumblarians, are you collecting fan fiction or building a fan fiction studies collection?

  11. Count Your Chickens | Urban Farming & Homesteading

With the spread of farming and homesteading from rural and suburban areas to urban lots and rooftops, these 35 titles will help patrons sow the cream of their own crops.

I’m crowing about Kristi Chadwick’s most excellent collection development feature. 

    Count Your Chickens | Urban Farming & Homesteading

    With the spread of farming and homesteading from rural and suburban areas to urban lots and rooftops, these 35 titles will help patrons sow the cream of their own crops.

    I’m crowing about Kristi Chadwick’s most excellent collection development feature. 

  12. The Bard at 450 | Collection Development →

    As we approach William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, our fascination with his life and work shows no sign of fading. Each year brings new biographies, revised editions of the plays and poems, and books promising to make his creations easier for readers encountering them for the first time. It’s not an exaggeration to say that there are enough books about Shakespeare to fill an entire library. Readers and librarians alike are justified in feeling overwhelmed.

    Brush up your Shakespeare! Start quoting him now.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  13. willywaldo:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas
American Violet  (2008)
Brick Lane (2008)
Desert Flower (2009)
Dreams of Life (2011)
Heaven on Earth (2008)
I Will Follow (2011) 
Skin (2008)
The Patience Stone (2013)
Things Never Said (2013)
Yasmin (2004)
Women of Color in Friendship/Family films
Arranged (2007)
Chutney Popcorn (1999)
Eve’s Bayou (1997)
How the Garcia Girls Spent Their Summer (2005)
Radiance (1998)
Real Women Have Curves (2002)
The Joy Luck Club (1993)
The Sapphires (2011) 
Tortilla Soup (2001)
Waiting to Exhale (1995)
What’s Cooking? (2000)
Women of Color in RomComs
It’s a Wonderful Afterlife(2010)
Miss Dial (2013)
Young Girls of Color
Akeelah and the Bee (2006)
Anita and Me (2002)
Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012)
Life, Above All (2010)
Linda Linda Linda
Rabbit Proof Fence (2002)
Wadjda (2012)
Whale Rider (2002)
Xiu Xiu The Sent Down Girl (1998)
Yelling to the Sky (2011)
Queer Women of Color
Pariah (2011)
I Can’t Think Straight (2008)
Saving Face (2004)
Spider Lilies (2007)
The Journey (2004)
The Peculiar Kind s1 & s2 (web series) 
Yes or No 1 & 2


Great list. I’d like to add Mother of George (2013) and Satin Rouge (2002) to the mix.

    willywaldo:

    angelabassetts:

    Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

    Women of Color in Dramas

    Women of Color in Friendship/Family films

    Women of Color in RomComs

    Young Girls of Color

    Queer Women of Color


    Great list. I’d like to add Mother of George (2013) and Satin Rouge (2002) to the mix.

    (Source: hubbellgardner)

  14. Greetings my good nerdfellows:  →

    thehannahmachine:

    I’m looking for any articles you might know of on the information needs of trans* people (transgender, transsexual, trans, gender-nonconforming, nonbinary, genderqueer, agender, etc.) for a research project I’m doing on how libraries can better meet the needs of folks in this community. Any thoughts, leads, pointers, tips, citations, pdfs, would be great. I’m surveying the literature before starting my own project and not coming up with much. My ask and submissions are open! Or shoot me an email at hannah [hyphen] kane [at] uiowa [dot] edu

    If you don’t have anything for me, could you at least signal boost? I’d be much obliged.

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!

    Great project, Hannah. Spread the word, Tumblarians!

    I just did quick search of LJ’s website, and we did a few collection development articles and reviews. But there could be so much more.

    GLBTI Fiction: Opening the Fiction Closet

    http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/2013/08/collection-development/glbti-fiction-opening-the-fiction-closet/

    Out” on the Shelves: 26 Graphic Novels for Pride Month 2012

    http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/2012/05/books/graphic-novels/out-on-the-shelves-24-graphic-novels-for-pride-month-2012/

    Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Teen Literature

    http://bookverdict.com/details.xqy?uri=Product-56121878496858.xml

  15. nativeamericannews:

The Indian-Black Experience in North America
Confounding the Color Lineis an essential, interdisciplinary introduction to the myriad relationships forged for centuries between Indians and Blacks in North America. Since the days of slavery, the lives and destinies of Indians and Blacks have been entwined-thrown together through circumstance, institutional design, or personal choice. 

Collection development tumblrarians, folllow this excellent Tumblr blog, nativeamericanews, for more recommendations on books dealing with the Native American experience. 

    nativeamericannews:

    The Indian-Black Experience in North America

    Confounding the Color Lineis an essential, interdisciplinary introduction to the myriad relationships forged for centuries between Indians and Blacks in North America. Since the days of slavery, the lives and destinies of Indians and Blacks have been entwined-thrown together through circumstance, institutional design, or personal choice.

    Collection development tumblrarians, folllow this excellent Tumblr blog, nativeamericanews, for more recommendations on books dealing with the Native American experience.