1. the pinakes: Among scientists, however, just over half rated the gateway and... →

    Among scientists, however, just over half rated the gateway and archival role as very important, and even smaller shares rated other roles as very important. Over a quarter of scientists agreed strongly “because faculty have easy access to academic content online, the role librarians play at this institution is becoming much less important” (compared to about 20 percent overall).

    Ithaka Survey: Humanities Faculty Love the Library; Scientists Less Enthusiastic | Meredith Schwartz, Library Journal

    But some researchers are now raising the alarm about what they see as the proliferation of online journals that will print seemingly anything for a fee. They warn that nonexperts doing online research will have trouble distinguishing credible research from junk. “Most people don’t know the journal universe,” Dr. Goodman said. “They will not know from a journal’s title if it is for real or not.” 

    For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia | Gina Kolata, New York Times

    These two quotes, posted consecutively by the Infoneer Pulse, raise my hackles: on one hand, science faculty are increasingly dismissive of librarians due to the fact they can get content so easily online*, while simultaneously, scientists are becoming increasingly flummoxed and confused by the preponderance of predatory online journals. You know who’s good at sniffing out predatory journals? Librarians. Maybe the science faculty cited in the first quote ought to check with their librarians in order to avoid becoming entangled with fake journals, as described in the second.

    Personally, I feel very fortunate that I’ve been able to forge strong working relationships with my science faculty, but I benefit from working at a small university where I get to know them all by name.

    *This seems to neglect that they can often get that content so easily online because of their library’s budget and the time of the librarians who fine-tune the link resolvers.

  2. gov-info:

    Smithsonian Gov Doc

    The works featured in Natural Histories span from the 16th century to the early 20th century, with scientific disciplines ranging from anthropology to astronomy to zoology. The edition is packaged with 40 extraordinary, suitable-for-framing prints representing each essay.

    “In the days before photography and printing, original art was the only way to capture the likeness of organisms, people, and places, and therefore the only way to share this information with others,” said Tom Baione, the Harold Boeschenstein Director of Library Services at the Museum. “Printed reproductions of natural history art enabled many who’d never seen an elephant, for instance, to try to begin to understand what an elephant looked like and how its unusual features might function.”

    Watch this video interview with Library Director Tom Baione, below, and for more information see the full press release.

    (via New Book Highlights Rare Scientific Works)

    For more images check out http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/11/27/natural-histories/

    I loved finding this book on my shelves last fall. Check out our review of the book!

  3. chicagopubliclibrary:


“Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.”

Happy birthday, Bill Nye! Born November 27th, 1955.
The Chicago Public Library has a large selection of Bill Nye books. Click here to check out the list.

This is just great life advice. Happy birthday, good sir!

    chicagopubliclibrary:

    “Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.”

    Happy birthday, Bill Nye! Born November 27th, 1955.

    The Chicago Public Library has a large selection of Bill Nye books. Click here to check out the list.

    This is just great life advice. Happy birthday, good sir!

  4. Book smell science:

    Chemists at University College, London have investigated the old book odor and concluded that old books release hundreds of volatile organic compounds into the air from the paper. The lead scientist described the smell as “A combination of grassy notes with a tang of acids and a hint of vanilla over an underlying mustiness.”

  5. From LJ’s The Digital Shift, Royal Society, Scientific American Make Historical Archives Available Online:

    The Royal Society historical journal archive became permanently available as of October 26, and the Scientific American archive back to 1845 (volume 1, issue 1) became available starting today on nature.com

    The Royal Society collection offers about 60,000 historical scientific papers which are now accessible via a fully searchable online archive, with papers published more than 70 years ago freely available.

    Items in the archive include Isaac Newton’s first published scientific papergeological work by a young Charles Darwin, and Benjamin Franklin’s account of his electrical kite experiment.

    The Scientific American collection includes original reports of Alexander Graham Bell’s invention of the telephone, Thomas Edison’s invention of the light bulb, and coverage of New York City’s first subway. Access to the 1845-1909 archive (about 75,000 articles) will be free until the end of November, after which site license access can be purchased.