1. 

Smith, Zadie. NW. Penguin Pr: Penguin Group (USA). ISBN 9781594203978. $25.95; ebk. ISBN 9781101595923. F
Relating the story of four people in North West London, Smith articulates important issues of race and class, but what matters most is her distinctive narrative voice. In numbered, run-on chapters that occasionally turn to aphorism, memo, and even poetry, Smith shows us how to write for the 21st century, when the online environment has changed our way of thinking, that makes other books sound ordinary. An aesthetic and emotional knockout. (LJ 9/15/12)—Barbara Hoffert


See all of Library Journal's Best Books 2012: Top Ten

    Smith, Zadie. NW. Penguin Pr: Penguin Group (USA). ISBN 9781594203978. $25.95; ebk. ISBN 9781101595923. F

    Relating the story of four people in North West London, Smith articulates important issues of race and class, but what matters most is her distinctive narrative voice. In numbered, run-on chapters that occasionally turn to aphorism, memo, and even poetry, Smith shows us how to write for the 21st century, when the online environment has changed our way of thinking, that makes other books sound ordinary. An aesthetic and emotional knockout. (LJ 9/15/12)—Barbara Hoffert

    See all of Library Journal's Best Books 2012: Top Ten

  2. thepenguinpress:

Zadie Smith is in the Penguin offices today to sign all of these. Did we mention we’ve earmarked five copies for a giveaway? Enter here.
And if you haven’t seen Zadie Smith’s interactive tour of London, we highly recommend it.

Trying with all my might not to lurk outside the Penguin offices on my lunch break. (It doesn’t help that they are only a couple blocks away.)

    thepenguinpress:

    Zadie Smith is in the Penguin offices today to sign all of these. Did we mention we’ve earmarked five copies for a giveaway? Enter here.

    And if you haven’t seen Zadie Smith’s interactive tour of London, we highly recommend it.

    Trying with all my might not to lurk outside the Penguin offices on my lunch break. (It doesn’t help that they are only a couple blocks away.)

  3. thepenguinpress:

Let Zadie Smith guide you on a tour of the real-life locations in NW.
We’ve been working on this for a while, and we’re very excited to share it with you.

This is really cool.

    thepenguinpress:

    Let Zadie Smith guide you on a tour of the real-life locations in NW.

    We’ve been working on this for a while, and we’re very excited to share it with you.

    This is really cool.

  4. I grew up reading a generation of American and English people like [Saul] Bellow, [John] Updike or [Martin] Amis. Everybody’s neutral unless they’re black — then you hear about it: the black man, the black woman, the black person. Of course, if you happen to be black the world doesn’t look that way to you. I just wanted to try and create perhaps a sense of alienation and otherness in this person, the white reader, to remind them that they are not neutral to other people.

    — Zadie Smith, discussing how she never mentions the race of any of the characters in her new novel, NW, unless they are white. (via theraconteurasaurus)

    (Source: NPR)

  5. When we were children, you’d never imagine that you’d get into a right/left argument about the purpose and use of a library. It seems extraordinary to me[…] I really don’t find it a political argument. It’s about equality of opportunity. You know you don’t expect everyone to be as educated as everyone else or have the same achievements but you expect at least to be offered at least some of the opportunities and libraries are the most simple and the most open way to give people access to books.

    — Wise words from Zadie Smith  (via hostilities). Exceptionally appropriate on this, the publication day of her truly incredibly latest novel, NW.

  6. The Millions has posted the opening lines from Zadie Smith's new novel NW →