1. Five Great Things Libraries Are Doing With Old Books | LJ Insider

    Library book sales (and their descendants, such as Better World Books) are a great institution, but they’re not the only thing libraries can do—or help their patrons do—with obsolete titles besides the dumpster. Here are five creative reuses from real libraries.

    1. Turning them into New Books

      In Richmond, VA, The People’s Library is a collaborative art project to create 100 handmade books of personal history. The Richmond Public Library helped collect discarded books to be recycled into paper, then bound into books with prompts inside them. They’ll be added to the library’s permanent collection, and patrons can check them out and respond to the prompts.

    2. Turning them into Art

      In Bath, England, the library found a new use for weeded books that don’t sell. Patrons collect a book and turn it into an art contest entrywith the help, if they like, of a series of library workshops. The resulting art projects are exhibited at the central library and online and the public votes for their favorites; the winner in each category receives a free ereader.

    3. Fixing Them

      For 40 years, Georgia’s Hall County Library System has partnered with the National Library Bindery to restore old books and Biblesbelonging to library patrons. Repairs take about two months, and patrons are charged for the service.

    4. Turning Them Into Furniture

      An oldie but a goodie: a reference desk made of books in a Dutch library.

    5. Turning Them into Fundraisers

      Recycled Reads, the Austin Public Library’s used bookstore, upcycles old books and media into crafts and sells the results.

  2. chicagopubliclibrary:

Closet Transformed Into A Book Nook

Excuse me while I fan myself.

    chicagopubliclibrary:

    Closet Transformed Into A Book Nook

    Excuse me while I fan myself.

  3. darienlibrary:

Last year, Chad Harbach’s divisive baseball bildungsroman The Art of Fielding had its title curlicued across the front, like the franchise name on an old-style home-team jersey; meanwhile, Pulitzer Prize winner Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot introduced itself to the world in a disarmingly dressed-down fashion, its name hurriedly jotted down over a comic-book graphic of a wedding band.
(via Book Cover Clones: Why Do So Many Recent Novels Look Alike? - Ashley Fetters - The Atlantic)

    darienlibrary:

    Last year, Chad Harbach’s divisive baseball bildungsroman The Art of Fielding had its title curlicued across the front, like the franchise name on an old-style home-team jersey; meanwhile, Pulitzer Prize winner Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot introduced itself to the world in a disarmingly dressed-down fashion, its name hurriedly jotted down over a comic-book graphic of a wedding band.

    (via Book Cover Clones: Why Do So Many Recent Novels Look Alike? - Ashley Fetters - The Atlantic)

  4. Book Deal of the Day:

    rachelfershleiser:

    “New York Public Library Rare Books Librarian Jessica Pigza’s HANDMADE AT THE LIBRARY, in which readers will learn how to use the riches of libraries, both online and off, to inspire all manner of craft/design/DIY endeavors…”

    YES YES YES YES YES YES YES!

  5. A beautiful new library designed by David Adjaye opened in Southeast DC last week. The Francis A. Gregory Library has space for 80,000 books, DVDs, CDs and other materials. Read more from the Washington Post.

    A beautiful new library designed by David Adjaye opened in Southeast DC last week. The Francis A. Gregory Library has space for 80,000 books, DVDs, CDs and other materials. Read more from the Washington Post.

  6. theatlantic:

Giving ‘Great Expectations’ a Redesign … 70 Times
When London-based graphic designer Lucienne Roberts and design educator Rebecca Wright asked 70 international graphic designers to reimagine the first page of chapter one of Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, their expectations were, well, great. So was the resulting work.
Read more. [Image: Richard Hubert Smith]

    theatlantic:

    Giving ‘Great Expectations’ a Redesign … 70 Times

    When London-based graphic designer Lucienne Roberts and design educator Rebecca Wright asked 70 international graphic designers to reimagine the first page of chapter one of Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, their expectations were, well, great. So was the resulting work.

    Read more. [Image: Richard Hubert Smith]

  7. From Roy Tennant’s Digital Libraries, The Scarcity of Imagination:

    In a nutshell, the author of the post (Bret Victor) was pointing out how beggarly this vision was. All it did was extrapolate out from where we are now — and not very far, either. This future world is offers mostly finger-swiping on flatscreens. Sure, you could swipe things from one device to another, like from a phone to a flat panel display on a wall, but that’s no big innovation. This, he posits, is nothing more than pictures under glass.