1. tayarijones:

    I’m fascinated by all the covers of Ann Petry’s novel, THE STREET.  I read it in college under a totally classroom-suitable cover. Who knew it was originally marketed so va-va-voomily.

    Tumblarians, do you have this classic in your collection.? Interesting how covers range from tastefully literary to pulpy noir. Different strokes for different kinds of reading folks. 

  2. idea-lab:

    BONUS BADASS LIBRARY CARD SIGNUP MONTH FRIDAY

    (The more fun version of National Library Card Signup month. If you don’t have a library card, get thee to a library and obtain one!)

    I got the idea of trying out different sets of eyes with book covers. American Psycho just looked perfect for the makeover. (Look of disapproval, googly eyes, and the very creepy Steve Buscemi, respectively.) I have some others in mind, but I’m open to other suggestions.

    What book covers should I do next?

    LIttle Women? Jurassic Park? Any suggestions for idea-lab?

  3. Maybe this idea that there are ‘girl books’ and ‘boy books’ and ‘chick lit’ and ‘whatever is the guy equivalent of chick lit’ gives credit to absolutely no one, especially not the boys who will happily read stories by women, about women. As a lover of books and someone who supports readers and writers of both sexes, I would love a world in which books are freed from some of these constraints. Maybe we should do boys the favor we girls received—a reading diet featuring books by and about the opposite sex. Clearly, it must work.

    — Maureen Johnson, “The Gender Coverup” (via schoollibraryjournal)

  4. arjache:

Powell’s presents a compelling argument.

Yes. Yes.

    arjache:

    Powell’s presents a compelling argument.

    Yes. Yes.

  5. You can choose jacket of Elizabeth Gilbert’s new novel | USA Today

Gilbert and publisher Viking spent two months battling over the jacket. “I was going to be a diva and throw my weight around,” recalls Gilbert, until she realized: “There’s a very easy answer to this question.”
Which is why fans can view the three potential covers, which are now posted on Gilbert’s Facebook page. On Thursday morning beginning at 8 a.m. ET, fans can cast their vote for the one they like best. Voting will close at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday. The winner, which will appear on the U.S. edition of The Signature of All Things, will be announced the next day at 5:00 p.m.

    You can choose jacket of Elizabeth Gilbert’s new novel | USA Today

    Gilbert and publisher Viking spent two months battling over the jacket. “I was going to be a diva and throw my weight around,” recalls Gilbert, until she realized: “There’s a very easy answer to this question.”

    Which is why fans can view the three potential covers, which are now posted on Gilbert’s Facebook page. On Thursday morning beginning at 8 a.m. ET, fans can cast their vote for the one they like best. Voting will close at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday. The winner, which will appear on the U.S. edition of The Signature of All Things, will be announced the next day at 5:00 p.m.

  6. (via New Stephen’s Lighthouse)

    (via New Stephen’s Lighthouse)

  7. thepinakes:

Adventures in Weeding: at some point, a graphic designer said to someone, “Hey, how about a hairy guy in a loincloth climbing into a statue’s nose?,” and a publisher said, “yes, that’s a good idea.”
The only thing not surprising about that exchange is that it took place in 1978.

“Hey, how about a hairy guy in a loincloth climbing into a statue’s nose?”
“Yes, that’s a good idea.”

    thepinakes:

    Adventures in Weeding: at some point, a graphic designer said to someone, “Hey, how about a hairy guy in a loincloth climbing into a statue’s nose?,” and a publisher said, “yes, that’s a good idea.”

    The only thing not surprising about that exchange is that it took place in 1978.

    “Hey, how about a hairy guy in a loincloth climbing into a statue’s nose?”

    “Yes, that’s a good idea.”

  8. Maybe it had something to do with the fact that finding a young black man on a middle grade novel this year is a rarity. I’ve seen a large swath of titles from every American publisher there is (as well as a few Canadians) and this report is the sum total of all the middle grade (not early chapter book, not YA) fiction fare I have found that shows the hero front and center. Note that the low numbers have a lot to do with the fact that even finding any stories starring black guys is difficult.

    — From SLJ, Book Jacket Nattering: Invisible Boys.

  9. harperbooks:

laughingsquid:

Matchbook., Bathing Suits Matched With Their Book Cover Counterpart

For those interested in going all-out with their beach reads…

    harperbooks:

    laughingsquid:

    Matchbook., Bathing Suits Matched With Their Book Cover Counterpart

    For those interested in going all-out with their beach reads…

  10. darienlibrary:

Last year, Chad Harbach’s divisive baseball bildungsroman The Art of Fielding had its title curlicued across the front, like the franchise name on an old-style home-team jersey; meanwhile, Pulitzer Prize winner Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot introduced itself to the world in a disarmingly dressed-down fashion, its name hurriedly jotted down over a comic-book graphic of a wedding band.
(via Book Cover Clones: Why Do So Many Recent Novels Look Alike? - Ashley Fetters - The Atlantic)

    darienlibrary:

    Last year, Chad Harbach’s divisive baseball bildungsroman The Art of Fielding had its title curlicued across the front, like the franchise name on an old-style home-team jersey; meanwhile, Pulitzer Prize winner Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot introduced itself to the world in a disarmingly dressed-down fashion, its name hurriedly jotted down over a comic-book graphic of a wedding band.

    (via Book Cover Clones: Why Do So Many Recent Novels Look Alike? - Ashley Fetters - The Atlantic)

  11. racebending:

90% of Young Adult book covers in 2011 featured a white character.

H/T morerobots

    racebending:

    90% of Young Adult book covers in 2011 featured a white character.

    H/T morerobots

  12. "The truth is, women who write literary fiction frequently find themselves in an unjust world, even as young single women are outearning men in major American cities and higher education in the United States is skewing female. As VIDA, a women’s literary organization, showed in February in its second annual statistical roundup, women get shockingly short shrift as reviewers and reviewees in most prestigious publications. Of all the authors reviewed in the publications it tracked, nearly three-fourths were men. No wonder that when we talk about today’s leading novelists — the ones who generate heat and conversation and are read by both men and women — we are talking mostly about men.

    [T]he top tier of literary fiction — where the air is rich and the view is great and where a book enters the public imagination and the current conversation — tends to feel peculiarly, disproportionately male. Will the literary habits of a culture change as younger readers take over? Will more literary women be able to persuade their publishers to keep that photo of a longhaired young girl in a summer dress facing shyly away from the camera off their book jackets and replace it with a neutral illustration and bold typeface? Will VIDA’s statistics dramatically improve? And will “Women’s Fiction” become such an absurd category it’s phased out entirely? Maybe, in a more just world.”

    -Meg Wolitzer’s "The Second Shelf: On the Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women"

  13. mswyrr:

    Writer Jim C. Hines “Striking a Pose (Women and Fantasy Covers)