1. Moving day at 160 Varick Street. Library Journal bids farewell to Soho and spectacular sunsets as we head down to the Financial District. As of Monday, July 21, our new address is 123 William Street., Suite 802, New York, NY 10038.

  2. Wanted: Presentations for LJ/SLJ October 1 Virtual Event “The Digital Shift” →

    Library Journal and School Library Journal are looking for a few good presentations to enhance our annual virtual program “The Digital Shift” on October 1, 2014. This year’s theme: “Libraries @ the Center.” If you have a compelling story to share about innovation in libraries—from new takes on curation, workforce development, and content creation, to great examples of collaboration and programs that enhance learning—we’d like to hear from you.

    But you’d better hurry, proposals are due by May 2.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  3. Look at what landed on my desk. I love the smell of fresh print in the morning.

    Look at what landed on my desk. I love the smell of fresh print in the morning.

  4. The April 15 issue of LJ is closed and off to the printer!  This one was a killer, but it’s packed with great stuff (including our Genre Spotlight Feature on Mystery).

    The April 15 issue of LJ is closed and off to the printer!  This one was a killer, but it’s packed with great stuff (including our Genre Spotlight Feature on Mystery).

  5. 
Hired in 1992 as manager of the tiny St. John Branch (SJB) of Washington State’s Whitman County Rural Library District (WCRLD), Clancy Pool worked to perform the miracle of bringing a new spirit and library to the town’s 525 residents, plus another 500 who live in the surrounding area.


Congratulations to Clancy Pool, LJ’s Paralibrarian of the Year 2014.

    Hired in 1992 as manager of the tiny St. John Branch (SJB) of Washington State’s Whitman County Rural Library District (WCRLD), Clancy Pool worked to perform the miracle of bringing a new spirit and library to the town’s 525 residents, plus another 500 who live in the surrounding area.

    Congratulations to Clancy Pool, LJ’s Paralibrarian of the Year 2014.

  6. Last Pages of 2013 | What We’re Reading

    Happy New Year—almost! The Library Journal/School Library Journal staffers are ringing out the old by perusing Christmas presents, scaring themselves silly, emulating the French, getting on board with power popsters, checking out how the other half lives, munching on millipedes, and watching 1913 through the lens of time.

  7. I would like to present my successor, who will be taking up the LJ Tumblr around August 26: Liz French! Here’s what she has to say about herself:

I hail from Indiana, where it’s practically a law that you like basketball. I do like basketball, also watching old movies, collecting — and wearing — vintage clothing, reading voraciously (but of course!), and hanging out with my adorable rat terrier mix, Pitzi. Oh, and the boyfriend, Otto the artist.

Say hello!

    I would like to present my successor, who will be taking up the LJ Tumblr around August 26: Liz French! Here’s what she has to say about herself:

    I hail from Indiana, where it’s practically a law that you like basketball. I do like basketball, also watching old movies, collecting — and wearing — vintage clothing, reading voraciously (but of course!), and hanging out with my adorable rat terrier mix, Pitzi. Oh, and the boyfriend, Otto the artist.

    Say hello!

  8. Tomorrow is my last day at LJ before I start my MFA in fiction at UMass Amherst. I am going to be posting Beyoncé gifs all day. Get ready.

  9. As the job landscape continues to shift, the mission of schools and libraries to address the gap intensifies, and the work of the key players, teachers and librarians, has never been more essential. Of course, they need support with infrastructure—like that provided by the recently reformed E-rate program—to level the playing field. And, as critically, we need enough teachers and librarians to go around, so we don’t keep exacerbating the other gaps with what’s been called an attention gap as class sizes grow and librarians get stretched thin. Our kids need all the engaged grown-ups they can get in their lives.

    — Rebecca T. Miller, “Matters of Equity: As the Divide Grows, We Must Help Level the Playing Field for All of Our Kids” (via schoollibraryjournal)

  10. But the opportunities are myriad if we view patrons as whole people with needs beyond what any one department or service point can offer. For example, we must collaborate with fluidity and serve college students who also need life-skill support—or even pleasure reading. If we work to create this kind of culture, provide this kind of service, everyone will benefit.

    — 

    The End of Turf | Editorial, by Rebecca Miller

    Rebecca’s first editorial as libraryjournal & schoollibraryjournal’s joint EIC is a fiercely intelligent thing of beauty. 

    (via librarylinknj)

  11. heyanniebrown:

libraryjournal:

Yes! In case you haven’t heard, I’m heading off to grad school this August to get my MFA in fiction at UMass Amherst. (What? Yes.) You can read more about it here.
Don’t worry, I am not leaving the Internet at all. I will still be here on the Internet for and with all of you.

Oh hey, I’m on the Library Journal tumblr. Maybe someday, I can be on it again for a much cooler reason.
Congratulations, Molly!

    heyanniebrown:

    libraryjournal:

    Yes! In case you haven’t heard, I’m heading off to grad school this August to get my MFA in fiction at UMass Amherst. (What? Yes.) You can read more about it here.

    Don’t worry, I am not leaving the Internet at all. I will still be here on the Internet for and with all of you.

    Oh hey, I’m on the Library Journal tumblr. Maybe someday, I can be on it again for a much cooler reason.

    Congratulations, Molly!

    image

  12. Yes! In case you haven’t heard, I’m heading off to grad school this August to get my MFA in fiction at UMass Amherst. (What? Yes.) You can read more about it here.
Don’t worry, I am not leaving the Internet at all. I will still be here for and with all of you.

    Yes! In case you haven’t heard, I’m heading off to grad school this August to get my MFA in fiction at UMass Amherst. (What? Yes.) You can read more about it here.

    Don’t worry, I am not leaving the Internet at all. I will still be here for and with all of you.

  13. LJ Associate Editor Mahnaz Dar is seeking reviewers interested in reviewing books related to self-help, as well as potential reviewers interested in cooking and food-related titles. Email her!

    LJ Associate Editor Mahnaz Dar is seeking reviewers interested in reviewing books related to self-help, as well as potential reviewers interested in cooking and food-related titles. Email her!

  14. I’ve been thinking about what I’ll do my last day running the LJ tumblr and at this point there’s a 87% chance that I will just be posting my favorite Beyonce gifs all day. As a way to say goodbye.

  15. Behind Closed Doors on Long Island | Memoir

    Dylan told us all that “everything is gonna be diff’rent when I paint my masterpiece.” The belief that things could be different, even if they weren’t going to be perfect, carried many of this month’s memoirists through very trying times. Masterpieces are not always on canvas: here we glimpse families, houses, and careers that are themselves real works of art.

    Coincidentally, half of this month’s memoirs deal with growing up on Long Island. The circumstances described range from apparently idyllic to squalor—you just never know what’s going on in the house next door, do you?

    LJ memoir columnist (and Long Island resident) Therese Nielsen tackles memoirs about what goes on behind closed doors.