1. Introducing SLJ Reviews Sneak Peek: A First Look at Hot Titles →

    Can’t wait for your print issue of School Library Journal? Now you can get a monthly sneak peak at print reviews of  buzz-worthy titles.

  2. therumpus:

School Library Journal has a kickass new Diversity Issue—the second in their history. The stories are just about as relevant as you can get:
Children’s Books. Still an All-White World?
The Publishing Perspective
Everyday Diversity: A Teacher Librarian Offers Practical Tips to Make a Difference
Culturally Diverse Books Selected by SLJ’s Review Editors
The Multiracial Population Is Growing, But Kid Lit Isn’t Keeping Up
SisOps: Girl-friendly technology initiatives challenge a boys-only culture
LGBTQ & You: How to Support Your Students




Our SLJ colleagues did an awesome job!

    therumpus:

    School Library Journal has a kickass new Diversity Issue—the second in their history. The stories are just about as relevant as you can get:

    Our SLJ colleagues did an awesome job!

  3. Wanted: Presentations for LJ/SLJ October 1 Virtual Event “The Digital Shift” →

    Library Journal and School Library Journal are looking for a few good presentations to enhance our annual virtual program “The Digital Shift” on October 1, 2014. This year’s theme: “Libraries @ the Center.” If you have a compelling story to share about innovation in libraries—from new takes on curation, workforce development, and content creation, to great examples of collaboration and programs that enhance learning—we’d like to hear from you.

    But you’d better hurry, proposals are due by May 2.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  4. schoollibraryjournal:

(via How to Kill a School Library: 10 Easy Steps | School Library Journal)
Step One: Fire your librarians. If you really want to get rid of library programs and services, start at the top. Ship them off to traditional classrooms or Timbuktu—just get rid of them. Some are rabbler-rousers and troublemakers, and others just won’t get off their soapbox about all the great things libraries can do for kids. Once they’re out of the picture, it’ll be easier to do what you want with the library.

    schoollibraryjournal:

    (via How to Kill a School Library: 10 Easy Steps | School Library Journal)

    Step One: Fire your librarians. If you really want to get rid of library programs and services, start at the top. Ship them off to traditional classrooms or Timbuktu—just get rid of them. Some are rabbler-rousers and troublemakers, and others just won’t get off their soapbox about all the great things libraries can do for kids. Once they’re out of the picture, it’ll be easier to do what you want with the library.

  5. schoollibraryjournal:

29,794 followers on Twitter. 30,000 and we get cake. Just saying.

Hope my SLJ colleagues will save a piece for me!

    schoollibraryjournal:

    29,794 followers on Twitter. 30,000 and we get cake. Just saying.

    Hope my SLJ colleagues will save a piece for me!

  6. As the job landscape continues to shift, the mission of schools and libraries to address the gap intensifies, and the work of the key players, teachers and librarians, has never been more essential. Of course, they need support with infrastructure—like that provided by the recently reformed E-rate program—to level the playing field. And, as critically, we need enough teachers and librarians to go around, so we don’t keep exacerbating the other gaps with what’s been called an attention gap as class sizes grow and librarians get stretched thin. Our kids need all the engaged grown-ups they can get in their lives.

    — Rebecca T. Miller, “Matters of Equity: As the Divide Grows, We Must Help Level the Playing Field for All of Our Kids” (via schoollibraryjournal)

  7. Today, I participated in the online School Library Journal SummerTeen event, which I would describe as an outstanding, informative, dynamic, interactive event with live web broadcasts, panel discussions, chats with authors, publishers, a film director & fellow YA enthusiasts-teachers, librarians, writers. Besides the online site through SLJ, we used the hashtag #SLJST to connect with others. It was a productive time and I found myself glued to the computer and actively participating and listening. It took me over an hour to prepare the omelet I made for lunch because I kept turning back to my computer.

    — Liza Wiemer, “Highlights from the School Library Journal #TeenSummer Online Event #SLJST (via schoollibraryjournal)

  8. schoollibraryjournal:

    School Library Journal’s Shelley Diaz has compiled a list of grants for libraries seeking new ways to finance early learning initiatives, big and small.

    Check it out here!

    The best.

  9. Murderous Monologs, Dying Suns, and a Library Deluge | What We’re Reading

    This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffers are getting cozy with  tales of murder and with children’s literature. SLJ's Shelley Diaz and Chelsey Philpot are both reading Bennett Madison's September Girls (HarperCollins) and I’m listening to an audiobook full of crunchy, creaky words: armiger, chiliarch, cacogen, exultant, optimate, destrier, undine. If you see me murmuring to myself on the subway, it’s Gene Wolfe’s words, not a sign of my deteriorating sanity. (I promise.)

  10. schoollibraryjournal:

    Where I Work: Elizabeth Wein

    The pictures included here are spontaneous and random because, like Mr Earbrass in Edward Gorey’s The Unstrung Harp, I belong “to the straying, rather than the sedentary type of author.” I am “never to be found at [my] desk unless actually writing down a sentence.”

    The summer house (in our back garden) has been dubbed by one of my readers “Tiny Little House O’ Writing.” It is a miniature imitation of the summer cottage in Pennsylvania where I spent all my summers as a child and where my grandmother now lives. It is also the space we have instead of a porch, because they don’t do porches in Scotland (the average summer temperature is 61 F / 16 C). The summer house has got a heater and electricity installed. It is called a “summer house” because you can sit in it and pretend it is summer.

    The cat’s name is Hershi. He is always by my side when I am working at home, on the table watching me, or under the table next to my feet, or sleeping on a chair close by.

    The dining room table is where I write when it is too cold to sit in the summer house, which is most of the year, even with the heater installed. I do have a desk, but I haven’t actually sat there to write since 2009. I use the desk as an extension of my many filing cabinets.

    In the morning, when the sun is coming in, I like to write in the bay window in the living room. The front garden is big and a little overgrown and makes me feel like I am in the woods, even though our house is on the main road into Perth. There is a beech hedge, a rhododendron hedge, and three linden trees hiding the road from our house. I confess that when I am sitting in the bay window, I like to pretend it is a turret in a castle (I think I have St. Michael’s Mount, in Cornwall, in mind).

    If it is warm enough and not raining, which is about two weeks in the year, I sometimes sit in the tiny garden at the side of our house. There are lilacs and apple trees and a rain barrel there. It feels like a country cottage garden even though it isn’t.  I think that what most of my favorite writing places have in common is that they fool me into thinking I am somewhere else. I don’t know what that says about my writing.

    The other thing they have in common is that they are very photogenic. At least once a week I go sit with a friend in the Winter Garden at the Crieff Hydro (actually at the table in the picture in the link: http://www.crieffhydro.com/leisure/food-and-drink/the-winter-garden.aspx ); we write there together for about four hours at a time. I like to vary my hangouts.

    Elizabeth Wein is the award-winning author of Code Name Verity (2012). Her new novel, Rose Under Fire (both Disney-Hyperion, 2013), will be released in the United States in September.

  11. schoollibraryjournal:

    Where I Work: Julie Berry

    I have a little office in my home. It’s an upstairs room overlooking the street, too small for a bedroom (no closet) but just right for a writing office. Behind my chair, three south-facing windows feed me lots of pretty light, even on gray days. Big blossoming plants grow in the bay windows. Green plants nourish the soul, I find.

    Here’s my desk. More plants, some artwork (woodcuts by my sister, a landscape by a friend), research books, office supplies, binder clips (use lots of those), and a bulletin board full of kid pictures, quotes, poem snippets, and miscellany. Notice the strip of purplish color on the wall under the bulletin board—I started painting my office but never finished. The color name felt writerly: “Foreshadow.”

    Here’s a closer look at my desk setup. I plug my laptop into a larger monitor and use a dual-monitor setting, so I can spread my manuscript wide on the big screen, and keep my email visible on the lower monitor. Wider screens with multi-page views are essential for chapter revision—they help me spot redundancy, wordiness, and draggy spots. Sometimes I travel to college libraries where I can access huge monitors for a 4 or 6-page view when I need to see my work panoramically.

    Here’s a closer look at one corner of my desk. Offices can be dusty, boxy, techno-dreary places, a far cry from the fictional worlds writers hope to create. Color, plants, art, friends—I try to keep them close. Couldn’t get them to pose, but my cats insert themselves here constantly. This woodcut (also by my sister Beth) is Saint Augustine. I like having a saint watch over my notebooks.

    Julie Berry is the author of All the Truth That’s in Me, 2013, Viking. Find her online at www.julieberrybooks.com, or on Twitter at @julieberrybooks.

  12. I urge ALA leadership to step out of the comfort zone as it did on ebooks and advocate with education leaders they don’t normally talk to—district leaders, principals, superintendents, and departments of education—to correct the misperception that school librarians are expendable. Tap incoming president Barbara Stripling’s deep passion and knowledge to tip the scales. She managed one of the most complex school library systems in the United States, New York City’s, during a time of tremendous change, and she is past president of AASL. Stripling is uniquely positioned to tell this story in a compelling way.

    — Rebecca T. Miller, “ALA, It’s Time to Step Up for School Libraries” (via schoollibraryjournal)

  13. Toxic stress is the heavy hand of early poverty, scripting a child’s life not in the Horatio Alger scenario of determination and drive, but in the patterns of disappointment and deprivation that shape a life of limitations.

    — 

    Poverty as a Childhood Disease, by Perri Klass.

    As we saw at this year’s schoollibraryjournal Public Library Leadership Think Tank, school and public libraries have a very strong role to play in mitigating the effects of poverty, for both children and their caregivers. 

    (via librarylinknj)

  14. schoollibraryjournal:

“Tut, tut, it looks like rain” ― A.A. Milne
It’s a silver day at the SLJ office in Manhattan.

GPOLJ.

    schoollibraryjournal:

    “Tut, tut, it looks like rain” ― A.A. Milne

    It’s a silver day at the SLJ office in Manhattan.

    GPOLJ.

  15. sdiaz101:

Share with School Library Journal why you love what you do.  #lovemylibraryjob

    sdiaz101:

    Share with School Library Journal why you love what you do.  #lovemylibraryjob