1. Digital Public Library of America and Brooklyn Public Library Launch Tumblr Blogs →

    New Tumblr blogs from the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) and the Digital Public Library of America are now online.

    The DPLA Tumblr blog is currently online (subscribe now) but the first post will not go live until next Tuesday (Feb. 11, 2013).

    The BPL blog has been online for the past couple of weeks and feature “treasures” from the library’s Brooklyn Collection.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  2. Digital Public Library of America » Blog Archive » Job Opportunity: Director of Technology →

    willywaldo:

    laura-in-libraryland:

    The DPLA is hiring!

    Cool gig for you library techies!

  3. DPLA Launches, Librarians Respond →

    Check out what LJ Technology Editor Matt Enis was able to dig up about DPLA’s recent launch!

  4. What is the DPLA? | Library Journal

There are two key points about what the DPLA “is,” at least as of April 2013. First, the DPLA will be what we, the people, decide to make of it, as a shared, public-spirited resource. Second, the DPLA is the community of people who have devoted themselves (ourselves, in fact) to pursuing an ambitious, public-spirited vision of what the future might hold. On day one, we will present a radically open platform that will make a lot of exciting material available more broadly, as well as a lot of code and services with which technologists can do interesting things. On day one, the DPLA will have an extraordinary founding executive director in place, Dan Cohen [see also a recent Q&A with Cohen just after his appointment—Ed.], and a diverse, dedicated group of volunteers who have contributed their time, energy, and attention to the topic of creating a digital public library for the United States. Over time, the DPLA will grow into an essential partner to libraries, archives, and museums, as well as those who rely upon them. The form that the DPLA will take in five, ten, 20 years? That’s up to all of us. And the best is yet to come.

    What is the DPLA? | Library Journal

    There are two key points about what the DPLA “is,” at least as of April 2013. First, the DPLA will be what we, the people, decide to make of it, as a shared, public-spirited resource. Second, the DPLA is the community of people who have devoted themselves (ourselves, in fact) to pursuing an ambitious, public-spirited vision of what the future might hold. On day one, we will present a radically open platform that will make a lot of exciting material available more broadly, as well as a lot of code and services with which technologists can do interesting things. On day one, the DPLA will have an extraordinary founding executive director in place, Dan Cohen [see also a recent Q&A with Cohen just after his appointment—Ed.], and a diverse, dedicated group of volunteers who have contributed their time, energy, and attention to the topic of creating a digital public library for the United States. Over time, the DPLA will grow into an essential partner to libraries, archives, and museums, as well as those who rely upon them. The form that the DPLA will take in five, ten, 20 years? That’s up to all of us. And the best is yet to come.

  5. Now, With No Further Ado, We Present … the Digital Public Library of America! - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic

The idea behind the Digital Public Library of America is fairly simple actually — it is the attempt, really a large-scale attempt, to knit together America’s archives, libraries, and museums, which have a tremendous amount of content — all forms of human expression, from images and photographs, to artwork, to published material and unpublished material, like archival and special collections. We want to bring that all together in one place.

    Now, With No Further Ado, We Present … the Digital Public Library of America! - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic

    The idea behind the Digital Public Library of America is fairly simple actually — it is the attempt, really a large-scale attempt, to knit together America’s archives, libraries, and museums, which have a tremendous amount of content — all forms of human expression, from images and photographs, to artwork, to published material and unpublished material, like archival and special collections. We want to bring that all together in one place.

  6. What’s your first impression of the DPLA?
Although the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) launched event in Boston was cancelled, the debut of its online portal today at noon ET went ahead as planned.
We’re looking to hear from librarians and users out there about their first impressions—how does the DPLA portal unveiled today strike you?
We’d love to get your take to incorporate into our coverage of the portal launch.
Either let us know in the comments what you think of the DPLA portal, or feel free to email LJ’s Technology Editor, Matt Enis, at menis@mediasourceinc.com.

    What’s your first impression of the DPLA?

    Although the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) launched event in Boston was cancelled, the debut of its online portal today at noon ET went ahead as planned.

    We’re looking to hear from librarians and users out there about their first impressions—how does the DPLA portal unveiled today strike you?

    We’d love to get your take to incorporate into our coverage of the portal launch.

    Either let us know in the comments what you think of the DPLA portal, or feel free to email LJ’s Technology Editor, Matt Enis, at menis@mediasourceinc.com.

  7. Copyright laws could exclude everything published after 1964, most works published after 1923, and some that go back as far as 1873. Court cases during the last few months have opened up the possibility that the fair use provision of the copyright act of 1976 could be extended to make more recent books available for certain purposes, such as service to the visually impaired and some forms of teaching. And if, as expected, the DPLA excludes books that are still selling on the market (most exhaust their commercial viability within a few years), authors and publishers might grant the exercise of their rights to the DPLA.

    — 

    Robert Darnton, director of the Harvard University Library, in his hot-off-the-presses essay “The Digital Public Library of America Is Launched!,” in The New York Review of Books.

    I’ve excerpted the above paragraph because it’s Darnton’s way of addressing the initial exclusion of any commercially produced content, that is, novels, for one. This has been a criticism of the DPLA since its inception a few years ago. How can any library be “public” in name without the kinds of books that drive circulation? to put it another way.

    What is your take on the DPLA, public librarians? 

    (via cloudunbound)

    We’re listening! What do you think?

  8. The National Digital Public Library Is Launched! →

    thelifeguardlibrarian:

    darnton_1-042513

    The Digital Public Library of America, to be launched on April 18, is a project to make the holdings of America’s research libraries, archives, and museums available to all Americans—and eventually to everyone in the world—online and free of charge.

    Robert Darnton tells you how and why.

  9. The DPLA will provide a single place to discover and explore our country’s libraries, archives, and museums, a portal, and so will bring entirely new audiences to formerly scattered collections.

    Moreover, we will provide the means for others to use information about those holdings in creative and transformative ways, a platform, with an API, for others to build upon.

    Third, we will endeavor to work with public and academic libraries to try to solve some of the thorny issues that plague our current research and reading environment.

    — 

    Dan Cohen, newly announced founding executive director of the Digital Public Library of America, in Library Journal’s Q&A.

    I am most curious about the first aim. That’s what you call a logistical nightmare. 

    (via cloudunbound)

  10. hadro:

We are literally hacking together bits of a potential Digital Public Library of America #dpla (at Chattanooga Public Library)

LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro is holding it down in Tennessee for DPLA’s Appfest.

    hadro:

    We are literally hacking together bits of a potential Digital Public Library of America #dpla (at Chattanooga Public Library)

    LJ Executive Editor Josh Hadro is holding it down in Tennessee for DPLA’s Appfest.