1. Must be ALA week…

    jstor:

    Buried under swag. Send help. Chicago. Booth 2026.

    image

    I just got chills.

  2. jstor:

Oh, don’t they?

I agree with Jonathan D. Leavitt and Nocholas J.S. Christenfeld here.

    jstor:

    Oh, don’t they?

    I agree with Jonathan D. Leavitt and Nocholas J.S. Christenfeld here.

  3. JSTOR: The Great Donut vs. Doughnut Debate, 2:56pm Edition →

    jstor:

    It’s Friday, and cold and rainy, and I eat neither donuts nor doughnuts because the garbage I consume is of the chocolate variety, a preference I indulge in and celebrate daily rather than annually, and the fact that I searched “donut” rather than “doughnut” at all demonstrates the saturation of a brand I don’t even patronize but whose customers loiter near my cubicle, and the dough in doughnuts should probably be in quotation marks anyway because there’s no way that mass produced fried pastry rings comprise actual flour, and…I need more coffee, is what I’m getting at, everyone. Loads more. And chocolate. Send immediately.

    JSTOR responds to the heated Donut vs. Doughnut controversy of earlier today.

  4. Searching “Donut.”

    darienlibrary:

    jstor:

    It’s for very important research.

    Don’t mean to call you out JSTOR, but isn’t it technically spelled “doughnut?” I believe “donut” has come into common usage thanks to the Dunkin’ Donuts chain. OUP Academic, care to weigh in?

    GAUNTLET THROWN

  5. JSTOR Contest: SCOTUS Edition!

    jstor:

    Who is the only sitting justice of the Supreme Court not (yet) to have an authored article on JSTOR? (Hint but not really because you don’t know me: I saw this justice on the street one day. There was much excited squealing on my part.) To win:

    1. Follow the JSTOR Tumblr.
    2. Reply to this post with your guess.

    The first person to answer correctly gets a free JSTOR tote bag!

    Taking a brief #librariansasteenagers break to just note how cute the JSTOR tumblr is.

  6. jstor:

Storm preparations: browsing Birge Harrison’s beautiful paintings and reading about the New York blizzard of 1888.
Stay safe, everyone.

JSTOR is ON TUMBLR!

    jstor:

    Storm preparations: browsing Birge Harrison’s beautiful paintings and reading about the New York blizzard of 1888.

    Stay safe, everyone.

    JSTOR is ON TUMBLR!

  7. 
The archives of more than 1,200 journals are now available for limited free reading by the public, JSTOR announced today. Anyone can sign up for a JSTOR account and read up to three articles for free every two weeks.

From LJ, Many JSTOR Journal Archives Now Free to Public

    The archives of more than 1,200 journals are now available for limited free reading by the public, JSTOR announced today. Anyone can sign up for a JSTOR account and read up to three articles for free every two weeks.

    From LJMany JSTOR Journal Archives Now Free to Public

  8. In a Wikimedia blog post this week, Steven Walling shared news of an exciting partnership. JSTOR, that non-profit consortium-based database, beloved by high school and college students everywhere for its scholarly, authoritative content, will now provide the 100 most active Wikipedia editors with

    free access to the complete archive collections on JSTOR, including more than 1,600 academic journals, primary source documents and other works. The authors who will receive accounts have collectively written more than 100,000 Wikipedia articles to date. Access to JSTOR, which is one of the most popular sources on English Wikipedia, will allow these editors to further fill in the gaps in the sum of all human knowledge.

    — Wikipedia and JSTOR partner (via thelibrarybug)

  9. fggtlibrarian:

Xmas came early, my JSTOR swag has arrived!!

Is it weird how cool I think this JSTOR t-shirt is?

    fggtlibrarian:

    Xmas came early, my JSTOR swag has arrived!!

    Is it weird how cool I think this JSTOR t-shirt is?

  10. appsandstacks:

JSTOR Tests Free, Read-Only Access to Some Articles


It’s about to get a little easier—emphasis on “a little”—for users  without subscriptions to tap JSTOR’s enormous digital archive of journal  articles. In the coming weeks, JSTOR will make available the beta  version of a new program, Register & Read,  which will give researchers read-only access to some journal articles,  no payment required. All users have to do is to sign up for a free  “MyJSTOR” account, which will create a virtual shelf on which to store  the desired articles.


Read more…

    appsandstacks:

    JSTOR Tests Free, Read-Only Access to Some Articles

    It’s about to get a little easier—emphasis on “a little”—for users without subscriptions to tap JSTOR’s enormous digital archive of journal articles. In the coming weeks, JSTOR will make available the beta version of a new program, Register & Read, which will give researchers read-only access to some journal articles, no payment required. All users have to do is to sign up for a free “MyJSTOR” account, which will create a virtual shelf on which to store the desired articles.

    Read more

  11. Every Year, JSTOR Turns Away 150 Million Attempts to Read Journal Articles [Alexis Madrigal | The Atlantic] →

    (Source: rkjd)

  12. JSTOR makes early content free →

    fragmentsshoredagainstmyruin:

    “JSTOR, an online system for archiving academic journals, has announced it is making journal content published prior to 1923 in the United States, and prior to 1870 elsewhere, freely available to the public for reading and downloading. This includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than 200 journals, representing approximately 6% of the total content on JSTOR. Making this content freely available is a first step in a larger effort to provide more access options to independent scholars and others without access to an institutional subscription….” (JSTOR, Sept. 6 ) [text via American Libraries Direct]

    (Source: princessmeanypants)