1. Silent Films Preservation Study Underlines Difficulties of Film Archiving →

    A recent study commissioned by the Library of Congress found that, of the more than 11,000 silent films produced by American movie studios between 1912 and 1929, just 14 percent (1,575) survive today in their original domestic release. Another 11 percent are still technically complete, according to the study conducted by film archivist David Pierce, but only in imperfect formats. Some are repatriated foreign release versions that lack the original English title cards and may have been edited to appeal to foreign audiences, which Pierce compares to imperfect retranslations of novels, where the story remains the same, but nuances may be lost. Others may be preserved on smaller format, 16 or 28 mm film stock, which can negatively impact image quality.

    Fairbanks 300x233 Silent Films Preservation Study Underlines Difficulties of Film Archiving

    Douglas Fairbanks in “The Mask of Zorro” (1920) by
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ocarchives/6752052115/
    NonCommercial License

    The report underscores some of the difficulties faced by archivists dedicated to preserving the world’s cinematic heritage, from full length features to educational filmstrips. Some of the films may remain intact in archives where harried film technicians have not had time to identify, much less restore the work. Others, though, are likely gone forever, lost to an early Hollywood culture that saw no value in maintaining movies they couldn’t sell tickets to anymore.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  2. iamaliberrian:

jothelibrarian:

erikkwakkel:

uispeccoll:

clirhiddencollections:

vintagelibraries:

Men and women looking through the card catalogues at the Library of Congress, 1941.

A visual reminder to be grateful for OPACs!

Wow, this really gives you a sense of scale.

This is how scholars found the literature they needed: by going through alphabetical card catalogues - one on author, one on subject, containing thousands and thousands of cards. The bigger the library the more cards. The Library of Congress is obviously a sizable library…

WOW! I remember the old card catalogue at the Bodleian, snaking around the corridor of the New Library… but seeing the Library of Congress catalogue in one room… wow.

Wow… I can’t imagine searching like that…

    iamaliberrian:

    jothelibrarian:

    erikkwakkel:

    uispeccoll:

    clirhiddencollections:

    vintagelibraries:

    Men and women looking through the card catalogues at the Library of Congress, 1941.

    A visual reminder to be grateful for OPACs!

    Wow, this really gives you a sense of scale.

    This is how scholars found the literature they needed: by going through alphabetical card catalogues - one on author, one on subject, containing thousands and thousands of cards. The bigger the library the more cards. The Library of Congress is obviously a sizable library…

    WOW! I remember the old card catalogue at the Bodleian, snaking around the corridor of the New Library… but seeing the Library of Congress catalogue in one room… wow.

    Wow… I can’t imagine searching like that…

  3. If Federal Government Shutdown Happens All Library of Congress Web Sites and Resources Will Be Taken Offline, Buildings Closed →

    The clock is ticking! Will Congress be able to get its act together? Is this anyway to run a government? Tumblrarians, how will your library be affected if this happens?

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  4. Budget Cuts Hobble Library of Congress →

  5. 
In a 1988 review of DeLillo’s Kennedy assassination novel, Libra, which appeared in the New York Review of Books, Robert Towers called DeLillo “chief shaman of the paranoid school of American fiction,” and the term has stuck. DeLillo said in his 1993 interview with the Paris Review, “I’m not particularly paranoid myself. I’ve drawn this element out of the air around me, and it was a stronger force in the sixties and seventies than it is now. The important thing about the paranoia in my characters is that it operates as a form of religious awe. It’s something old, a leftover from some forgotten part of the soul.”

Don DeLillo Wins First Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction | Library Journal

    In a 1988 review of DeLillo’s Kennedy assassination novel, Libra, which appeared in the New York Review of Books, Robert Towers called DeLillo “chief shaman of the paranoid school of American fiction,” and the term has stuck. DeLillo said in his 1993 interview with the Paris Review, “I’m not particularly paranoid myself. I’ve drawn this element out of the air around me, and it was a stronger force in the sixties and seventies than it is now. The important thing about the paranoia in my characters is that it operates as a form of religious awe. It’s something old, a leftover from some forgotten part of the soul.”

    Don DeLillo Wins First Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction | Library Journal

  6. momalibrary:

ok - last Ruscha post. March 1964 issue of Artforum with a great ad for Twentysix Gasoline Stations. Ruscha’s book was rejected and returned to him after he submitted it to the Library of Congress. - ds

    momalibrary:

    ok - last Ruscha post. March 1964 issue of Artforum with a great ad for Twentysix Gasoline Stations. Ruscha’s book was rejected and returned to him after he submitted it to the Library of Congress. - ds

  7. Favorite LoC subject class GO!

    patrondebris:

    thepinakes:

    librarean:

    P for me!

    I’m on the Z Team.

    PRs 4eva

    I don’t understand this but I admire it.

  8. thepinakes:

pussreboots:

thepinakes:

Why, Library of Congress, why would you have me shelve these two books so far away from each other?

PZ7 is supposed to be an obsolete classification for children’s literature. Obviously the person who did the LCN for Catching Fire was working under the old system.  We use PZ7, though, at HNU. Give me Mocking Jay and Hunger Games (if it also needs fixing) and I’ll put them all together. We can discuss which option is best for the books: PS or PZ.

It’s helpful being followed by your cataloger.

<3

    thepinakes:

    pussreboots:

    thepinakes:

    Why, Library of Congress, why would you have me shelve these two books so far away from each other?

    PZ7 is supposed to be an obsolete classification for children’s literature. Obviously the person who did the LCN for Catching Fire was working under the old system.  We use PZ7, though, at HNU. Give me Mocking Jay and Hunger Games (if it also needs fixing) and I’ll put them all together. We can discuss which option is best for the books: PS or PZ.

    It’s helpful being followed by your cataloger.

    <3

  9. Clarifications in re Indian Tribe LCSH

    morerobots:

    gov-info:

    For the record: 1. This is not the first appearance of Nation LCSH. 2. For those non-catalogers: “corporation” in cat-speak means “group” or “organization” (as used in MARC field 110), not “company.”

    I mean, it’s still racism because despite having Nation LCSH, it was refusing to acknowledge Nations as their own Governments, which they are.

    More discussion on the recent LoC catalog changes for Native tribes.

  10. Doesn’t help the image of a library as a 21st-century tool, when we’re catching up on sociological trends from the 20th or 19th century.

    — Crossett Library on the new Headings for Native tribes. (via morerobots)

  11. Librarian Docs: Headings for Indian Tribes Recognized by the U.S. Government →

    junk-pile:

    libraryjournal:

    gov-info:

    The Policy and Standards Division has determined that names of Indian tribes recognized by the U.S. government as legal entities will henceforth be tagged 151 (Geographic name) in name authority records rather than 110 (Corporate name), as they were previously tagged. This change in status of headings for tribal entities to 151 (Geographic name) will enable these headings to be used as jurisdictions when needed in cataloging. When a heading of this type is used to represent a government (110) the MARC 21 indicator will be set to “1” to reflect that this entity is acting as the name of a jurisdiction. These headings may also be used as geographic subdivisions, subdivided directly. This is in keeping with the guidance provided in rule 21.35 of theAnglo-American Cataloguing Rules2nd edition (AACR2) in regard to treating tribal entities as national governments.

    By authority of the U.S. government, a growing number of tribal entities have been formally recognized and are federally acknowledged to have immunities and privileges by virtue of their government-to-government relationship with the United States as well as powers, limitations, responsibilities, and obligations attributed to such tribes. This means that tribes recognized by the U.S. government are independent, autonomous political entities with inherent powers of self- government; they possess sovereignty and are equivalent to national governments. To date, there are over 500 recognized tribes within the continental United States alone. Virtually all federally recognized tribes have jurisdiction over some delimited area of land, a geographic place, although land and area vary with each tribe.

    Library racism.

    I think moving American Indian tribes under geographic headings makes a lot more sense than keeping them under “corporate entities,” considering that they don’t function at all like corporations. They govern themselves apart from whatever local government is nearby, acting more like individual countries. I don’t really see how the LC’s move is racist.

    Nah! What I meant was that it has taken the LoC this long to officially recognize the sovereignty of native tribes speaks to centuries of institutionalized racism. So in sum, the move is a good one, but overdue and reflective of some of the LoC’s longstanding problems.

  12. theparisreview:

The Library of Congress has begun publishing the Library of Congress Magazine, a bimonthly journal to showcase items from the Library’s collections. You can download the first issue here.

    theparisreview:

    The Library of Congress has begun publishing the Library of Congress Magazine, a bimonthly journal to showcase items from the Library’s collections. You can download the first issue here.

  13. bookavore:

The snacks at the Library of Congress shop, proving no librarian anywhere can resist a pun.

    bookavore:

    The snacks at the Library of Congress shop, proving no librarian anywhere can resist a pun.

  14. From the Washington Post, Library of Congress obtains astronomer Carl Sagan’s personal papers:

The life of Carl Sagan now fills the tabletops of two vast rooms in the Madison Building of the Library of Congress. The life arrived in recent weeks at the building’s loading dock on 41 pallets containing 798 boxes.
Sagan famously talked about billions of stars and billions of galaxies, and it appears that he saved roughly that many pieces of paper.

    From the Washington Post, Library of Congress obtains astronomer Carl Sagan’s personal papers:

    The life of Carl Sagan now fills the tabletops of two vast rooms in the Madison Building of the Library of Congress. The life arrived in recent weeks at the building’s loading dock on 41 pallets containing 798 boxes.

    Sagan famously talked about billions of stars and billions of galaxies, and it appears that he saved roughly that many pieces of paper.

  15. 5 Things Thursday: Healthcare Metadata, LOC Legends, Lost Generation

    modlibrarian:

    Here are five things to discuss on the beach.

    1. Did you know the Library of Congress now has some killer audio interviews with rock icons?
    2. Digital asset management tip of the week.
    3. Musings on healthcare information and Dublin Core metadata.
    4. Interested in the Dutch National Archives? Well they released over 140K press photos.
    5. Are we in the midst of a lost generation of librarians?