1. willywaldo:

    Welcome to LJ’s new neighborhood! Took a lunchtime tour and snapped photos of some notable sights from a beautiful subway mural at Fulton Street (of course) celebrating Robert Fulton’s steamboat to the magnificent Woolworth Building, one of NYC’s earliest skyscrapers, and the new Freedom Tower, or One World Trade Center.

    Despite the skyscrapers, the neighborhood has a European feel, thanks to the narrow winding streets. (This is the oldest part of the city, the site of New Amsterdam.) Very different from chic and trendy Soho, our former ‘hood.

  2. Secret Libraries of New York City →

    Tumblarians, are you coming to BEA? Be sure to check out some of Gotham’s secret libraries. I have the Hispanic Society of America on my must-see list.

  3. A Library Where the Hush Is Over Its Very Existence →

    jefflambert:

    image

    This is the entrance to the City Hall Library, open to all yet known to relatively few and visible to just about no one. “I didn’t even know this was here. Is it open to the public?” Ydanis Rodriguez, a City Council member from Manhattan, asked as he recently entered it for the first time, even though it is a short walk from his offices.

    Relative obscurity is nothing new for this institution, which is actually housed inside the Surrogate’s Court building. It is over 100 years old, but in July 1898, The New York Times wrote of its predecessor, a hodgepodge of a library inside City Hall, “There are not many who know of its existence, and few who have heard of it know of its location.” An apt description for the current library, too.

    Seems silly that a landmark designation is standing in the way of even the most basic signage. Access is a right!

    I am pro-clear signage and pro-awesome websites.

  4. chicagopubliclibrary:

    The Little Free Library Bench In New York City

    From designboom:

    The architectural league of New York has partnered with pen world voices festival and community partner two bridges neighborhood council to bring the little free library to the lower east side.

    Open and accessible to the public, the project entitled ‘word play’ by artist and architectural designer chat travieso plays with the idea of stacking and perspective. The concept uses layered plywood to allude to the vertical patterns produced by books on a bookshelf, creating multiple visual effects based on the angle one views the library.

    Located in a diverse community made up of english, spanish, and chinese speakers, this visual effect allows the book shelter to convey the word ‘library’ (printed on the surface of the piece) in these three languages all at once. In addition, the communal intervention provides two linear feet of bookshelf space;  including seating that faces the east river waterfront providing a space where people can stay to read, share with their neighbors, and enjoy the view.

    Click here to see more photos of the Little Free Library Bench!

  5. The Alternative Libraries of New York - ANIMAL by 

  6. Librarians are out there making things just a little better one person at a time in the city around you. That is our service. You sleep easier at night knowing that the cops and firefighters are on the job, don’t you feel even a little better knowing librarians are working in your community as well? Nobody is suggesting that we risk our lives in the line of duty, we don’t. We are public servants like they are though and we do interact very directly with the public just as they do. Sometimes we have even more direct and frequent contact with the public than the siren services. In our quiet, anonymous way, we set our shoulder to the wheel of their problems and issues and we leverage all the knowledge and resources we can muster for them. We care, and that is why you should care.

    — Christian Zabriskie, “Libraries in New York City: Why We Give a Damn and Why You Should Too” (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

  7. Defendants acknowledge and believe it is unfortunate that, during the course of clearing Zuccotti Park on November 15, 2011, books were damaged so as to render them unusable, and additional books are unaccounted for. Defendants further acknowledge and believe it unfortunate that certain library furnishings and equipment likewise were damaged so as to render them unusable, and other library furnishings and equipment may be unaccounted for. Plaintiffs and Defendants recognize that when a person’s property is removed from the city it is important that the City exercise due care and adhere to established procedures in order to protect legal rights of the property owners.

    — 

    City Settles Lawsuit Over The Destruction of the Occupy Wall Street Library (via mrmullin)

    BIG NEWS.

  8. queenslibrary:

Enamored with 1920s typography. Pictured: One of the 5,000 maps we have in our Archives, covering the years 1639 to the present.

    queenslibrary:

    Enamored with 1920s typography. Pictured: One of the 5,000 maps we have in our Archives, covering the years 1639 to the present.

  9. The public library was a vital part of my childhood. Each weekend, it was the temple I attended.

    — Author Diana M. Raab shares her memories of libraries, including those of Queens Library at Fresh Meadows (via queenslibrary)

  10. …in the new realities of today’s knowledge economy…it is difficult to achieve economic success or enjoy a decent quality of life without a range of basic literacy, language and technological skills. A distressingly large segment of the city’s population lacks these basic building blocks, but the public library has stepped in, becoming the second chance human capital institution. No other institution, public or private, does a better job of reaching people who have been left behind in today’s economy, have failed to reach their potential in the city’s public school system or who simply need help navigating an increasingly complex world.

    — Center for an Urban Future, “Branches of Opportunity” (via queenslibrary)

  11. wnyc:


Despite the growth of e-readers and digital technology, New Yorkers are spending more time in libraries than ever, says a new report out today from the Center for an Urban Future about the changing role of our city’s public libraries in the digital age. This week on WNYC’s New Tech City, host Manoush Zomorodi delves into the topic and finds the contemporary library is about more than just digitizing documents and lending e-books to patrons on their Kindles and iPads. 

    wnyc:

    Despite the growth of e-readers and digital technology, New Yorkers are spending more time in libraries than ever, says a new report out today from the Center for an Urban Future about the changing role of our city’s public libraries in the digital age. This week on WNYC’s New Tech City, host Manoush Zomorodi delves into the topic and finds the contemporary library is about more than just digitizing documents and lending e-books to patrons on their Kindles and iPads. 

  12. New York City’s libraries are open an average of 43 hours a week, about the same as a decade ago and down from a high of 47 hours. “Even the Detroit public library system stays open longer;” the report noted. Columbus’s libraries are open an average of 72 hours a week. Despite the relatively short hours, the study found, New York City’s libraries “have experienced a 40 percent spike in the number of people attending programs and a 59 percent increase in circulation over the past decade.” San Francisco’s government contributed $101 per capita to the city’s libraries, the highest of any city in the study, while New York’s library systems all received between $30 and $40 per capita, below Seattle, Boston, Detroit and others.

    — As Use of Libraries Grows, Government Support Has Eroded - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

  13. The contemporary library is about more than just digitizing documents and lending e-books to patrons on their Kindles and iPads.

    — 

    WNYC (via queenslibrary)

    Well yes.

  14. I’m not overly emotional about the loss of books (even in the times of budget cuts, books are just small things that can be replaced), but damage to actual library buildings is really upsetting. When people lose their houses, electricity, cellphone and internet service, heat and other things that are necessary for their basic comfort, livelihood and communication, the library can serve as a lifeline. When that lifeline is gone, it can be hard to know where to turn.

    — Ingrid Henny Abrams, a children’s librarian who volunteered to help Queens Library at Howard Beach, affected by Sandy, reopen. (via queenslibrary)

  15. queenslibrary:

Happy Election Day!
(Photo from the Archives at Queens Library)

Remember to vote today!
Don’t know where your polling place is? Find out.
Feel like your vote is being suppressed? Report it to Mother Jones or call the FBI’s hotline at 1-800-253-3931.
Just a reminder to New Yorkers: because of the hurricane, you can vote at any polling place in New York state. If you are a resident of New York City or Westchester, Long Island or Rockland County, you can vote anywhere in the state of New York.

    queenslibrary:

    Happy Election Day!

    (Photo from the Archives at Queens Library)

    Remember to vote today!

    Don’t know where your polling place is? Find out.

    Feel like your vote is being suppressed? Report it to Mother Jones or call the FBI’s hotline at 1-800-253-3931.

    Just a reminder to New Yorkers: because of the hurricane, you can vote at any polling place in New York state. If you are a resident of New York City or Westchester, Long Island or Rockland County, you can vote anywhere in the state of New York.