1. cloudunbound:

    A sampling of Lee & Low’s award-winning titles. What a pleasure to see book jackets that reflect the world as it really is. See L&L’s blog, The Open Book, to track developments in #diverselit (a Twitter discussion they hold).

  2. School Library Journal has the world’s first Caldecott Medal infographic (we think).

    School Library Journal has the world’s first Caldecott Medal infographic (we think).

  3. School Library Journal's Friday Links Spectacular →

    schoollibraryjournal:

    We’ve got a doozy of a list for you this week.

    Prep for your next social gathering with these “20 Spectacularly Nerdy Dinosaur Jokes.” You’ll be the hit of the party…or get the chip bowl all to yourself. Either way, it’s a win. 

    That ancient philosophical question is tackled by Slate: “Is Big Bird an Order Muppet or a Chaos Muppet?” Talk amongst yourselves.

    Though I’m partial to Sully and Mike from Monsters, Inc., check out these other“lovable” movie monsters compiled by the folks at Flavorwire.

    What does a librarian look like? There’s a Tumblr for that.

    The Horn Book KidLit Election 2012 continues with the Lorax, Brian Robeson, and Ole Golly joining as third-party tickets

    Tolkien tourism is still going strong. And the New York Times has an awesome slideshow to prove it.

    Speaking of J.R.R., HarperCollins plans to publish a never-before-seen epic poem by the man who brought us Middle-earth.

    The National Book Award Finalists in Young People’s Lit have been announced.

    Think you know your “Goosebumps” books? Test your knowledge with a quiz.

  4. momalibrary:

Even Librarians Were Children Once
Here at the Library, the Century of the Child exhibition got us nostalgic for books that fascinated us as kids, especially those related to modern art.
We have several in the Library collection. My personal fave is Bruno Munari’s Circus in the Mist (1969). I was entranced by the way the vellum creates the feeling of deep, mysterious space. I’d be paging through it lovingly right now except that it’s currently on view in the galleries—in a play environment of the artist’s own design (Abitacolo [Cockpit] play environment, 1971).
Here are some of the other books that influenced library staff members. They’re on display in the reading room, so stop by for storytime. —jt
Faith Ringgold. Tar Beach (1991). –Lori Salmon, Library Assistant
Edward Gorey. The Gashlycrumb Tinies (1963). –Ian Goulston, Assistant Librarian, Cataloging
Bill Waterson. The Indispensable Calvin and Hobbes (1992). –Vickii Wong, Library Assistant
William Wegman. Little Red Riding Hood (1993). –Rachael Morrison, Senior Library Assistant
[insert dinosaur book here] –David Senior, Bibliographer
Paul Calle. The Pencil (1974) –Philip Parente, Senior Library Assistant
Munro Leaf and Ludwig Bemelmans. Noodle (1937). –Milan Hughston, Chief of the Library and Museum Archives

I remember this book!

    momalibrary:

    Even Librarians Were Children Once

    Here at the Library, the Century of the Child exhibition got us nostalgic for books that fascinated us as kids, especially those related to modern art.

    We have several in the Library collection. My personal fave is Bruno Munari’s Circus in the Mist (1969). I was entranced by the way the vellum creates the feeling of deep, mysterious space. I’d be paging through it lovingly right now except that it’s currently on view in the galleries—in a play environment of the artist’s own design (Abitacolo [Cockpit] play environment, 1971).

    Here are some of the other books that influenced library staff members. They’re on display in the reading room, so stop by for storytime. —jt

    Faith Ringgold. Tar Beach (1991). –Lori Salmon, Library Assistant

    Edward Gorey. The Gashlycrumb Tinies (1963). –Ian Goulston, Assistant Librarian, Cataloging

    Bill Waterson. The Indispensable Calvin and Hobbes (1992). –Vickii Wong, Library Assistant

    William Wegman. Little Red Riding Hood (1993). –Rachael Morrison, Senior Library Assistant

    [insert dinosaur book here] –David Senior, Bibliographer

    Paul Calle. The Pencil (1974) –Philip Parente, Senior Library Assistant

    Munro Leaf and Ludwig Bemelmans. Noodle (1937). –Milan Hughston, Chief of the Library and Museum Archives

    I remember this book!

  5. School Library Journal: Friday Links →

    schoollibraryjournal:

    Tessa Dahl writes about growing up with her famous father, Roald Dahl.

    The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary has added 10 new words, including “e-reader,” “man cave,” and “bucket list.”

    Books That Shaped America,” an exhibit at the Library of Congress, features 88 books, including Goodnight Moon and The Catcher in the Rye.

    Yum! Images of doughnuts paired with literary quotes

    “It has always been my belief that people who spend too much time with my work end up as lost souls, drained of reason, who lead lives of raving emptiness and occasional lunatic violence. What a relief it is to see this documented,” Lemony Snicket said in response to reality TV star Lauren Conrad destroying his book for a D.I.Y. Project.

    And finally, via SLJ editor Shelley Diaz comes this “professional assessment” of a My Little Pony librarian.

    Happy Friday!