1. willywaldo:

nypl:

Has international World Cup fever inspired you to look for some books from around the globe? If so, check out NYPL’s Literary World Cup featuring authors from each competing country. It’s a great way to find some new writers to enjoy! 

What a clever idea to promote your collection and encourage your patrons to read fiction in translation!

    willywaldo:

    nypl:

    Has international World Cup fever inspired you to look for some books from around the globe? If so, check out NYPL’s Literary World Cup featuring authors from each competing country. It’s a great way to find some new writers to enjoy! 

    What a clever idea to promote your collection and encourage your patrons to read fiction in translation!

  2. "The Crisis Is With Publishers, Not Writers": NYPL Hosts Conversation on Amazon vs. Hachette →

    livefromthenypl:

    Last night, we raised the question: Amazon: Business As Usual? Our thoughtful speakers gave their two cents, and today Flavorwire breaks down the event and highlights the questions of cultural urgency that came up.

  3. CPL, NYPL WiFi Hotspot Lending Programs Funded by Knight Foundation Grants - The Digital Shift →

  4. Snapshots from NYPL →

    We decided to offer patrons preselected options for what brings them to the Library—borrowing, exploring, learning, reading, researching, studying, visiting, writing—and where they are from—Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island, outside the New York region. By providing these options, it is quick and easy to participate and it should allow us to easily aggregate the data the way we would with traditional survey methodology. The photographs are sent to the email address provided to us and we hope our patrons will share the image, their library moment, with friends and family.

    Smile, you’re at the library! So the geniuses at NYPL have done it again! They have installed photo booths in two of their libraries and have invited the public to photograph themselves and share how they use the library. Check out all the images at the new NYPL Photo Booth account on Flickr.

    In the few weeks since installing the booths, we’ve gotten more than 1,900 photographs that represent a fascinating portrait of our patrons, from light-hearted to serious-minded individuals, couples, and families.

  5. livefromthenypl:

    Buy tickets to Toni Morrison’s return to the New York Public Library December 12 here, to attend her conversation with a huge fan, author Junot Diaz.

    IT IS ALREADY SOLD OUT? IT IS ALREADY SOLD OUT! AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLREADY SOLD OUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUTTTT.

  6. After more than five years with Library Journal (and a year working with School Library Journal and The Horn Book as well), I’m moving on. In mid-July, I’ll be starting as Deputy Director, Reference and Research Services, at the New York Public Library (NYPL).
    In my new role, I’ll be supporting access services like interlibrary loan, permissions, and digitization, among others. I’ll also help to coordinate NYPL partnerships like those with the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), HathiTrust, and Google Books.

    — 

    Farewell LJ, Hello NYPL

    Josh is leaving us, and LJ will be the poorer for it, but as recompense he does give us all a look at his LJ origin story:

    When I think back on how I’ve gotten to this point, I end up going back to my first job out of college, at a gossip magazine (you’ve definitely flipped through it while on line at the grocery store).

    I started as a copy editor but quickly moved over to and up through the ranks of the research department (yes, gossip magazines have research departments—usually good ones, because they constantly walk the litigation line). I loved the fun, fast-paced environment, filled with carefree twentysomethings who reveled in the irony of using a liberal arts education to set the bar for lowbrow.

    That is, until the job stopped being ironic. I realized after a few years that the shallow enjoyment of the irony had worn off, and though I had a knack for the research, I wanted something more. That’s when I went to library school, as I wrote in my admission essay, “to use my powers for good.”

    I never thought the experience would aid me in my search for a job related to libraries. Fortunately, I was wrong. The magazine experience helped get me an interview at LJ, and the background I gained during my LIS education, including the basics of a variety of technology skills, were enough to convince them to give me a chance (though the variety of grueling edit tests surely played a role as well).

     Follow Josh on Tumblr at hadro.tumblr.com.

  7. nypl:

    A new and exciting NYPL exhibition,The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter opens, tomorrow, June 21st in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building! This exhibition examines why children’s books are important, what and how they teach children, and what they reveal about the societies that produced them. It features more than 200 items from the Library’s collections including: Where the Wild Things Are, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Charlotte’s Web, Goodnight Moon, and many others.  Be sure to visit The ABC Of It and see some of your favorite children’s books! Visit the NYPL site for more details. 

    Well this looks awesome.

  8. librarylinknj:

    This blog post, Sesame Visits Rikers Island, is really powerful. They’ve developed a bilingual toolkit for parents, caregivers, kids, teachers & librarians to use, Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration

    At a time when 1 in 28 children in America has an incarcerated parent, there are many things public libraries and library staff can do to help kids, parents and other caregivers. We talked about this a lot at the Public Library Think Tank hosted by School Library Journal in April. Nicholas Higgins is the Director of Community Outreach for NYPL and he spoke very movingly about the work that NYPL does at Rikers Island. You can read more about it here: Prison Libraries: Public Service Inside & Out.

    Unreservedly awesome.

  9. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: Historical Tribute: Medgar Evers →

    schomburgcenter:

    Today marks the 50th Anniversary of civil rights activist Medgar Evers’ death on June 12, 1963. To commemorate Medgar Evers’ legacy we offer the inspirational song “Mississippi Goddam” created by Nina Simone following Evers’ assassination.  Evers’ life and death played a significant role in the civil rights movement to end Jim Crow laws.  After serving in WWII war, Evers returned to the U.S.,  a segregated society where blacks were treated inferiorly, which led him to commit his life to the empowerment of black people on  a grassroots level working for the NAACP. His legacy is memorialized from the naming of educational institution after him, Medgar Evers College, in Brooklyn, New York, to the naming of a U.S. navy cargo ship in his honor—USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE-13), to songs by the musicians Nina Simone, Bob Dylan, and Phil Ochs , to television series and books. Join the Schomburg in commemorating Medgar Evers by sharing his legacy.

  10. Photos, from School Library Journal's Chelsea Philpot, of Saturday and Sunday's 24-Hour Read in!

  11. Etta Thornton, LJ’s Reviews Editor, reads from E.B. White as a part of Urban Librarians Unite’s 24-Hour Read In to protest citywide library budget cuts. Swing by the Central Branch of Brooklyn Public Library anytime before 4pm tomorrow to see some amazing readers!

    Etta Thornton, LJ’s Reviews Editor, reads from E.B. White as a part of Urban Librarians Unite’s 24-Hour Read In to protest citywide library budget cuts. Swing by the Central Branch of Brooklyn Public Library anytime before 4pm tomorrow to see some amazing readers!

  12. schomburgcenter:

    To see Josephine Baker’s dance sequence skip to 2:27.  Happy Spring!

    JOSEPHINE. A million times yes.

  13. Day after day, when I still worked at the Forty-second Street branch of the public library, I saw the same young man, bearded, intense, cleaning his fingernails on the corners of the pages of a book. “What are you studying for?” I asked him once. The numbers were flashing over the counter as the books came up. “Research,” he said. “I’m writing my autobiography.” There are certainly odd people in that reading room—one who doodles the same bird endlessly on the back of a half of a single bank check, one who hums all the time, and one who keeps asking the other two to stop. A little pantomime concerto. I quit that job soon. The trouble is, I sometimes understand that research project. Or I did understand it. Then.

    — 

    Thanks to Molly McArdle, who in her latest Classic Returns column at Library Journal pulls out this passage from Renata Adler’s Speedboat.

    And might we suggest the passage to anyone looking to participate in the Urban Librarians Unite–sponsored 24 Hour Read at the Brooklyn Public Library (or any other library read-ins).

    (via nyrbclassics)

  14. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: thefindingaid: The Finding Aid: Black Women at the Intersection of Art... →

    thefindingaid:

    The Finding Aid: Black Women at the Intersection of Art and Archiving is an interactive, multi-media dialogue that explores the intersection of experimental art practices and community-based archiving.

    The event’s organization is based on the idea of a finding aid. A finding aid is a document used in archives for accessibility and discovery. We will transform a finding aid from an archival inventory/guide into an artistic archival experience.

    Our goal for this event is that people leave knowing what an archive and archivist is or can be, and that people feel empowered to begin their own archival/artistic practice or feel moved to engage with existing archives.

    Tuesday, May 21, 2013 @ 6:30pm

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

    Langston Hughes Auditorium

    ***

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    Joyce-LeeAnn is a writer, archivist and performance artist from Denver, Colorado based in Brooklyn, New York. She received a BA in Writing and Literature from Naropa University via Hampton University. She received a MILS with an Archives Certificate from Pratt Institute. She works as a professional project archivist. Joyce-LeeAnn’s writing explores the poetics of archival processing and investigates ways to tell stories through preserved documents. Subjects covered in her prose | poetry include: grief, healing processes, beautiful moments, writings on restroom walls and a fragment of black Denver history. Her experimental literary performances usually include a makeshift typewriter-drum-kit.

    // joyceleeann.com

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    Kameelah Janan Rasheed (b. 1985) is a photo-based artist, writer, and educator from East Palo Alto, CA based in Brooklyn, NY. She is a Gallery/Studio Instructor at the Brooklyn Museum as well as a public school teacher working with court involved youth in East New York. Kameelah’s work enlists archival as well as archaeological traditions to explore collective memory and her family narratives through found images from eBay and estate sells, material objects, and original photography. An object-based body of work, she interrogates the trinity of spatial trauma within Black communities — homelessness, incarceration, and forced migration and how this influences both collective memory and the way we reconstruct narratives from material fragments. Currently, she is an Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Book Arts. In 2012, Kameelah was an Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Photography at Woodstock. She will have her first solo exhibit at Real Art Ways in July 2013 tentatively entitled The Imagined Archive. A former Fulbright Scholar to South Africa, Kameelah received her Master of Education from Stanford University and a Bachelor of Arts in Policy and Africana Studies from Pomona College.

    //kameelahr.com

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    Marilyn Nance is an American visual artist known for her images of 20th century African American life—spirituality, music, art, and African retentions, She grew up through many movements—The Civil Rights Movement, Black Power, Black Arts, Anti War, Students Rights, the Women’s Movement, and the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

    A two-time finalist for the W. Eugene Smith Award in Humanistic Photography, her photographs can be found in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and in the Library of Congress.

    //marilynnance.com

    Image © Albert Chong

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    Arianne Edmonds is a Los Angeles native, storyteller and archivist. Her historical collection spans from 1886-1950 and explores the uniqueness of early black Los Angeles, through the lens of genealogy. She received her Bachelors of Science in Communications, from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and started her career in educational media at Sesame Workshop. She currently works with the Taproot Foundation managing consultant relations and community partnerships.

    // edmondsfamilyexploration.tumblr.com

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    Ladi’Sasha Jones is a is a collector and witness worker of oral history narratives with a special interest in documenting Black women’s stories and Black American family life. She approaches her documentation practice by working from the intersections of cultural equity and collective community memory.

    Currently, Ladi’Sasha is working on the curation of a public forum to share her collection of oral history records via a digital sound art gallery — coming Summer 2013. Having earned her B.A. in African American Studies from Temple University in 2010 and a M.A. in Arts Politics from NYU Tisch School of the Arts in 2012, she recently completed a Certificate in Oral History from Baylor University in April of 2013. She aims to move towards freelancing and sharing her documenting services with community and cultural arts organizations along with individual artists.

    //ladijones.com

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    Shawn(ta) Smithis a lesbian separatist, writer, archivist and reference librarian. Her essays blend storytelling with documentation and archiving. Her work will appear in “Black Gay Genius Interview with Lisa C. Moore” in Black Gay Genius: Joseph Beam and In the Life (forthcoming).  She is currently editing a new anthology Her Saturn Returns: Queer Women of Color Life Transitions, a compilation of narratives of queer women and color in their Saturn.  Shawn is a collective member of the Lesbian Herstory Archives and the WOW Cafe Theater where she co-produces Rivers of Honey, a monthly Cabaret highlighting the art of women of color. Shawn is pursuing her MFA in Fiction at Queens College while working as a reference & instruction librarian at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  She is the former Archive Coordinator for StoryCorps.

    //hersaturnreturns.com //riversofhoney.com

     Photo © Arianne Benford

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    Sonia Louise Davis(b. 1988, New York City) is an artist and photographer. Using a large format view camera, her work mines the public and private archive, exploring collective memory and family history through site-specific and community-based projects. Sonia is currently participating in the Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) Program at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. An honors graduate of Wesleyan University, she holds a BA in African American Studies, with a concentration in Music and Visual Art.

    //sonialouisedavis.com

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    Born in Las Vegas,Salome Asega is an Ethiopian visual artist and independent curator working in Brooklyn.  She received her BA in Transnational Visual Art and Social Practice from the Gallatin School at NYU and is currently an MFA candidate in the Design and Technology program at Parsons The New School for Design. She is also a founding member of the Sistah Friends Project.

    //eyesearsmouth.com

    The intersection of art and archiving? Yes please.

  15. nypl:

Was one of Brooklyn’s finest in Harlem in 1939? This Sid Grossman photo of “Harlem Loiterers” from the Prints Collection at NYPL’s Schomburg Center for Research In Black Culture has created quite a stir since being posted to the Center’s Facebook page the other day. Why? Because the man on the right looks a heck of a lot like Jay-Z (for evidence, check out these photos of Jay-Z when he visited The New York Public Library in 2011). Cue Twilight Zone music, right? Schomburg’s Curator of Digital Collections Sylviane A. Diouf found the photo while researching an exhibition, and said, “I was immediately struck by the similarity to Jay-Z and actually laughed out loud … I still hope somebody will tell us who that you man really was.”
So is Jay-Z a time traveler? Is this someone else - anyone know who? What do you think?

My favorite answer so far has been Tumblarian librarianpirate’s: “Wrong. Beyonce is a time lord, Jay-Z is her companion.”

    nypl:

    Was one of Brooklyn’s finest in Harlem in 1939? This Sid Grossman photo of “Harlem Loiterers” from the Prints Collection at NYPL’s Schomburg Center for Research In Black Culture has created quite a stir since being posted to the Center’s Facebook page the other day. Why? Because the man on the right looks a heck of a lot like Jay-Z (for evidence, check out these photos of Jay-Z when he visited The New York Public Library in 2011). Cue Twilight Zone music, right? Schomburg’s Curator of Digital Collections Sylviane A. Diouf found the photo while researching an exhibition, and said, “I was immediately struck by the similarity to Jay-Z and actually laughed out loud … I still hope somebody will tell us who that you man really was.”

    So is Jay-Z a time traveler? Is this someone else - anyone know who? What do you think?

    My favorite answer so far has been Tumblarian librarianpirate’s: “Wrong. Beyonce is a time lord, Jay-Z is her companion.”