1. oupacademic:

The shot heard round the world…
On 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, along with his wife Sophie, was assassinated in Sarajevo; by 4 August the world was at war. How did the death of one man lead to the deaths of 16 million from the trenches of northern France to the fort of Tsingtao? 
We have a timeline of events on Oxford Reference, another on our blog (also check it for some day-by-day blogging of events), and of course, the resources we’re sharing here on Tumblr .
One hundred years ago, no one knew what horrors lay ahead. Remember to wear your poppies this November and keep tumbling Great War history. 
Image credit: Heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, get into a motor car to depart from the City Hall, Sarajevo, shortly before they were assassinated by the Serbian nationalist Gavrilo WhPrincip on 28 June 1914. Imperial War Museum. IWM Non Commercial Licence via Wikimedia Commons. 

What is your library doing to commemorate the war that shaped the 20th century?

    oupacademic:

    The shot heard round the world…

    On 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, along with his wife Sophie, was assassinated in Sarajevo; by 4 August the world was at war. How did the death of one man lead to the deaths of 16 million from the trenches of northern France to the fort of Tsingtao? 

    We have a timeline of events on Oxford Reference, another on our blog (also check it for some day-by-day blogging of events), and of course, the resources we’re sharing here on Tumblr .

    One hundred years ago, no one knew what horrors lay ahead. Remember to wear your poppies this November and keep tumbling Great War history. 

    Image credit: Heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, get into a motor car to depart from the City Hall, Sarajevo, shortly before they were assassinated by the Serbian nationalist Gavrilo WhPrincip on 28 June 1914. Imperial War Museum. IWM Non Commercial Licence via Wikimedia Commons. 

    What is your library doing to commemorate the war that shaped the 20th century?

  2. A Library Where the Hush Is Over Its Very Existence →

    jefflambert:

    image

    This is the entrance to the City Hall Library, open to all yet known to relatively few and visible to just about no one. “I didn’t even know this was here. Is it open to the public?” Ydanis Rodriguez, a City Council member from Manhattan, asked as he recently entered it for the first time, even though it is a short walk from his offices.

    Relative obscurity is nothing new for this institution, which is actually housed inside the Surrogate’s Court building. It is over 100 years old, but in July 1898, The New York Times wrote of its predecessor, a hodgepodge of a library inside City Hall, “There are not many who know of its existence, and few who have heard of it know of its location.” An apt description for the current library, too.

    Seems silly that a landmark designation is standing in the way of even the most basic signage. Access is a right!

    I am pro-clear signage and pro-awesome websites.

  3. chasing-yesterdays:

    Medieval depictions of Cancer the Crab by artists who had possibly never actually seen a crab:

    1) Detail from the floor of a twelve-legged owl-faced crab at Canterbury Cathedral, UK. Eerily reminiscent of the plastic “cootie” contained in the children’s game of the same name.

    2) MSS, unsourced by author of original post, depicting a particularly disturbing crab with a human face and a furry tail. And a nosebleed.

    3) Stone medallion above door-arch, Cathedrale St-Lazare, Burgundy, showing a crab that resembles an unholy love triangle between a pig, a duck, and a snapping turtle.

    That last crab.

  4. missrumphiusproject:

    journeytothepast2013:

    Printing Office Press Room - Colonial Williamsburg

    Colonial Williamsburg is on Tumblr. Please excuse me while I revert to childhood for a moment.

     Animated Gif on Giphy

  5. thepinakes:

    uispeccoll:

    No gifs today since I was busy being ON THE NEWS!?  What?

    Kathrine Moermond, the Education and Outreach Coordinator for the Old Capital Museum and I, made a 19th century recipe for Marlborough Pie from a handwritten cookbook in the Szathmary Culinary Collection, transcribed through DIY History.  It just so happens the handwritten cookbook was from Alice Eleckta Pickard who was the daughter of the third president of the University of Iowa, Josiah LIttle Pickard. 

    You can make this recipe for our historic cooking contest at the Iowa State Fair! (see pg. 53 of the pdf in the link).

    Best library outreach ever?

    Seconded.

  6. ala-annual:

    Congressman John Lewis at ALA Annual Conference

    For more video coverage on Annual, click here.

  7. gov-info:

LOC Gov Doc: 10 Resources for Community Digital Archives 
"We write frequently on this blog about the value of personal digital archiving–empowering people to pass on digital memories to their families and others. We’ve always seen public libraries as key allies in promoting personal archiving, and have highlighted libraries that undertake outreach and training in this area.
There is a related role for public libraries and allied organizations: facilitating development of community digital archives. A community collection could consist of born-digital and digitized images, audio, text or other cultural heritage materials that document local history. Community members use the collection to get a deeper understanding of their location, and people often are eager to donate their own personal materials.
This is an approach that has been gaining ground over the last few years. The American Library Association recently suggested that public libraries consider digital special collections as a strategic option in planning for the future.
Here, in no special order, are 10 resources that provide useful insight into developing, managing and accessing community digital archives.
Digital Public Library of America Digital Hubs Program, “A national network out of the over forty state/regional digital libraries and myriad large digital libraries in the US, bringing together digitized content from across the country into a single access point for end users, and an open platform for developers.”
Houston Area Digital Archives. Accessed via the Internet Archives, “the Houston Area Digital Archives provides open, online access to the rich collections of the Houston Public Library and other community archives.”
Denver Public Library, Creating Your Community. “The Denver Public Library’s mission is to connect people with information, ideas and experiences to provide enjoyment, enrich lives and strengthen our community. The Creating Your Community project was developed to engage the community to share and connect with their history in new ways using technology, partnerships and outreach programming.”
Arlington County (Va.) Public Library, Arlington Community Archive. Collection of historical documents that narrate the history of Arlington County, its citizens, organizations, and social issues. Researchers can find personal papers, photographs, and archival records of local organizations, clubs, and associations.
Community Archives and Heritage Group.   A national group which aims to support and promote community archives in the UK and Ireland. The site provides an extensive list of advice and guidance, as well as a directory of individual archives.
Jones Public Library, Amherst, MA, Digital Amherst. “Brings our Town’s history alive through a collection of images, multimedia, and documents that reflect the independent spirit of our people, creative works, and culture.”
START AN ARCHIVES! ”A blog about the trials and tribulations of starting a community archives,” by an archivist in Philadelphia, Pa.
Hershey (Pa.) Community Archives. “All the partners recognized that… Hershey’s historical record was at risk. Today the Archives serves as a corporate archives to The Hershey Company, Hershey Trust Company and Hershey Entertainment and Resorts Company while also serving as a repository for community and local organizations’ records.”
History Grand Rapids.org. ”It is the plan of the Grand Rapids Historical Commission to collect images from the personal collections of local families, local archives of public and private institutions and organizations, and other local sources that reflect and reveal family and community life and the ways in which Grand Rapids people worked, traveled, educated and enjoyed themselves from the mid-nineteenth through the twentieth century.”
The Mass. Memories Road Show at UMass Boston. “An event-based public history project that digitizes family photos and memories shared by the people of Massachusetts. University Archives staff work with local planning teams to organize free public events where residents are invited to bring family photos to be scanned and included in this digital archive.”
by Bill LeFurgy, Library of Congress Digital Signals

    gov-info:

    LOC Gov Doc: 10 Resources for Community Digital Archives

    "We write frequently on this blog about the value of personal digital archiving–empowering people to pass on digital memories to their families and others. We’ve always seen public libraries as key allies in promoting personal archiving, and have highlighted libraries that undertake outreach and training in this area.

    There is a related role for public libraries and allied organizations: facilitating development of community digital archives. A community collection could consist of born-digital and digitized images, audio, text or other cultural heritage materials that document local history. Community members use the collection to get a deeper understanding of their location, and people often are eager to donate their own personal materials.

    This is an approach that has been gaining ground over the last few years. The American Library Association recently suggested that public libraries consider digital special collections as a strategic option in planning for the future.

    Here, in no special order, are 10 resources that provide useful insight into developing, managing and accessing community digital archives.

    Digital Public Library of America Digital Hubs Program, “A national network out of the over forty state/regional digital libraries and myriad large digital libraries in the US, bringing together digitized content from across the country into a single access point for end users, and an open platform for developers.”

    Houston Area Digital Archives. Accessed via the Internet Archives, “the Houston Area Digital Archives provides open, online access to the rich collections of the Houston Public Library and other community archives.”

    Denver Public Library, Creating Your Community. “The Denver Public Library’s mission is to connect people with information, ideas and experiences to provide enjoyment, enrich lives and strengthen our community. The Creating Your Community project was developed to engage the community to share and connect with their history in new ways using technology, partnerships and outreach programming.”

    Arlington County (Va.) Public Library, Arlington Community Archive. Collection of historical documents that narrate the history of Arlington County, its citizens, organizations, and social issues. Researchers can find personal papers, photographs, and archival records of local organizations, clubs, and associations.

    Community Archives and Heritage Group.   A national group which aims to support and promote community archives in the UK and Ireland. The site provides an extensive list of advice and guidance, as well as a directory of individual archives.

    Jones Public Library, Amherst, MA, Digital Amherst. “Brings our Town’s history alive through a collection of images, multimedia, and documents that reflect the independent spirit of our people, creative works, and culture.”

    START AN ARCHIVES! ”A blog about the trials and tribulations of starting a community archives,” by an archivist in Philadelphia, Pa.

    Hershey (Pa.) Community Archives. “All the partners recognized that… Hershey’s historical record was at risk. Today the Archives serves as a corporate archives to The Hershey Company, Hershey Trust Company and Hershey Entertainment and Resorts Company while also serving as a repository for community and local organizations’ records.”

    History Grand Rapids.org. ”It is the plan of the Grand Rapids Historical Commission to collect images from the personal collections of local families, local archives of public and private institutions and organizations, and other local sources that reflect and reveal family and community life and the ways in which Grand Rapids people worked, traveled, educated and enjoyed themselves from the mid-nineteenth through the twentieth century.”

    The Mass. Memories Road Show at UMass Boston. “An event-based public history project that digitizes family photos and memories shared by the people of Massachusetts. University Archives staff work with local planning teams to organize free public events where residents are invited to bring family photos to be scanned and included in this digital archive.”

  8. smithsonianlibraries:

The Libraries gets a puter! Look at us back in 1984. We’ve aged well.

Aww Smithsonian.

    smithsonianlibraries:

    The Libraries gets a puter! Look at us back in 1984. We’ve aged well.

    Aww Smithsonian.

  9. Libraries in the Byzantine Empire →

    oupacademic:

    Today is the first day of ALA Annual and in celebration of the event we have been making a new article from Oxford Handbooks Online freely available each day this week. Today’s article is an account of libraries in the Byzantine Empire, particularly highlighting public libraries, which were a fixture of many towns.

    Check back tomorrow for another article and stop by the OUP booth on Saturday, June 29, 2-3pm, for a special presentation on the evolution of the Oxford Handbooks program.

    Hello historical public libraries! Hello Byzantium!

  10. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: Remembering Aimé Césaire →

    schomburgcenter:

    image

    Today we remember Aimé Césaire, a leading advocate in black consciousness and one of the founders of the literary and ideological movement of Negritude — black consciousness and pride.

    Poet, writer, politician and anti-colonial activist Aimé Césaire was born on June 26, 1913, in Basse-Pointe, Martinique. Mr. Césaire attended high school and college in France, and in 1937 he married another student from Martinique, Suzanne Roussi.

    The Caribbean island of Martinique is administratively and politically a region of France and its citizens are French citizens. Césaire served as mayor of Fort-de-France, the capital city, and was elected representative of Martinique from 1945-2001.

    Césaire’s contributions to Francophone literature are invaluable in the the cultivation of awareness and pride in Black African/ African diaspora cultures. Césaire was a voice for the voiceless, and was considered as a mentor by many including the revolutionary writer, psychiatrist, and philosopher Frantz Fanon. Césaire’s works espoused on themes that are universal and humanizing such as this excerpt from his famous work, a surrealist poem entitled “Cahier d’un retour au pays natal” - translated as “Notebook of a Return to the Native Land”:

    I would go to this land of mine and I would say to it:

    Embrace me without fear…

    And if all I can do is speak, it is for you I should speak.

    The Schomburg Center just gets me.

  11. Early American Libraries →

    oupacademic:

    Heading out to ALA Annual at the end of the week? In celebration of the upcoming conference, Oxford Handbooks Online will be freeing up a new library-related review article every day this week for our favorite tumblarians. We are kicking off today with an article on the history of libraries in early American society.

    Check back tomorrow for another article and stop by the OUP booth on Saturday, June 29 from 2:00-3:00 p.m. for a special presentation on the evolution of the Oxford Handbooks program by publisher Damon Zucca. 

  12. chicadificil:

    Look what I get to catalog today! The photos in this book are amazing!

  13. schomburgcenter:

    Today is Juneteenth, which commemorates the ending of slavery in Texas on June 19, 1865. Although the Emancipation Proclamation was issued by Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, it was not enforced in the state of Texas due to a lack of Union troop presence and enforcement in the confederate state.

    However on June 19, 1865, Union soldiers led by Major General Gordon Granger and his regiment  entered Galveston, Texas to override the resistance to the law and to enforce the Executive Orders. Union Major-General Gordon Granger read General Orders, No.3 to the people of Galveston. It stated:

    “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.”

    Since 1865 black Americans have regarded June 19th as the official emancipation day, and on January 1, 1980, the state of Texas proclaimed June 19 an official state holiday thanks to the African American state legislator Al Edwards.

    Should be a national holiday, I think! Happy Juneteenth!

  14. SCHOMBURG CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN BLACK CULTURE: Historical Tribute: Medgar Evers →

    schomburgcenter:

    Today marks the 50th Anniversary of civil rights activist Medgar Evers’ death on June 12, 1963. To commemorate Medgar Evers’ legacy we offer the inspirational song “Mississippi Goddam” created by Nina Simone following Evers’ assassination.  Evers’ life and death played a significant role in the civil rights movement to end Jim Crow laws.  After serving in WWII war, Evers returned to the U.S.,  a segregated society where blacks were treated inferiorly, which led him to commit his life to the empowerment of black people on  a grassroots level working for the NAACP. His legacy is memorialized from the naming of educational institution after him, Medgar Evers College, in Brooklyn, New York, to the naming of a U.S. navy cargo ship in his honor—USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE-13), to songs by the musicians Nina Simone, Bob Dylan, and Phil Ochs , to television series and books. Join the Schomburg in commemorating Medgar Evers by sharing his legacy.

  15. astronautwivesclub:

Humbled by this Starred Library Journal review for The Astronaut Wives Club! “An exceptional story that…will hold vast appeal for armchair historians” etc.

    astronautwivesclub:

    Humbled by this Starred Library Journal review for The Astronaut Wives Club! “An exceptional story that…will hold vast appeal for armchair historians” etc.