1. 
Most Popular Streaming Downloads
Looking at some of the sites’ most in-demand offerings gives a sense of the range of content available to patrons.
Freegal Beyoncé concert videos; Chinatown; Stardust; Where Angels Fear To Tread; High Noon
hooplaLEGO: The Adventures of Clutch Powers; Twelve Years a Slave: Solomon Northrup’s Odyssey; To Kill a Mockingbird; Babe; 2 Fast 2 Furious
OverDrivePortlandia; Busy World of Richard Scarry; Nosferatu; The Rage in Placid Lake;Richard Simmons workout videos
IndieFlixBit Players; Living on One Dollar; Bargain; Weightless; Exhibit A

    Most Popular Streaming Downloads

    Looking at some of the sites’ most in-demand offerings gives a sense of the range of content available to patrons.

    Freegal
    Beyoncé concert videos; Chinatown; Stardust; Where Angels Fear To Tread; High Noon

    hoopla
    LEGO: The Adventures of Clutch Powers; Twelve Years a Slave: Solomon Northrup’s Odyssey; To Kill a Mockingbird; Babe; 2 Fast 2 Furious

    OverDrive
    Portlandia; Busy World of Richard Scarry; Nosferatu; The Rage in Placid Lake;Richard Simmons workout videos

    IndieFlix
    Bit Players; Living on One Dollar; Bargain; Weightless; Exhibit A

    (Source: reviews.libraryjournal.com)

  2. OverDrive announces move to all MP3 audiobooks →

    OverDrive, one of the major vendors of audiobooks to libraries, has announced that it will be moving away from the WMA format and making audiobooks for the library market available solely as MP3s

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  3. Six Libraries Exceed a Million Digital Checkouts This Year: OverDrive - GalleyCat →

    The libraries to make OverDrive’s ”Million Digital Checkouts Club” this year include: King County Library System in Washington, which recorded 1.6 million downloads up 25% over 2012;Toronto Public Library, which had 1.5 million digital downloads this year, up 68% over last year; New York Public Library which had 1.2 million digital downloads up 16% from 2012;  Hennepin County Library in Minnesota had 1 million digital downloads in 2013, a 41% increase from 2012; Cleveland Public Library in Ohio, which marked 1 million digital downloads this year,  a 32% increase over 2012; and the  Seattle Public Library which had a million downloads, representing a 22% increase over 2012.

  4. More Than 17,000 Penguin Titles (New & Backlist) Now Available to OverDrive’s U.S. Library Partners →

    image

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  5. “…OverDrive is not the big bad wolf.

    But the crunch for OverDrive comes around questions of privacy and data ownership.

    It’s unlikely the company is just going to calmly set aside its competitive advantages, including driving business to its own interface. Upon such traffic relies the tremendous load of data that OverDrive is planning to start leveraging in a significant way, which Potash said will help public libraries better understand not only how their patrons act but also better depict how libraries affect the publishing business.

    Still, the big fundamental question will be a now familiar one: Who owns the data? Libraries think they do but will that matter in an increasingly competitive landscape where data is very valuable? OverDrive has said numerous times that it does not gather personally identifiable data from users, but, ultimately, what contract terms will govern use of this data, particularly by third parties to which libraries may want to grant access?

    Similarly, only a minority of librarians seem to care deeply that the Kindle loans are in the end an Amazon transaction, but they should, as Tom Galante, director and CEO of New York’s Queens Library, pointed out during the Seattle meeting. Data from library transactions is informing Amazon’s sales strategy, and that’s questionable at best.

    But Potash had the moxie to get a deal done with Amazon and to accumulate all this data; give the man his due. If librarians don’t like it, it’s up to them to act.”

    — 

    OverDrive & Big (Private) Data - Library Journal editorial by Michael Kelley

    I do not disagree with Kelley’s points - OverDrive has worked hard on accommodating demands from librarians (and thus from patrons) while still being a competitive vendor. Now they are one of many, but still have the Kindle ebooks tipping in their favor - while the Amazon collaboration leaves a bad taste in many mouths.

    Patrons want what they want - they don’t want government in their (reading) business, but they want the digital services that are controlled by one big entity. For most, they already handed over their reading habits as soon as they connected their Kindle to their Amazon account.

    Where is the line for librarians supporting readers’ privacy, but readers demand services that gives their data to vendors? What side should we stand on?

    (via booksyarnink)

  6. Under the agency model, and working with multiple distributors, Macmillan will offer over 1,200 backlist eBooks from its Minotaur Books mystery and crime fiction imprint, a part of the St. Martins Publishing Group. The titles cover all sub-categories of crime fiction from thrillers to cozies, hard-boiled crime to psychological suspense and include many award winners.

    — Macmillan’s press release about its nonexclusive library ebook pilot. I thought it made sense to remind Cloud librarians about the content since the model (“2 years or 52 lends, whichever comes first”) got more play in the media. As much as I want to create a monster book jacket showcase of what’s available, you’ll have to wait until Friday, March 1, at the earliest. I will offer this hint: M.C. Beaton. (via cloudunbound)

  7. The 3M Content Acquisition Tool (CAT) (launching in April) now provides featured book lists created by Heather McCormack (Former LJ Book Review Editor). Imagine “if you liked The Hunger Games, try these.” The CAT now offers a save search feature, multiple shopping carts, improved searching capabilities, and eISBN searching as well.

    — 

    Sue Polanka (the fine mind behind the must-read librarian tech blog No Shelf Required) in her 2013 Midwinter ALA update about ebook vendors, including 3M. 

    This spring, I’m going to talk at length with Polanka about our super-powered, hyper-intuitive new selection tool, dubbed CAT. It will launch in April, and if you were able to attend Midwinter in Seattle, you likely saw a demo and jumped with glee (“Finally, a piece of library tech that helps, not hinders me!”). If you missed the show, no worries; we are offering web demos.

    Ping me if you want a sneak peek of a tool that will make all of our lives easier.

    (via cloudunbound)

    FYI!

  8. We decided that a daily campaign that spotlights a different eBook every day would effectively grab patrons’ attention and provide much –needed readers’ advisory; we dubbed our campaign, “eBook of the Day.”

    — A great post from Tumblrarian gobstacked on the Overdrive website!

  9. Penguin’s decision to terminate its contract with OverDrive has further fractured the library ebook lending market, disturbed the American Library Association, and highlighted the difficulty in finding a single business model that all parties can be comfortable with.

    And the executive director of The Authors Guild says that it is “awful” that public libraries are being put in the middle of a conflict that has embroiled the large commercial entities of Penguin, Amazon, and OverDrive.

    — From LJ’s Digital Shift, an update on Penguin’s move to pull it’s ebooks out of libraries.

  10. Penguin Group Terminating Its Contract with OverDrive →

    In a stunning development, Penguin Group has extricated itself from its contract with OverDrive, the primary supplier of ebooks to public libraries.

    Starting February 10, Penguin, which had recently instituted limitations on library lending for ebooks and audiobooks, will now no longer offer any ebooks or audiobooks through OverDrive.

    “Looking ahead, we are continuing to talk about our future plans for ebook and digital audiobook availability for library lending with a number of partners providing these services,” said Erica Glass, in a prepared statement.

  11. After an “upbeat and productive” meeting with leaders of the American Library Association on Tuesday, Random House reaffirmed its commitment to library lending of the company’s entire portfolio of ebook titles.

    At the same time, the company has announced that effective March 1 it is raising ebook prices that it charges library wholesalers such as OverDrive, 3M, and Ingram, which set the ultimate price libraries will pay to lease ebooks.

    — From LJ’s Digital Shift, Random House Reaffirms Commitment to Library Ebook Lending While Raising Prices to Wholesalers.

  12. OverDrive expands public library catalogs →

    “We’re allowing libraries to be better connected with their communities,” OverDrive CEO Steve Potash said during a recent interview. “Right now, we have librarians who are trying to add books to the e-catalog but don’t always know what to add. Now, by exposing a publisher’s entire list, it becomes like crowdsourcing, where patrons can offer their suggestions.”

    Potash said he expects the program to begin within a couple of weeks, in a handful of library systems, including New York City, Boston and Cuyahoga County in Ohio.

  13. appsandstacks:

Most Downloaded Books from U.S. Libraries, as of January 1, 2012 - OverDrive
Includes ebooks as well as audiobooks, adult & juvenile fiction & non-fiction.

    appsandstacks:

    Most Downloaded Books from U.S. Libraries, as of January 1, 2012 - OverDrive

    Includes ebooks as well as audiobooks, adult & juvenile fiction & non-fiction.

  14. OverDrive, Amazon Privacy Disclaimer Pops Up in Wisconsin; in Virginia, Questions About Catalog Disparities

    From the Digital Shift

    The Wisconsin Public Library Consortium (WPLC) posted a notice on its website on Wednesday announcing that OverDrive had added a disclaimer to the consortium’s site which warns a patron downloading a Kindle book “that they are leaving the library’s digital site AND that the commercial site (aka Amazon) doesn’t have the same privacy policies as the library.” According to Jane Richard, a manager at the consortium, the wording for this pop-up window was settled on by OverDrive and Amazon.  The text reads:

    Attention Kindle Book User:
    By clicking “Accept to Continue” you consent to being linked away from the library’s download platform to a commercial service. This third party service does not have the same policies used by the library for your session privacy or use of your user information. If you continue, you are advised to consult the commercial website’s privacy policy for additional information. Click “Accept to Continue”

  15. The ebooks being borrowed by Amazon customers aren’t the same ePUB files being licensed to libraries via Overdrive, they’re Amazon’s files that they’re allowing their customers to access via a marketing partnership with local libraries.

    Basically, Amazon one-upped Barnes & Noble’s Read In-Store feature that allows Nook customers to “read NOOK Books FREE for up to one hour per day” in any of their 700+ stores, and put the exact same feature in every Kindle customer’s living room via 11,000+ public libraries, without the physical and timing limitations. Notably, it seems they’ve also side-stepped Overdrive’s new WIN (Want It Now) Catalog that allows library patrons to purchase books (and audiobooks) directly, via links to retailers.

    As “licensing” increasingly becomes the norm for various forms of media, knowingly or not, libraries are finding themselves on the front lines of a battle that most consumers arguably don’t even realize is being fought: the question of ownership in the digital age.

    — LJ’s Guy Gonzalez, from his blog, Loud Poet