1. thepenguinpress:

The New York Times' 100 Notable Books of 2013 include: BLEEDING EDGE (Thomas Pynchon), AFTER THE MUSIC STOPPED (Alan Blinder), COMMAND AND CONTROL (Eric Schlosser), THE THIRD COAST (Thomas Dyja), WILD ONES (Jon Mooallem), and YEAR ZERO (Ian Burama)!

Tumblarians, whadyathink?

    thepenguinpress:

    The New York Times' 100 Notable Books of 2013 include: BLEEDING EDGE (Thomas Pynchon), AFTER THE MUSIC STOPPED (Alan Blinder), COMMAND AND CONTROL (Eric Schlosser), THE THIRD COAST (Thomas Dyja), WILD ONES (Jon Mooallem), and YEAR ZERO (Ian Burama)!

    Tumblarians, whadyathink?

  2. I also would like to say: You really should have kids review the children’s books (especially reviewers who are the same age as the kids whom the book is intended for).

    — Second grader Rosa Cohn in a letter to the New York Times (via schoollibraryjournal)

  3. Was It “Write An Article About Libraries” Week?

    By 

    Maybe it was just a slow news week between Christmas and New Year’s, causing editors to pull out the evergreen (pardon the pun) articles. But this past week has been a big one for thinky pieces about the future of libraries in the mainstream media. There’s nothing much new here for the plugged-in librarian, but there may be much that you’ve long been grappling with that patrons are now hearing for the first time. So if you’ve been offline for the holidays, here’s what you missed:

    The New York Times ran two, Libraries See Opening as Bookstores Close and the accompanying Room for Debate: Do We Still Need Libraries?

    (Before the title raises your blood pressure as it did mine, all the debaters agree that we do, though they call out different aspects of what libraries do and one, at least, feels that libraries shouldn’t be bearing the brunt of providing Internet access. Two of the commenters are from within the library world: Luis Herrera, city librarian of San Francisco and LJ’s 2012 Librarian of the Year, and Buffy J. Hamilton, newly appointed learning strategist for the Cleveland Public Library and LJ 2011 Mover & Shaker.)

    John Palfrey, head of school at Philips Andover Academy, explains why this question is up for debate at all, and suggests how to make the case for libraries most effectively to those who are asking the question.

    Meanwhile, NPR weighed in on the perennial ebooks for libraries quagmire with Libraries And E-Lending: The ‘Wild West’ Of Digital Licensing?, including an interview with former Library Journal and School Library Journal editorial director, Brian Kenney. And in case your holidays started as early as Hannukah this year, on December 11, Forbes visited the same subject with The Wrong War Over eBooks: Publishers Vs. Libraries, positing that pay-per-circ could be just the compromise model publishers and libraries have been searching for.

    The Washington Post eschewed controversy and stuck to human interest with a piece on reading to therapy dogs.

  4. Introductory chapter books aimed at second, third and fourth grade readers overwhelmingly reflect a suburban milieu with white protagonists. Students of other races and ethnicities seldom encounter characters like themselves in books, and some education experts say that can be an obstacle to literacy.

    — 

    Books to Match Diverse Young Readers - Multimedia Feature - NYTimes.com (via sdiaz101)

    Sometimes I feel like we understand each other, NYT, other times—not so much.

  5. Rejected cover art for I Did the Math: Towards a More Diverse NYT Notable Book List. (Full disclosure: I rejected it myself.)

    Rejected cover art for I Did the Math: Towards a More Diverse NYT Notable Book List. (Full disclosure: I rejected it myself.)

  6. There is so much that can be said about the good a book can do to expose readers to new places, new ways of life. (For instance, the glimpse Katherine Boo gave to American readers of Mumbai life in Behind the Beautiful Forevers.) There’s even more to be said about what a book can do for readers who have never found their own lives on the page before. (How many books tell the kind of story Jessamyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones does?) It’s the job of book review editors—as guides to the overwhelming volume of titles published every year—to draw readers’ attention to the kind of books that can broaden their world, that tell the kind of stories that have never been told in print before. These books are out there, we just need to do a better job of finding and recognizing them.

    — 

    I Did the Math: Towards a More Diverse NYT Notable Book List

    I wrote about the New York Times's list of 100 Notable Books of 2012.

  7. The 10 Best Books of 2012 →

    willywaldo:

    The year’s best books, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. Two of the titles are on Library Journal’s Top Ten list. Can you guess which? You’ll have to wait until Dec. 20 to find out!

  8. theparisreview:

This weekend, seven hundred members of the Jane Austen Society of North America congregated in Brooklyn for its inaugural meeting, a discussion of sex, money, and power. Anna Quindlen delivered the keynote. Cornel West addressed suffering. And, of course, bonnets were worn. “This is a place where people can let their Jane Austen freak flag fly,” said one attendee. [New York Times]

Holy moly.

    theparisreview:

    This weekend, seven hundred members of the Jane Austen Society of North America congregated in Brooklyn for its inaugural meeting, a discussion of sex, money, and power. Anna Quindlen delivered the keynote. Cornel West addressed suffering. And, of course, bonnets were worn. “This is a place where people can let their Jane Austen freak flag fly,” said one attendee. [New York Times]

    Holy moly.

  9. Library Journal: From Wislawa Szymborska, the Nobel laureate who died this week, here’s a great poem about the essence of an onion. — Jeff Gordinier

    — 

    From last week’s NYT Diner’s Journal, “What We’re Reading.”

    The Library Journal tumblr is NYT famous.

  10. Revisiting ProQuest’s New York Times Database http://ow.ly/6BiBn

  11. F.C.C. Chairman Counsels Students to Be Moderate With Digital Media - NYTimes.com http://ow.ly/6pPZH

  12. Mass-Market Paperbacks Sales in Decline - NYTimes.com http://ow.ly/6kDbX