1. The 3M Content Acquisition Tool (CAT) (launching in April) now provides featured book lists created by Heather McCormack (Former LJ Book Review Editor). Imagine “if you liked The Hunger Games, try these.” The CAT now offers a save search feature, multiple shopping carts, improved searching capabilities, and eISBN searching as well.

    — 

    Sue Polanka (the fine mind behind the must-read librarian tech blog No Shelf Required) in her 2013 Midwinter ALA update about ebook vendors, including 3M. 

    This spring, I’m going to talk at length with Polanka about our super-powered, hyper-intuitive new selection tool, dubbed CAT. It will launch in April, and if you were able to attend Midwinter in Seattle, you likely saw a demo and jumped with glee (“Finally, a piece of library tech that helps, not hinders me!”). If you missed the show, no worries; we are offering web demos.

    Ping me if you want a sneak peek of a tool that will make all of our lives easier.

    (via cloudunbound)

    FYI!

  2. cloundunbound:

NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS VS. THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE: Awards are taking up a lot of mental real estate these days. Library Journal’s editors, headed by Etta Thornton-Verma (@ettathornton), announced last week that they have settled on their Best Books short lists and will publish the first installment, including the Top Ten, in the LJ Reviews e-newsletter on November 15 (2011 winners here). LJ Assistant Editor Molly McArdle (@mollitudo) tweeted, “Of our 19-book shortlist, 12 titles are by women, 10 are nonfiction, and 3 first appeared on the Internet in some form.”
My Giller post today reminded me of a recent Twitter conversation I had with two librarians, Stephanie Chase and Amy Watts, about the sales impact of the NBAs and the Bookers, a topic begging for a meaty post. Takers apply here.

Former (& in our hearts, eternal) Editor, LJ Book Review, Heather McCormack chews on some observations from librarians on the importance of literary awards.

    cloundunbound:

    NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS VS. THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE: Awards are taking up a lot of mental real estate these days. Library Journal’s editors, headed by Etta Thornton-Verma (@ettathornton), announced last week that they have settled on their Best Books short lists and will publish the first installment, including the Top Ten, in the LJ Reviews e-newsletter on November 15 (2011 winners here). LJ Assistant Editor Molly McArdle (@mollitudo) tweeted, “Of our 19-book shortlist, 12 titles are by women, 10 are nonfiction, and 3 first appeared on the Internet in some form.”

    My Giller post today reminded me of a recent Twitter conversation I had with two librarians, Stephanie Chase and Amy Watts, about the sales impact of the NBAs and the Bookers, a topic begging for a meaty post. Takers apply here.

    Former (& in our hearts, eternal) Editor, LJ Book Review, Heather McCormack chews on some observations from librarians on the importance of literary awards.

  3. LBF is decidedly not a show that acknowledges the role of libraries in the publishing ecosystem or encourages their further involvement. It also has nothing to do with books in the sense that there are nil gratis galleys stacked in towers for easy grabbing by librarians, journalists, and other taste makers. Prepublication word of mouth does not rate as a goal as it always does at Book ExpoAmerica, a bizarre concept for a book review editor to digest. That publishers have desirable content is taken for granted—as is that you already own enough damn tote bags.

    — LJ Book Review Editor Heather McCormack on the London Book Fair.

  4. PLA has been my favorite library conference since I attended my first in 2010. I relished the show’s focus—the granularity and prescriptiveness of its sessions; the moxie and optimism of its presenters. I bonded with a group of Connecticut librarians I now call friends, and I met a future Multnomah County mover who would become my surrogate mother, all while soaking up the weirdy beardy energizing Zen of Portland, our host city.

    This year’s conference in Philadelphia made a vastly different impression. Maybe it was my own fatigue from weighing the ebook question, but I detected a friction among public librarians that wasn’t present out West two years ago. My schedule mixed sessions about readers’ advisory (RA) with digital migraines, and as I moved from one to the next, two camps took shape: those pros and parapros who believe popular books remain public libraries’ leading brand and that the face-to-face, librarian-patron interaction is at the core of library services, and the technologists who argue that survival depends on being able to code—literally—library infrastructure and publish content independent of established houses.

    — Heather McCormack sums up last week’s PLA with Exquisite Informational Immersion: Fusing the Visions of Readers’ Advisory and Technologist Librarians.