1. 
Snow and cold presented transportation challenges in getting to Philadelphia for the American Library Association (ALA)’s 2014 Midwinter conference, leading some exhibitors to express disappointment in the light crowds on the exhibit floor, though ALA reports attendance of 12,207. This total tops those for recent Midwinters in San Diego, Dallas, and Seattle’s, but the growth came from more exhibitors themselves and exhibitor-invited complimentary attendees. Those hardy, or lucky, librarians that did make it got some good leads and found excitement in a number of places. Besides grabbing the many galleys on offer and lining up for signings, the presence of Google Glass (being demonstrated under the aegis of ALA’s Office for Information Technology Policy) created buzz. Via Twitter, librarians reacted to the wearable computing device in ways that ran the gamut from enthusiasm to criticism of the functionality to concerns about patron privacy.

Click here for the full report.

    Snow and cold presented transportation challenges in getting to Philadelphia for the American Library Association (ALA)’s 2014 Midwinter conference, leading some exhibitors to express disappointment in the light crowds on the exhibit floor, though ALA reports attendance of 12,207. This total tops those for recent Midwinters in San Diego, Dallas, and Seattle’s, but the growth came from more exhibitors themselves and exhibitor-invited complimentary attendees. Those hardy, or lucky, librarians that did make it got some good leads and found excitement in a number of places. Besides grabbing the many galleys on offer and lining up for signings, the presence of Google Glass (being demonstrated under the aegis of ALA’s Office for Information Technology Policy) created buzz. Via Twitter, librarians reacted to the wearable computing device in ways that ran the gamut from enthusiasm to criticism of the functionality to concerns about patron privacy.

    Click here for the full report.

  2. thepinakes:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Tumblarians at ALAMW14! SEE YOU THERE.
(PS-The Trestle Inn is conveniently located only a few short blocks from the EveryLibrary After Hours Party)
(PPS-Invite design courtesy of Molly Queen of GIFs)


Night gathers, and now my watch begins. It shall not end until the EveryLibrary Afterhours Party. I pledge my life and honor to the Tumblarians, for this night and all the nights to come.

    thepinakes:

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    Tumblarians at ALAMW14! SEE YOU THERE.

    (PS-The Trestle Inn is conveniently located only a few short blocks from the EveryLibrary After Hours Party)

    (PPS-Invite design courtesy of Molly Queen of GIFs)

    Night gathers, and now my watch begins. It shall not end until the EveryLibrary Afterhours Party. I pledge my life and honor to the Tumblarians, for this night and all the nights to come.

  3. thelifeguardlibrarian:

oupacademic:

Tumblarians, are you attending ALA Midwinter? Drop by our booth (#1607), 3-4pm on Saturday, January 25, for a special catered presentation of the Grove Dictionary of American Music, Second Edition given by OUP AmeriGrove editor Anna-Lise Santella. Come by any time to pick up a free Oxford tote bag and find out more about what we’re doing at ALAMW.

Yes please!

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    oupacademic:

    Tumblarians, are you attending ALA Midwinter? Drop by our booth (#1607), 3-4pm on Saturday, January 25, for a special catered presentation of the Grove Dictionary of American Music, Second Edition given by OUP AmeriGrove editor Anna-Lise Santella. Come by any time to pick up a free Oxford tote bag and find out more about what we’re doing at ALAMW.

    Yes please!

  4. Galley Guide Discoveries: 12 Spring Books You Shouldn’t Miss →

    If Library Journal’s galley guides serve to bring good books to your attention, they also serve to bring good books to mine. Here are 12 books I discovered while compiling the ALA Midwinter guide. Some, like Emma Straub’s The Vacationers, Walter Kirn’s Blood Will Out, and Michael Winter’s Minister Without Portfolio, are real surprises I’m chagrined not to have encountered; others, like Hassan Blasim’s The Corpse Exhibition, Kyung-sook Shin’s I’ll Be Right There, and Kenan Trebincevic’s The Bosnia List, are books I’m excited about but found too late to feature in Prepub Alert, so I’m grateful for this second chance. Take a look at them all.

    Going to ALA Midwinter? Be sure to grab ARCs of these titles. And you can sign up for Prepub Alert editor Barbara Hoffert’s Galley Guide here.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  5. oneofthethousand:

librarykazoo:

katemacetak:

ala-con:


Show off your Midwinter tattoos
Are you getting tattooed at Philadelphia Eddie’s Chinatown Tattoo during your Midwinter trip? They are offering a librarian’s discount of $10 off tattoos costing $60–$100 and $20 off tattoos $100 and up (bring your badge). If you add new ink to your body (especially of the literary or book-inspired variety) at the famous tattoo shop located near the Pennsylvania Convention Center and share it on social media, don’t forget to add both the ALA Midwinter hashtag (#alamw14) and the tattoo hashtag (#LibInk) to your picture and show it off to the Midwinter masses!

Philadelphia Eddie’s Chinatown Tattoo
pechinatown@gmail.com
215-440-9997
904 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

I want to print this out and hand it to people who think that librarians are all old ladies with buns.

Hmmmm! Seriously considering…….

Huh. Well, I’d love the discount (and even have a tattoo in mind) but since I’m not going to Midwinter, it wouldn’t save me much. Oh well.

Speaking of librarian tattoos. If you don’t have one now, you can get inked at Midwinter.

    oneofthethousand:

    librarykazoo:

    katemacetak:

    ala-con:

    Show off your Midwinter tattoos

    Are you getting tattooed at Philadelphia Eddie’s Chinatown Tattoo during your Midwinter trip? They are offering a librarian’s discount of $10 off tattoos costing $60–$100 and $20 off tattoos $100 and up (bring your badge). If you add new ink to your body (especially of the literary or book-inspired variety) at the famous tattoo shop located near the Pennsylvania Convention Center and share it on social media, don’t forget to add both the ALA Midwinter hashtag (#alamw14) and the tattoo hashtag (#LibInk) to your picture and show it off to the Midwinter masses!

    Philadelphia Eddie’s Chinatown Tattoo

    215-440-9997

    904 Arch Street

    Philadelphia, PA 19107

    I want to print this out and hand it to people who think that librarians are all old ladies with buns.

    Hmmmm! Seriously considering…….

    Huh. Well, I’d love the discount (and even have a tattoo in mind) but since I’m not going to Midwinter, it wouldn’t save me much. Oh well.

    Speaking of librarian tattoos. If you don’t have one now, you can get inked at Midwinter.

  6. As I always hope to do at conferences, at ALA Midwinter in Seattle I tried to connect with the young librarians once again. They were there, in much greater numbers than I expected. Better yet, they were partying their way to the revolution, with all the gusto and energy I remember from long ago. Not only that, they were debating the issues, discussing what was right and wrong with ALA, and sharing what they thought would strengthen libraries and guarantee their survival. It was a timely rebel spring, and it was inspiring.

    — A Rebel Spring | Blatant Berry, Library Journal, in which John Berry, LJ Editor-at-Large, says he had a good time at the Tumblarian party at ALA Midwinter. JUST WAIT FOR ROUND TWO, FOLKS.

  7. Nayeri, whose A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea tells the story of twin sisters separated at age 11, one to grow up in America, the other to remain in Iran. Nayeri, who moved to Oklahoma from Iran when she was ten, said “Maybe Iranians think that I don’t have enough authority to write about Iran.” Having lived in the United States since the 1980s, she explains, “The Iran I experienced is worlds away from the Iran that exists now.” Ultimately, she says, “You write what comes to you and you do the best with it.” Stories are not anyone’s property, she maintains, concluding that “It belongs to you if you write it and you do the work.”

    — Debut Authors Discuss Authenticity and Research at ALA Midwinter

  8. Wrinkle, whose novel, Wash, follows Washington, a slave who worked as a “sire,” talked about how she, as a white woman, came to write a novel about an enslaved black man. “I didn’t even think about anyone reading it,” she began, but “I’ve been challenged by the question, ‘Why do you have the right to talk about this story?’” It’s a question she’s sought to answer through her own family history: Wrinkle is a descendant of slave-owners, and one of her own ancestors was rumored to sell the services of his male slaves as sires. “Having slave-holding ancestors means that it’s my story too,” Wrinkle said. “This is something that needs to be written about.”

    — Debut Authors Discuss Authenticity and Research at ALA Midwinter

  9. Douglas Lord keeps making me laugh really loud in my cubicle.

    Douglas Lord keeps making me laugh really loud in my cubicle.

  10. 
The big news in reference was that the Dictionary of American Regional English, edited by Frederick Cassidy and Joan Houston Hall and published by Belknap/Harvard Univ. Press, won the Dartmouth Medal. The Dartmouth is RUSA’s (ALA’s reference and user services division) top honor, but as part of it’s user-services beat, RUSA also recognizes many other works; see the entire list at Wyatt’s World.
Reference publishers had many new products and announcements at the show, which ranged from the unveiling of massive efforts that took years to produce, down to innovative marketing efforts surrounding existing materials.

Reference News from the Show | ALA Midwinter 2013

    The big news in reference was that the Dictionary of American Regional English, edited by Frederick Cassidy and Joan Houston Hall and published by Belknap/Harvard Univ. Press, won the Dartmouth Medal. The Dartmouth is RUSA’s (ALA’s reference and user services division) top honor, but as part of it’s user-services beat, RUSA also recognizes many other works; see the entire list at Wyatt’s World.

    Reference publishers had many new products and announcements at the show, which ranged from the unveiling of massive efforts that took years to produce, down to innovative marketing efforts surrounding existing materials.

    Reference News from the Show | ALA Midwinter 2013

  11. 
ALA Midwinter Rundown: Ebooks, Dues, and Library/Vendor Relations



The buzz around the conference was a natural evolution of the preoccupations that have dominated librarianship recently, with no major new issues coming out of left field: the disruptive and transformative potential of new technologies continued to dominate the conversation, from ebooks to maker spaces (an incredibly well-attended track on Monday).
The technology theme continued at LJ’s own events, both held at Seattle’s Metropolitan Grill. The Librarian of the Year dinner, honoring Jo Budler, state librarian of Kansas, featured many testimonials by attendees to her groundbreaking work on ebook ownership for libraries (along with her straightforward demeanor and profusion of pets). And Lilia Pavlovsky, honored at the reception for the LJ Teaching Award 2012, is renowned for both teaching effective use of cutting edge technology, and using new technologies to teach.
Likewise, meeting efforts were devoted to wrestling with stubborn evergreen conundrums of the field, like how best to serve homeless patrons — something the Intellectual Freedom Committee declined to enshrine in the Library Bill of Rights this conference — and raise enough money to address ongoing needs, let alone expand the library mandate through new initiatives like ALA’s The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities, a partnership with the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, kicked off at Midwinter by ALA President Maureen Sullivan via a press conference and series of related conversations.

    The buzz around the conference was a natural evolution of the preoccupations that have dominated librarianship recently, with no major new issues coming out of left field: the disruptive and transformative potential of new technologies continued to dominate the conversation, from ebooks to maker spaces (an incredibly well-attended track on Monday).

    The technology theme continued at LJ’s own events, both held at Seattle’s Metropolitan Grill. The Librarian of the Year dinner, honoring Jo Budler, state librarian of Kansas, featured many testimonials by attendees to her groundbreaking work on ebook ownership for libraries (along with her straightforward demeanor and profusion of pets). And Lilia Pavlovsky, honored at the reception for the LJ Teaching Award 2012, is renowned for both teaching effective use of cutting edge technology, and using new technologies to teach.

    Likewise, meeting efforts were devoted to wrestling with stubborn evergreen conundrums of the field, like how best to serve homeless patrons — something the Intellectual Freedom Committee declined to enshrine in the Library Bill of Rights this conference — and raise enough money to address ongoing needs, let alone expand the library mandate through new initiatives like ALA’s The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities, a partnership with the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, kicked off at Midwinter by ALA President Maureen Sullivan via a press conference and series of related conversations.

  12. I wrote up the most fun, but also the least newsworthy, session I went to at Midwinter—Library Family Feud—90 percent because I took the trouble to gif it.

    Team Librarian came back with “Things You Bring to the Beach.” The number one answer, “book,” was not their first guess, but they were able to successfully fill out the whole board, with answers like “umbrella” and “sunglasses.” I have to hand it to librarians for being a surprising bunch: “bathing suit” did not make the list at all.

    Douglas Lord, LJ's “Books for Dudes" columnist, got riled up on behalf of Team Librarian, which did not win, and left the best comment I have ever received in my career at LJ.

  13. thepinakes:

I may not be at #alamw13, but I support #sweatervestsunday from a thousand miles down the coast. The defense of intellectual freedom crosses state lines!

Daniel is repping the vest!

    thepinakes:

    I may not be at #alamw13, but I support #sweatervestsunday from a thousand miles down the coast. The defense of intellectual freedom crosses state lines!

    Daniel is repping the vest!

  14. fancylibrarian:

Pike Place Market. I love it but I have to say most of the ones I know are pretty loud.

This is a true fact.

    fancylibrarian:

    Pike Place Market. I love it but I have to say most of the ones I know are pretty loud.

    This is a true fact.

  15. ala-midwinter:

Woot! The teaser for the #SweaterVestSunday looks pretty sweet! Way to go Intellectual Freedom Fighters!!!

    ala-midwinter:

    Woot! The teaser for the #SweaterVestSunday looks pretty sweet! Way to go Intellectual Freedom Fighters!!!