1. Finalists Announced for Los Angeles Times Book Prizes →

    This year’s Los Angeles Times Book Prizes will also honor Susan Straight with the 2013 Robert Kirsch Award, a lifetime achievement award, and John Green with the Innovator’s Award. Straight, a Book Prize finalist in 2006 for A Million Nightingales and an NBA finalist in 2001 for Highwire Moon, was praised by Times book critic and awards emcee David L. Ulin as “a Southern California original and a tireless supporter, and creator, of our literary culture.” Librarians will generally agree that Printz winner and Nerdfighters purveyor Green, known for his YA fiction and encouragement of online reader activism, deserves recognition for his cutting-edge work.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  2. franzencomesalive:

    “I am not in the widget-selling business. I am not in the profit-maximization business. I’m in the book business, the idea-sharing, consciousness-expanding, story-telling business, and I am not going to get out of that business, So fuck Ayn Rand, and fuck any company that profits from peddling the lie of mere individualism. We built this together, and we’re going to keep building it together.”—John Green

  3. schoollibraryjournal:

Which camera does author John Green pose for at #SXSWEdu? School Library Journal’s.

    schoollibraryjournal:

    Which camera does author John Green pose for at #SXSWEdu? School Library Journal’s.

  4. schoollibraryjournal:

    Awesome indeed!

    Last night Penguin presented John and Hank Green: An Evening of Awesome at Carnegie Hall. The extravaganza included performances by the Mountain Goats and Kimya Dawson and a surprise appearance by Neil Gaiman.

    Check out the rest of SLJ’s photos on our Flickr

    This is the beautiful thing that happens when great books and great internet meet.

  5. penguinteen:


It’s been a year since the publication of Green’s acclaimed The Fault in Our Stars. To mark the anniversary, Green and his brother will be performing at Carnegie Hall—and everyone is invited, via live streaming video! Find an event near your hometown and you won’t have to miss a second of it. Be sure to check your local event, as some are first come first serve (no tickets), and some require reservations.
Casa Grande, AZ
Saratoga, CA,
Capitola, CA
Berkeley, CA
Alameda, CA
Pleasanton CA
Menlo Park, CA
Novato, CA
Westminster, CO
Naperville, IL
Indianapolis, IN
Indianapolis, IN
Noblesville, IN
Danville, IN
Brookline, MA
Beverly, MA
Cohasset, MA
Carlisle, MA
Fryeburg, ME
Takoma Park, MD
Grand Rapids, MI
Mount Laurel, NJ
Cape May Court House, NJ
Cherry Hill, NJ
Belvidere, NJ
Albuquerque, NM 
Upper Darby, PA
Overhill, Stephenville, TX
Danville, VA
Standardsville, VA
Chatham, VA
Charlottesville, VA
Crozet, VA 
Burlington, VT  05401
Bellingham, WA
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam


This is tonight, folks! Many of these local events are taking place in libraries. Check out if a nearby branch is participating!

    penguinteen:

    It’s been a year since the publication of Green’s acclaimed The Fault in Our Stars. To mark the anniversary, Green and his brother will be performing at Carnegie Hall—and everyone is invited, via live streaming video! Find an event near your hometown and you won’t have to miss a second of it. Be sure to check your local event, as some are first come first serve (no tickets), and some require reservations.

    • Casa Grande, AZ
    • Saratoga, CA,
    • Capitola, CA
    • Berkeley, CA
    • Alameda, CA
    • Pleasanton CA
    • Menlo Park, CA
    • Novato, CA
    • Westminster, CO
    • Naperville, IL
    • Indianapolis, IN
    • Indianapolis, IN
    • Noblesville, IN
    • Danville, IN
    • Brookline, MA
    • Beverly, MA
    • Cohasset, MA
    • Carlisle, MA
    • Fryeburg, ME
    • Takoma Park, MD
    • Grand Rapids, MI
    • Mount Laurel, NJ
    • Cape May Court House, NJ
    • Cherry Hill, NJ
    • Belvidere, NJ
    • Albuquerque, NM 
    • Upper Darby, PA
    • Overhill, Stephenville, TX
    • Danville, VA
    • Standardsville, VA
    • Chatham, VA
    • Charlottesville, VA
    • Crozet, VA 
    • Burlington, VT  05401
    • Bellingham, WA
    • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    This is tonight, folks! Many of these local events are taking place in libraries. Check out if a nearby branch is participating!

  6. penguinteen:


It’s been a year since the publication of Green’s acclaimed The Fault in Our Stars. To mark the anniversary, Green and his brother will be performing at Carnegie Hall—and everyone is invited, via live streaming video! Find an event near your hometown and you won’t have to miss a second of it. Be sure to check your local event, as some are first come first serve (no tickets), and some require reservations.
Casa Grande, AZ
Saratoga, CA,
Capitola, CA
Berkeley, CA
Alameda, CA
Pleasanton CA
Menlo Park, CA
Novato, CA
Westminster, CO
Naperville, IL
Indianapolis, IN
Indianapolis, IN
Noblesville, IN
Danville, IN
Brookline, MA
Beverly, MA
Cohasset, MA
Carlisle, MA
Fryeburg, ME
Takoma Park, MD
Grand Rapids, MI
Mount Laurel, NJ
Cape May Court House, NJ
Cherry Hill, NJ
Belvidere, NJ
Albuquerque, NM 
Upper Darby, PA
Overhill, Stephenville, TX
Danville, VA
Standardsville, VA
Chatham, VA
Charlottesville, VA
Crozet, VA 
Burlington, VT  05401
Bellingham, WA
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam


Check out all of the details for the local events! Lotta libraries involved in this here thing.

    penguinteen:

    It’s been a year since the publication of Green’s acclaimed The Fault in Our Stars. To mark the anniversary, Green and his brother will be performing at Carnegie Hall—and everyone is invited, via live streaming video! Find an event near your hometown and you won’t have to miss a second of it. Be sure to check your local event, as some are first come first serve (no tickets), and some require reservations.

    • Casa Grande, AZ
    • Saratoga, CA,
    • Capitola, CA
    • Berkeley, CA
    • Alameda, CA
    • Pleasanton CA
    • Menlo Park, CA
    • Novato, CA
    • Westminster, CO
    • Naperville, IL
    • Indianapolis, IN
    • Indianapolis, IN
    • Noblesville, IN
    • Danville, IN
    • Brookline, MA
    • Beverly, MA
    • Cohasset, MA
    • Carlisle, MA
    • Fryeburg, ME
    • Takoma Park, MD
    • Grand Rapids, MI
    • Mount Laurel, NJ
    • Cape May Court House, NJ
    • Cherry Hill, NJ
    • Belvidere, NJ
    • Albuquerque, NM 
    • Upper Darby, PA
    • Overhill, Stephenville, TX
    • Danville, VA
    • Standardsville, VA
    • Chatham, VA
    • Charlottesville, VA
    • Crozet, VA 
    • Burlington, VT  05401
    • Bellingham, WA
    • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    Check out all of the details for the local events! Lotta libraries involved in this here thing.

  7. John Green on "Why Libraries Are Different From Piracy" →

    fishingboatproceeds:

    Yesterday on twitter, I expressed annoyance with the hundreds of people who send me emails or tumblr messages or whatever to let me know that they illegally downloaded one of my books, as if they expect me to reply with my hearty congratulations that they are technologically sophisticated enough to use google or whatever. (I dislike it when people pirate my books. I know that not all authors feel this way, but I do. As I’ve discussed before, I think copyright law is disastrously stupid in the US, but I don’t think piracy is an appropriate response to that stupidity.*)

    I then pointed out that my books are already available for free at thousands of public libraries not just in the US, but also in Europe, South America, Australia, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, the UK, etc., to which many people replied, What’s the difference between pirating a book and checking it out from the library?

    1. Libraries are broadly collecting institutions curated by experts. The curation facet of a library is hugely important: We train these librarians to organize information based not solely on what is popular (which is what piracy does), but also on what is good. The truth is you can’t get “anything” via piracy; there are hundreds of thousands of books you can’t get, because they aren’t yet popular. American public and school libraries play a huge role in preserving the breadth of American literature by collecting and sharing books that are excellent but may not be written by YouTubers with large bulit-in audiences.

    Libraries improve the quality of discourse in their communities in ways that piracy simply does not. And if it weren’t for the broad but carefully curated collection practices of libraries, the world of American literature would look a lot like the world of American film: Instead of hundreds of books being published every week, there would be four or five.

    2. Libraries buy books. Lots of them. And there are tens of thousands of libraries around the country. That is good for me and good for my book. (Like, the average library copy of The Fault in Our Stars might get checked out 100 times, or even a thousand, butsingle files of Looking for Alaska have been illegally downloaded more than 50,000 times.)

    3. For the more than 100 million Americans without Internet access at home, libraries are the only free places to use the web to search for jobs or connect with family or buy t-shirts at dftba.com. I am very happy if my books can help add value to institutions that facilitate such important services. I do not feel the same way about BitTorrent.

    4. And this is the most important: I believe that creators of books should have control over how their work is distributed. If, for instance, a musician doesn’t want her songs played during Rick Santorum rallies, then Rick Santorum should not be allowed to use them. I don’t want my books to be available for free download (unless you borrow an e-copy from a library, that is). I just don’t. It’s not because I’m a greedy bastard or want to keep my books from people who might otherwise read them. It’s because I believe books are valuable. Right now, on Amazon, my brand new hardcover book costs about $10, which represents 1.2 hours of work at the federal minimum wage. I believe books are worth 1.2 hours of work. 

    One last thing: A lot of people compare the world of books with the world of music. I think this comparison is unfair. For one thing, CDs were overpriced before Napster. I really don’t believe that books—at least my books—are currently overpriced**. More importantly, most musicians have a secondary source of income: They can charge for live performances. Writers—or at least the vast majority of writers—can’t do this. The book is The Thing. The book is all we have to offer.

    And in my opinion, libraries preserve the integrity and the value of the book in ways that piracy simply does not.

    Based on how many of you have already seen Season 2 of Sherlock, I realize that most of you disagree with me. And I’m happy to acknowledge that I might be wrong. I welcome your thoughts and responses on these complicated questions.

    * The whole argument that piracy is some kind of civil disobedience in response to unfair copyright laws is ridiculous and indicates to me that not enough people are reading Civil Disobedience, or even the wikipedia article about it.

    ** As pointed out by no less an authority than John Darnielle, CDs weren’t overpriced by many independent record labels. Also, I should add that many books—particularly literary fiction hardcovers published for adults—are overpriced, sometimes dramatically. I think this is a bad and discouraging trend, which is one of the (many) reasons why I like publishing my books the way I do: It’s still possible for a hardcover to cost less than $20, and if you adjust for inflation, it always should be.

  8. 35 Going on 13 columnist Angelina Benedetti reviews John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars in her latest column.

    Green, John. The Fault in Our Stars. Dutton Juvenile. 2012. 336p. ISBN 9780525478812. $17.99.

    The release of any book by Green is eagerly anticipated by teen and adult readers alike. Drawing even more attention to his latest offering, the popular author determined to autograph all 150,000 copies of the book’s first print run, making it an Amazon best seller over a month before its publication date. Lofty expectations, and Green delivers; this story of two teens fighting end-stage cancer may be his best book to date. Hazel is alive (but depressed) thanks to a miracle drug that has bought her more time with her “lungs that suck at being lungs.” At support group she meets Augustus Waters, who has lost a leg to osteosarcoma. He is struck by her sharp wit and resemblance to Natalie Portman and invites her home to watch V for Vendetta, beginning a relationship that will take them from the ICU to Amsterdam, exploring the joys and despairs of first love when there may not be a second chance. The author’s experience as a chaplain in a children’s hospital informs the story, so that it avoids the becoming maudlin, even as Hazel’s and Gus’s every dignity is stripped away by their respective cancers. An unforgettable story with more than just two unforgettable characters.

  9. Librarians adopted our social media presence way before anyone else. And the only people who watched us were either librarians or teenagers who heard about us through their librarians.

    — John Green at ALA Midwinter 2012 (via thelifeguardlibrarian)