1. schomburgcenter:

    To see Josephine Baker’s dance sequence skip to 2:27.  Happy Spring!

    JOSEPHINE. A million times yes.

  2. mydaguerreotypelibrarian:

Writer and bad-ass librarian, Regina M. Anderson helped jumpstart the Harlem Renaissance. From Wikipedia:

Born in Chicago, she studied at Wilberforce University, University of Chicago, and Columbia University before becoming a librarian at the 135th Street (Harlem) branch of the New York Public Library. In 1924 she organized a dinner for black New York intellectuals and writers, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen, and Langston Hughes. The dinner was one of the coalescing events of the Harlem Renaissance.


Um, so, yes I actually did this.

    mydaguerreotypelibrarian:

    Writer and bad-ass librarian, Regina M. Anderson helped jumpstart the Harlem Renaissance. From Wikipedia:

    Born in Chicago, she studied at Wilberforce UniversityUniversity of Chicago, and Columbia University before becoming a librarian at the 135th Street (Harlem) branch of the New York Public Library. In 1924 she organized a dinner for black New York intellectuals and writers, including W. E. B. Du BoisJean ToomerCountee Cullen, and Langston Hughes. The dinner was one of the coalescing events of the Harlem Renaissance.

    Um, so, yes I actually did this.

  3. A new novel by Harlem Renaissance luminary Claude McKay has been discovered.
McKay, also a poet, was the first black American to write a best-selling novel, his 1928 Home to Harlem. The previously unknown manuscript is a satire of Harlem during the Great Depression. Tremendously exciting news!

    A new novel by Harlem Renaissance luminary Claude McKay has been discovered.

    McKay, also a poet, was the first black American to write a best-selling novel, his 1928 Home to Harlem. The previously unknown manuscript is a satire of Harlem during the Great Depression. Tremendously exciting news!