1. What Governmental Big Data May Mean For Libraries | Library Journal

On May 9, President Obama signed an open data executive order and released an open data policy. Only a couple of weeks later, on May 22, Data.gov responded by launching a new  data catalog on an open source data management system called CKAN, which, the site says, will enable the central implementation of the Open Data Policy, as it will harvest the data inventories that federal agencies will be creating under the directive. “We also released new tools on Project Open Data that will help agencies easily meet the requirement of the policy, while laying the foundation for the new Data.gov infrastructure across government,” the statement continued.

Image pairing courtesy of LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro.)

    What Governmental Big Data May Mean For Libraries | Library Journal

    On May 9, President Obama signed an open data executive order and released an open data policy. Only a couple of weeks later, on May 22, Data.gov responded by launching a new  data catalog on an open source data management system called CKAN, which, the site says, will enable the central implementation of the Open Data Policy, as it will harvest the data inventories that federal agencies will be creating under the directive. “We also released new tools on Project Open Data that will help agencies easily meet the requirement of the policy, while laying the foundation for the new Data.gov infrastructure across government,” the statement continued.

    Image pairing courtesy of LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro.)

    (Source: Flickr / jdhancock)

  2. alexeidarling:

    The biggest question I have is “Did that Bionic Bunnybook predate Arthur as a show?”

    It is officially LeVar Burton day over here at the LJ tumblr.

  3. schoollibraryjournal:

    SLJ’s Karyn Peterson chatted with LeVar Burton about Reading Rainbow’s new initiatives.

    Stay tuned for the article!

    Swoon. Seriously. I don’t think I could handle meeting LeVar. I tried to explain this to some of my coworkers yesterday and ended up describing for like five minutes the scene in Star Trek: Insurrection where Geordi sees a sunset for the first time. So, basically:

    image

  4. Strand Books: Book Briefs: Make It So: Leadership Lessons from Star Trek: The Next Generation* →

    strandbooks:

    From the author of Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun comes another Star Trek-themed business book, this time from the perspective of Captain Picard. Yes.

    • When you are asked for approval of an action, you should find every reason to respond with, “Permission granted.” Make it so.
    • In space, it is rarely better to act quickly and err than to tarry until the time of action has past, as the time of action for any one thing is rarely absolute and many errors are fatal.
    • It is impossible to master any art or science at once. Instead, to excel at anything one must patiently wrestle with it until it gives up its secret.
    PS The Amazon reviews are totally worth checking out.

    Mark Brown writes: “I bought this book based on how much I love Star Trek. Big mistake. It’s not at all insightfull, or true to the spirit of Star Trek. Each chapter is mostly a summary of a particular episode, written from the perspective of Captain Picard. Disapointingly, the account doesn’t sound at all like Picard, and doesn’t add anything that we didn’t see in the episode.”

    Anne Degeorge disagrees. “This book is an excellent tool for learning about being a leader even if you’re not a STAR TREK fan. I loved reading this book - every time.”

    *Whoa. Colon overload. Amazon actually lists it with three. Terrible.

    This book exists.