1. Count Your Chickens | Urban Farming & Homesteading

With the spread of farming and homesteading from rural and suburban areas to urban lots and rooftops, these 35 titles will help patrons sow the cream of their own crops.

I’m crowing about Kristi Chadwick’s most excellent collection development feature. 

    Count Your Chickens | Urban Farming & Homesteading

    With the spread of farming and homesteading from rural and suburban areas to urban lots and rooftops, these 35 titles will help patrons sow the cream of their own crops.

    I’m crowing about Kristi Chadwick’s most excellent collection development feature. 

  2. New Worlds to Explore | Genre Spotlight →

    Judging by the upcoming fall publishing season, there will be plenty of speculative fiction titles to sharpen readers’ minds, but no one particular trend is leading the charge. Sf and fantasy has attracted a far more diverse readership than ever before, and publishing success can be found by exploring that diversity. Military sf and space opera stage a revival, fantasy goes dark, and digital publishing is here to stay.

    Get your SF/fantasy geek on! Fellow Tumblrarian Genre Junkie shines a spotlight on winter 2013/spring 2014 titles. Prepare to have your mind blown with Pierce Brown’s Red Rising.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  3. Books, Yarn, Ink & Other Pursuits: ARCs to Print →

    booksyarnink:

    This June I will be co-presenting with Kelly Jensen and Liz Burns “All About ARCs” at ALA Annual, and we have a question for authors out there:

    Can you help us with a panel presentation at the American Library Association conference? If you’re an author, we’d love your answer to our single question, and we’d love if you’d spread the word. All answers are anonymous (though if you name your book, we’ll know who you are). We want to discuss the changes that occur between the Advanced Reader Copies of books and the final product and how the ARC is not an acceptable substitute for a finished book. Anything you can tell us would be great, be it problems with print or digital ARCs.

    Feel free to answer here or at our survey page!

  4. booksyarnink:

It still gives me chills to see my name in print.

We <3 you too, Kristi.

    booksyarnink:

    It still gives me chills to see my name in print.

    We <3 you too, Kristi.

  5. I always love a headline that presumes to inform an entire profession about what else it could be doing. Because librarians aren’t doing much of anything out there—no programs, no reader’s advisory, no stretching dollars, no research or reference requests, no accommodations of the public and community… This may get a little more ranty than I usually am on this blog, but reading the second part of this post from David Vinjamuri at Forbes (“Why Public Libraries Matter: And How They Can Do More”) got my hackles up in so many ways.

    — Books, Yarn, Ink and Other Pursuits: What Public Libraries Could Do: Besides Everything That They Are Already Doing

  6. Perhaps crossovers are just what Doctor Who ordered to perpetuate speculative fiction’s readership.

    — Kristi Chadwick in the article “Hungry for SF” in the Aug 12 issue of Library Journal (via straddlingtheborderline)