1. The New Age: Leaving Behind Everything, Or Nothing At All →

    Don’t toss out your old VCRs or Macs just yet.

    Among those grappling with this challenge are archivists at the . The organization at the University of Maryland advises universities on how to handle archives and keeps a large collection of antiquated technology — from floppy disk drives to film reels and to VCRs.

    The archivists of today need to stock those machines in order to read, copy and generally access all sorts of historical records. MITH Associate Director Trevor Muñoz says that means researchers often troll eBay for long-forgotten electronic equipment to make things work.

  2. Japanese Tech Company to Digitize Vatican Library Archives →

    uicspecialcollections:

    This could be amazing!

  3. http://biblioboard.tumblr.com/post/81604553143/looking-to-preserve-some-local-history-check-out →

    biblioboard:

    Looking to preserve some local history? Check out the way Maryville University used BiblioBoard Creator to create an Anthology of graduation photographs of Maryville University alumni.

    Here’s what Ying Lin, Assistant Professor of the University Library and Electronic Resources &…

  4. libralthinking:

    uispeccoll:

    Did you know we have massive fandom related collections in UISpecColl?  50th anniversary of Doctor Who!  I had to go exploring.

    Monday I pulled out all the Doctor Who fanzines in the collection and we spontaneously filmed a video looking at them!  

    With: 

    Colleen Theisen, Outreach & Instruction Librarian for UISpecColl

    Peter Balestrieri, Processing Librarian for UISpecColl

    Patrick Olson, Special Collections Librarian for UISpecColl

    Lisa Martincik, Electronic Resources Librarian for UI Libraries

    Most importantly: Film & Editing by Matthew Butler, Multimedia Consultant, who always takes our crazy banter and somehow puts it together in a way that makes sense.

    SUBSCRIBE ON YOUTUBE!

    Guide to Doctor Who fanzines in the University of Iowa Special Collections & University Archives:

    Brian Knapp Fanzine Collection, MsC 294

    Collection of fanzines and science fiction convention materials from Connecticut-based fan Knapp, mostly dealing with Star Trek but including other media properties as well.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0294

    Celeste Hotaling-Lyons Fanzine Collection, MsC 400

    Fan writer and editor. A collection of science fiction fanzines, primarily consisting of pieces of fan fiction, and a few related items, including some science fiction convention materials.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0400

    M. Horvat Genre Apazines Collection, MsC 825

    A collection of science fiction, fantasy, mystery and other genre apazines (publications similar to newsletters or fanzines, and published by fan groups called Amateur Press Associations, or apas).  Horvat founded the American Private Press Association and for a time in the 1980s edited “South of the Moon”, a catalog of publications of amateur press associations.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0825

    Mariellen (Ming) Wathne Fanzine Archives Collection, MsC 313

    The Fanzine Archives was designed to preserve and circulate fanzines and other fannish material through the maintenance of an extensive permanent archive, and came to the University of Iowa in 2008.  Large assemblage of fanzines and works of fan fiction relating to multiple media fandoms, including Star Trek, Star Wars, and other movies and television shows.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0313

    Deidre Johnson Media Fandom Materials Collection, MsC 960

    Collection focused on the television series Battlestar Galactica.  Material formats include books, magazines, fanzines, comic books, catalogs, clippings, scripts, and merchandise.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0960

    Morgan Dawn Fanzines and Fanvids Collection, MsC 403

    Collection of fanzines and fanvids (fan-created montages of video clips from assorted media fandoms set to music) relating to numerous media fandoms, assembled by long-time fan writer and vidder Dawn.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0403

    Susan Hill Fanzine Collection , MsC 401

    Science fiction fan and fanzine collector. Collection of fanzines - mostly works of fan fiction, with particular emphasis on multimedia anthologies and on the British science fiction TV show Blake’s 7.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0401

    Organization for Transformative Works Fanzine and Fan Fiction Collection, MsC 320

    Collection of science fiction and other genre fanzines, pieces of fan fiction, and related fannish artifacts donated by various fans through the cooperation of the Organization for Transformative Works, established to preserve the history of fanworks and fan culture.

    http://collguides.lib.uiowa.edu/?MSC0320

    I love my job.

    O mein Gott! I’m hyperventilating! All those acid-free boxes! I’m flashing back to my archives class in library school.

  5. A legend in its own time, the archive of the McSweeney’s publishing company has been acquired by the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin. Founder of the 15-year-old enterprise Dave Eggers says at the end of his statement, “We thank the Ransom Center for taking on our archive and for cleaning out our basement.”

    — 

    Okay, that’s fucking cool. (via rachelfershleiser)

    Holler.

  6. chicadificil:

    Today’s cataloging moment! Why do I have to catalog these…the “Tell-A-Maid” series left me with a bad taste in my mouth and conflicted. It also brought back memories of my abuelita and the current employment of my tias and primas who clean houses and take care of other women’s children in order to support their families.

    In a response (to my emoticon reply), Alyssa said, “I want to see the validity and purpose in cataloging these kind of items but it is hard. I guess I can see them as a historical document since they will be housed in special collections and I am hoping students will use them to question their purpose and maybe take offense in why they were created. Maybe they will miraculously disappear….hopefully!”

  7. gov-info:

LOC Gov Doc: 10 Resources for Community Digital Archives 
"We write frequently on this blog about the value of personal digital archiving–empowering people to pass on digital memories to their families and others. We’ve always seen public libraries as key allies in promoting personal archiving, and have highlighted libraries that undertake outreach and training in this area.
There is a related role for public libraries and allied organizations: facilitating development of community digital archives. A community collection could consist of born-digital and digitized images, audio, text or other cultural heritage materials that document local history. Community members use the collection to get a deeper understanding of their location, and people often are eager to donate their own personal materials.
This is an approach that has been gaining ground over the last few years. The American Library Association recently suggested that public libraries consider digital special collections as a strategic option in planning for the future.
Here, in no special order, are 10 resources that provide useful insight into developing, managing and accessing community digital archives.
Digital Public Library of America Digital Hubs Program, “A national network out of the over forty state/regional digital libraries and myriad large digital libraries in the US, bringing together digitized content from across the country into a single access point for end users, and an open platform for developers.”
Houston Area Digital Archives. Accessed via the Internet Archives, “the Houston Area Digital Archives provides open, online access to the rich collections of the Houston Public Library and other community archives.”
Denver Public Library, Creating Your Community. “The Denver Public Library’s mission is to connect people with information, ideas and experiences to provide enjoyment, enrich lives and strengthen our community. The Creating Your Community project was developed to engage the community to share and connect with their history in new ways using technology, partnerships and outreach programming.”
Arlington County (Va.) Public Library, Arlington Community Archive. Collection of historical documents that narrate the history of Arlington County, its citizens, organizations, and social issues. Researchers can find personal papers, photographs, and archival records of local organizations, clubs, and associations.
Community Archives and Heritage Group.   A national group which aims to support and promote community archives in the UK and Ireland. The site provides an extensive list of advice and guidance, as well as a directory of individual archives.
Jones Public Library, Amherst, MA, Digital Amherst. “Brings our Town’s history alive through a collection of images, multimedia, and documents that reflect the independent spirit of our people, creative works, and culture.”
START AN ARCHIVES! ”A blog about the trials and tribulations of starting a community archives,” by an archivist in Philadelphia, Pa.
Hershey (Pa.) Community Archives. “All the partners recognized that… Hershey’s historical record was at risk. Today the Archives serves as a corporate archives to The Hershey Company, Hershey Trust Company and Hershey Entertainment and Resorts Company while also serving as a repository for community and local organizations’ records.”
History Grand Rapids.org. ”It is the plan of the Grand Rapids Historical Commission to collect images from the personal collections of local families, local archives of public and private institutions and organizations, and other local sources that reflect and reveal family and community life and the ways in which Grand Rapids people worked, traveled, educated and enjoyed themselves from the mid-nineteenth through the twentieth century.”
The Mass. Memories Road Show at UMass Boston. “An event-based public history project that digitizes family photos and memories shared by the people of Massachusetts. University Archives staff work with local planning teams to organize free public events where residents are invited to bring family photos to be scanned and included in this digital archive.”
by Bill LeFurgy, Library of Congress Digital Signals

    gov-info:

    LOC Gov Doc: 10 Resources for Community Digital Archives

    "We write frequently on this blog about the value of personal digital archiving–empowering people to pass on digital memories to their families and others. We’ve always seen public libraries as key allies in promoting personal archiving, and have highlighted libraries that undertake outreach and training in this area.

    There is a related role for public libraries and allied organizations: facilitating development of community digital archives. A community collection could consist of born-digital and digitized images, audio, text or other cultural heritage materials that document local history. Community members use the collection to get a deeper understanding of their location, and people often are eager to donate their own personal materials.

    This is an approach that has been gaining ground over the last few years. The American Library Association recently suggested that public libraries consider digital special collections as a strategic option in planning for the future.

    Here, in no special order, are 10 resources that provide useful insight into developing, managing and accessing community digital archives.

    Digital Public Library of America Digital Hubs Program, “A national network out of the over forty state/regional digital libraries and myriad large digital libraries in the US, bringing together digitized content from across the country into a single access point for end users, and an open platform for developers.”

    Houston Area Digital Archives. Accessed via the Internet Archives, “the Houston Area Digital Archives provides open, online access to the rich collections of the Houston Public Library and other community archives.”

    Denver Public Library, Creating Your Community. “The Denver Public Library’s mission is to connect people with information, ideas and experiences to provide enjoyment, enrich lives and strengthen our community. The Creating Your Community project was developed to engage the community to share and connect with their history in new ways using technology, partnerships and outreach programming.”

    Arlington County (Va.) Public Library, Arlington Community Archive. Collection of historical documents that narrate the history of Arlington County, its citizens, organizations, and social issues. Researchers can find personal papers, photographs, and archival records of local organizations, clubs, and associations.

    Community Archives and Heritage Group.   A national group which aims to support and promote community archives in the UK and Ireland. The site provides an extensive list of advice and guidance, as well as a directory of individual archives.

    Jones Public Library, Amherst, MA, Digital Amherst. “Brings our Town’s history alive through a collection of images, multimedia, and documents that reflect the independent spirit of our people, creative works, and culture.”

    START AN ARCHIVES! ”A blog about the trials and tribulations of starting a community archives,” by an archivist in Philadelphia, Pa.

    Hershey (Pa.) Community Archives. “All the partners recognized that… Hershey’s historical record was at risk. Today the Archives serves as a corporate archives to The Hershey Company, Hershey Trust Company and Hershey Entertainment and Resorts Company while also serving as a repository for community and local organizations’ records.”

    History Grand Rapids.org. ”It is the plan of the Grand Rapids Historical Commission to collect images from the personal collections of local families, local archives of public and private institutions and organizations, and other local sources that reflect and reveal family and community life and the ways in which Grand Rapids people worked, traveled, educated and enjoyed themselves from the mid-nineteenth through the twentieth century.”

    The Mass. Memories Road Show at UMass Boston. “An event-based public history project that digitizes family photos and memories shared by the people of Massachusetts. University Archives staff work with local planning teams to organize free public events where residents are invited to bring family photos to be scanned and included in this digital archive.”

  8. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: Remembering Aimé Césaire →

    schomburgcenter:

    image

    Today we remember Aimé Césaire, a leading advocate in black consciousness and one of the founders of the literary and ideological movement of Negritude — black consciousness and pride.

    Poet, writer, politician and anti-colonial activist Aimé Césaire was born on June 26, 1913, in Basse-Pointe, Martinique. Mr. Césaire attended high school and college in France, and in 1937 he married another student from Martinique, Suzanne Roussi.

    The Caribbean island of Martinique is administratively and politically a region of France and its citizens are French citizens. Césaire served as mayor of Fort-de-France, the capital city, and was elected representative of Martinique from 1945-2001.

    Césaire’s contributions to Francophone literature are invaluable in the the cultivation of awareness and pride in Black African/ African diaspora cultures. Césaire was a voice for the voiceless, and was considered as a mentor by many including the revolutionary writer, psychiatrist, and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Césaire’s works espoused on themes that are universal and humanizing such as this excerpt from his famous work, a surrealist poem entitled “Cahier d’un retour au pays natal” - translated as “Notebook of a Return to the Native Land”:

    I would go to this land of mine and I would say to it:

    Embrace me without fear…

    And if all I can do is speak, it is for you I should speak.

    The Schomburg Center just gets me.

  9. schomburgcenter:

    Today is Juneteenth, which commemorates the ending of slavery in Texas on June 19, 1865. Although the Emancipation Proclamation was issued by Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, it was not enforced in the state of Texas due to a lack of Union troop presence and enforcement in the confederate state.

    However on June 19, 1865, Union soldiers led by Major General Gordon Granger and his regiment  entered Galveston, Texas to override the resistance to the law and to enforce the Executive Orders. Union Major-General Gordon Granger read General Orders, No.3 to the people of Galveston. It stated:

    “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.”

    Since 1865 black Americans have regarded June 19th as the official emancipation day, and on January 1, 1980, the state of Texas proclaimed June 19 an official state holiday thanks to the African American state legislator Al Edwards.

    Should be a national holiday, I think! Happy Juneteenth!

  10. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: Historical Tribute: Medgar Evers →

    schomburgcenter:

    Today marks the 50th Anniversary of civil rights activist Medgar Evers’ death on June 12, 1963. To commemorate Medgar Evers’ legacy we offer the inspirational song “Mississippi Goddam” created by Nina Simone following Evers’ assassination.  Evers’ life and death played a significant role in the civil rights movement to end Jim Crow laws.  After serving in WWII war, Evers returned to the U.S.,  a segregated society where blacks were treated inferiorly, which led him to commit his life to the empowerment of black people on  a grassroots level working for the NAACP. His legacy is memorialized from the naming of educational institution after him, Medgar Evers College, in Brooklyn, New York, to the naming of a U.S. navy cargo ship in his honor—USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE-13), to songs by the musicians Nina Simone, Bob Dylan, and Phil Ochs , to television series and books. Join the Schomburg in commemorating Medgar Evers by sharing his legacy.

  11. schomburgcenter:

    To see Josephine Baker’s dance sequence skip to 2:27.  Happy Spring!

    JOSEPHINE. A million times yes.

  12. uispeccoll:

    Miniature Mondays!  This new acquisition for the Charlotte Smith Miniature Book collections is The Pit and the Pendulum from Edgar Allan Poe.  This is designed, published and bound in leather in limited edition of 20 numbered and signed copies by Jarmila Sobota, in Loket, Czech Republic, 2005.  See it in the catalog, or stop by anytime to read and admire this tiny work.

    Clearly I am a huge sucker for library gifs.

  13. jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a lovely decorated initial from a fourteenth century manuscript produced in England.
Image source: British Library MS Lansdowne 475. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

I love the way this letter looks like an amoeba or space.

    jothelibrarian:

    Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a lovely decorated initial from a fourteenth century manuscript produced in England.

    Image source: British Library MS Lansdowne 475. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

    I love the way this letter looks like an amoeba or space.

  14. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: thefindingaid: The Finding Aid: Black Women at the Intersection of Art... →

    thefindingaid:

    The Finding Aid: Black Women at the Intersection of Art and Archiving is an interactive, multi-media dialogue that explores the intersection of experimental art practices and community-based archiving.

    The event’s organization is based on the idea of a finding aid. A finding aid is a document used in archives for accessibility and discovery. We will transform a finding aid from an archival inventory/guide into an artistic archival experience.

    Our goal for this event is that people leave knowing what an archive and archivist is or can be, and that people feel empowered to begin their own archival/artistic practice or feel moved to engage with existing archives.

    Tuesday, May 21, 2013 @ 6:30pm

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

    Langston Hughes Auditorium

    ***

    image

    image

    Joyce-LeeAnn is a writer, archivist and performance artist from Denver, Colorado based in Brooklyn, New York. She received a BA in Writing and Literature from Naropa University via Hampton University. She received a MILS with an Archives Certificate from Pratt Institute. She works as a professional project archivist. Joyce-LeeAnn’s writing explores the poetics of archival processing and investigates ways to tell stories through preserved documents. Subjects covered in her prose | poetry include: grief, healing processes, beautiful moments, writings on restroom walls and a fragment of black Denver history. Her experimental literary performances usually include a makeshift typewriter-drum-kit.

    // joyceleeann.com

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    Kameelah Janan Rasheed (b. 1985) is a photo-based artist, writer, and educator from East Palo Alto, CA based in Brooklyn, NY. She is a Gallery/Studio Instructor at the Brooklyn Museum as well as a public school teacher working with court involved youth in East New York. Kameelah’s work enlists archival as well as archaeological traditions to explore collective memory and her family narratives through found images from eBay and estate sells, material objects, and original photography. An object-based body of work, she interrogates the trinity of spatial trauma within Black communities — homelessness, incarceration, and forced migration and how this influences both collective memory and the way we reconstruct narratives from material fragments. Currently, she is an Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Book Arts. In 2012, Kameelah was an Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Photography at Woodstock. She will have her first solo exhibit at Real Art Ways in July 2013 tentatively entitled The Imagined Archive. A former Fulbright Scholar to South Africa, Kameelah received her Master of Education from Stanford University and a Bachelor of Arts in Policy and Africana Studies from Pomona College.

    //kameelahr.com

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    Marilyn Nance is an American visual artist known for her images of 20th century African American life—spirituality, music, art, and African retentions, She grew up through many movements—The Civil Rights Movement, Black Power, Black Arts, Anti War, Students Rights, the Women’s Movement, and the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

    A two-time finalist for the W. Eugene Smith Award in Humanistic Photography, her photographs can be found in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and in the Library of Congress.

    //marilynnance.com

    Image © Albert Chong

    image

    Arianne Edmonds is a Los Angeles native, storyteller and archivist. Her historical collection spans from 1886-1950 and explores the uniqueness of early black Los Angeles, through the lens of genealogy. She received her Bachelors of Science in Communications, from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and started her career in educational media at Sesame Workshop. She currently works with the Taproot Foundation managing consultant relations and community partnerships.

    // edmondsfamilyexploration.tumblr.com

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    Ladi’Sasha Jones is a is a collector and witness worker of oral history narratives with a special interest in documenting Black women’s stories and Black American family life. She approaches her documentation practice by working from the intersections of cultural equity and collective community memory.

    Currently, Ladi’Sasha is working on the curation of a public forum to share her collection of oral history records via a digital sound art gallery — coming Summer 2013. Having earned her B.A. in African American Studies from Temple University in 2010 and a M.A. in Arts Politics from NYU Tisch School of the Arts in 2012, she recently completed a Certificate in Oral History from Baylor University in April of 2013. She aims to move towards freelancing and sharing her documenting services with community and cultural arts organizations along with individual artists.

    //ladijones.com

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    Shawn(ta) Smithis a lesbian separatist, writer, archivist and reference librarian. Her essays blend storytelling with documentation and archiving. Her work will appear in “Black Gay Genius Interview with Lisa C. Moore” in Black Gay Genius: Joseph Beam and In the Life (forthcoming).  She is currently editing a new anthology Her Saturn Returns: Queer Women of Color Life Transitions, a compilation of narratives of queer women and color in their Saturn.  Shawn is a collective member of the Lesbian Herstory Archives and the WOW Cafe Theater where she co-produces Rivers of Honey, a monthly Cabaret highlighting the art of women of color. Shawn is pursuing her MFA in Fiction at Queens College while working as a reference & instruction librarian at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  She is the former Archive Coordinator for StoryCorps.

    //hersaturnreturns.com //riversofhoney.com

     Photo © Arianne Benford

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    Sonia Louise Davis(b. 1988, New York City) is an artist and photographer. Using a large format view camera, her work mines the public and private archive, exploring collective memory and family history through site-specific and community-based projects. Sonia is currently participating in the Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) Program at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. An honors graduate of Wesleyan University, she holds a BA in African American Studies, with a concentration in Music and Visual Art.

    //sonialouisedavis.com

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    Born in Las Vegas,Salome Asega is an Ethiopian visual artist and independent curator working in Brooklyn.  She received her BA in Transnational Visual Art and Social Practice from the Gallatin School at NYU and is currently an MFA candidate in the Design and Technology program at Parsons The New School for Design. She is also a founding member of the Sistah Friends Project.

    //eyesearsmouth.com

    The intersection of art and archiving? Yes please.

  15. usnatarchives:

Freedmen who fled from slavery during and after the Civil War did not expect that their flight toward freedom would lead to sickness, disease, and death. As Jim Downs reveals in Sick from Freedom, the war produced the largest biological crisis of the 19th century.
Join us Friday, May 17, at noon at the National Archives in Washington, DC, for “Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction.”
You can also watch online as we stream this program live on our Ustream channel.
A book signing will follow the program.

    usnatarchives:

    Freedmen who fled from slavery during and after the Civil War did not expect that their flight toward freedom would lead to sickness, disease, and death. As Jim Downs reveals in Sick from Freedom, the war produced the largest biological crisis of the 19th century.

    Join us Friday, May 17, at noon at the National Archives in Washington, DC, for “Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction.”

    You can also watch online as we stream this program live on our Ustream channel.

    A book signing will follow the program.