1. Why you should ignore the superlatives on book jackets →

    Tumblrarians, do book blurbs sway your purchasing decisions?  I tend to be a bit wary when I am considering titles to assign. Too often it’s authors logrolling their other writer friends.

  2. I also would like to say: You really should have kids review the children’s books (especially reviewers who are the same age as the kids whom the book is intended for).

    — Second grader Rosa Cohn in a letter to the New York Times (via schoollibraryjournal)

  3. Do you know chickens? I am talking live chickens, chickens that live in your backyard, chicken memoirs, chicken breeds, etc. I am looking for reviewers of chicken and poultry books for Library Journal. Email me if you are interested!

    Do you know chickens? I am talking live chickens, chickens that live in your backyard, chicken memoirs, chicken breeds, etc. I am looking for reviewers of chicken and poultry books for Library Journal. Email me if you are interested!

  4. Do you know anything about beekeeping? I want you to review books for me! You’ll be published in Library Journal and showered in free bee books. Email me if you are interested!

    Do you know anything about beekeeping? I want you to review books for me! You’ll be published in Library Journal and showered in free bee books. Email me if you are interested!

  5. From Today’s LJ Reviews Newsletter

    by Henrietta Thornton

    At LJ we’re all about the content, not the container. Our reviews editors provide material using various vehicles—print, email, a blog, regular web articles, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest…the list goes on, as it should, because people have different learning styles and different times/situations that are best for reading. (Subway, anyone?) Since it’s a lengthy and growing list, I thought I’d list the venues here to give you the latest on what might suit your needs.

    The core of our reviews endeavor is the print magazine that’s published 20 times a year. Our print reviews appear in what we call “the back of the book,” as well as in various forms on our website and reproduced in full in our BookVerdict database. Sprinkled among our reviews is related coverage such as Q&As with authors, librarians, publishers, and others in our industry. We also regularly run long features such as the recent Erotica: Full-Frontal Shelving, for my money the best piece on erotica readers’ advisory you’ll find anywhere, and timely roundups like this spring look at baseball titles.

    As well as the regular reviews, on our website you’ll also find our book and media related columns. These come in several flavors: collection development pieces explain how to build core collections in various subject areas; readers’ advisory coverage recommends ways to “sell” those materials to your patrons; and our PrePub Alert discusses what publishers have in the pipeline, up to six months in advance, as well as provides related interviews and more.

    Then there are our newsletters. (Yes, we’re busy.) As well as the one you’re currently reading, the reviews staff produces a newsletter version of PrePub Alert, which delivers the material discussed above to your inbox every week; LJ Review Alert, which lists the reviews that will appear in upcoming issues; and LJXpress, which among other things offers online-only reviews of e-original romances and of graphic novels and other materials.

    (Subscribe, if you haven’t already.)

  6. There is so much that can be said about the good a book can do to expose readers to new places, new ways of life. (For instance, the glimpse Katherine Boo gave to American readers of Mumbai life in Behind the Beautiful Forevers.) There’s even more to be said about what a book can do for readers who have never found their own lives on the page before. (How many books tell the kind of story Jessamyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones does?) It’s the job of book review editors—as guides to the overwhelming volume of titles published every year—to draw readers’ attention to the kind of books that can broaden their world, that tell the kind of stories that have never been told in print before. These books are out there, we just need to do a better job of finding and recognizing them.

    — 

    I Did the Math: Towards a More Diverse NYT Notable Book List

    I wrote about the New York Times's list of 100 Notable Books of 2012.

  7. The fire of personal enthusiasm is what really makes for the best advice on what to read next, a quality rarely found in an ordinary book review. That burst of incandescent awareness and pleasure that only a good book can give us often becomes an uncontrollable desire to grab complete strangers by the lapels and demand that they, too, read this book, right now, on the double. Drop everything. Do it.

    — 

    Maria Bustillos, What To Read Next: The New Yorker (via housingworksbookstore)

    What are your go-to recommendations? What should I read next?

    (via strandbooks)

  8. WHEN SOMEONE ACTUALLY READS MY BOOK REVIEWS

    librarianproblems:

    Major major GPOLJ.

  9. "I was impressed by the playfulness and the levity of the email, but I also thought: This may be the most sadistic moment of belated fact-checking in the history of mankind." →

    Your LJ tumblrer has a lot of feelings about this essay. I am still processing them.

  10. I am also always looking for people to review law titles, true crime, business books, communications (journalism), travel, psychology, health and medicine. Email me to learn how to apply!

  11. Are you a librarian interested in reviewing books about tattoos? Email me!

  12. There’s something about this whole piece, and you should read the whole thing, that indicates that she doesn’t like reading books that everyone else isn’t already talking about — she doesn’t want to be left out of the literary conversation. I know I am reading way too much into this. But it seems like that is the problem with the New Yorker and fiction anyway. They are waiting for other people to tell them what’s good. Rather than using their position to establish and lead the conversation themselves.

    — 

    A justifiably exasperated Jessa Crispin, on New Yorker editor Elizabeth Minkel’s essay at the Millions that explains why she rarely reads books by international authors.

    This makes me think a lot about how I assign books for review, but there are some important differences between a little-known translated novel and a self-published book about vaccines and autism, between fiction and nonfiction.

    (via mollitudo)

  13. The Internet has been amazing for book talk. There is more of it, and at a higher quality, than perhaps at any other moment, certainly in my lifetime. Dinosaurs love to lament the lost space in newspaper book reviews; a few years ago, the National Book Critics Circle fought, what seemed to me, a self-serving campaign to save the book review, by which a handful of people really wanted to save their right to sell the same lame 450-word book report to a handful of regional dailies. You didn’t have to bother reading the book to write many of those reviews, and as a one-time daily books editor myself, who once assigned reviews to some of those active in this debate, it was clear that many critics did not. Now we have the Rumpus and the Awl and The Millions and the Morning News and Maud Newton and Bookslut and the Nervous Breakdown and Full-Stop and the Los Angeles Review of Books and HTMLgiant and you get the idea. Professional freelancers didn’t save the book review – the battle was won by the Internet and people who love reading. The culture is richer for it.

    — 

    Dave Daley

    Thanks for the shout!

    (via millionsmillions)

  14. Re: Vida stats, sexism makes no business sense when you consider women in the U.S. read more books and use libraries more frequently than men.

    — Editor, LJ Book Review, Heather McCormack on the newest set of VIDA statistics “counting the rates of publication between women and men in many of our writing world’s most prestigious literary outlets.”

  15. spectercollective:

    Sh*t Book Reviewers Say (by ronacharles)

    I have got to get myself one of those turquoise turtleneck / yellow blazer combos going.