1. I always love a headline that presumes to inform an entire profession about what else it could be doing. Because librarians aren’t doing much of anything out there—no programs, no reader’s advisory, no stretching dollars, no research or reference requests, no accommodations of the public and community… This may get a little more ranty than I usually am on this blog, but reading the second part of this post from David Vinjamuri at Forbes (“Why Public Libraries Matter: And How They Can Do More”) got my hackles up in so many ways.

    — Books, Yarn, Ink and Other Pursuits: What Public Libraries Could Do: Besides Everything That They Are Already Doing

  2. 
danhickey:
According to Forbes.com Library and information science is the number one worst master’s degree for jobs, with low mid-career median pay ($57,600) and an abysmal projected employment increase (8.5%). A bleak look at the state of the profession for outsiders, but probably not surprising for career-minded library professionals.
If you can believe it, Forbes’ numbers are slightly more optimistic than the Occupational Outlook Handbook’s: $54,500 median pay (in 2010) and 7% (slower than average) growth 2010-20.
Forbes on how they calculated their figures:
To find the mid-career median pay for 35 popular degrees, we turned to Payscale.com, which lets users compare their salaries with those of other people in similar jobs by culling real-time salary data from its 35 million profiles. We then looked at the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ employment projection data to see how fast employment was expected to increase between 2010 and 2020 in popular jobs held by people with each degree. Finally we averaged each degree’s pay rank and estimated growth rank to find the best and worst master’s degrees for jobs.
Screenshot, stats, and quote via Forbes.com. Supplementary stats via OOH. 

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    danhickey:

    According to Forbes.com Library and information science is the number one worst master’s degree for jobs, with low mid-career median pay ($57,600) and an abysmal projected employment increase (8.5%). A bleak look at the state of the profession for outsiders, but probably not surprising for career-minded library professionals.

    If you can believe it, Forbes’ numbers are slightly more optimistic than the Occupational Outlook Handbook’s: $54,500 median pay (in 2010) and 7% (slower than average) growth 2010-20.

    Forbes on how they calculated their figures:

    To find the mid-career median pay for 35 popular degrees, we turned to Payscale.com, which lets users compare their salaries with those of other people in similar jobs by culling real-time salary data from its 35 million profiles. We then looked at the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ employment projection data to see how fast employment was expected to increase between 2010 and 2020 in popular jobs held by people with each degree. Finally we averaged each degree’s pay rank and estimated growth rank to find the best and worst master’s degrees for jobs.

    Screenshot, stats, and quote via Forbes.com. Supplementary stats via OOH

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  3. Amazon Commits Rare Strategic Blunder Using Brilliant Tactic

    From Forbes:

    A promotion from Amazon on December 10, 2011 gave customers 5% off (up to $5.00) on up to three qualifying items.  The location feature on smartphones makes it feasible to make discounts available only if the customer checks the price of the goods on the Price Check app while at a physical store carrying the goods.

    Without spending a dime, Amazon gets price comparison data, turning customers into unpaid spies. As a tactic it is brilliant to let customers do the work.