1. darienlibrary:

    "I Have a Dream" 50th Anniversary

    To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech during the march on Washington for jobs and freedom, Darien Library staff members all got together to recite his famous speech.

  2. Programming Unconference Northeast →

    darienlibrary:

    I’d like to take a break from our regularly scheduled book/Connecticut/libraries tumblr-ing to invite librarians and library professionals with the ability to travel to Darien, CT to a programming unconference this September.

    Over sushi in Seattle, Janie Hermann (Princeton Public Library) and I were talking about how it would be cool to organize a little “unconference” for programming librarians to network, share ideas, and learn from one another. Then we got Andy on board and he wouldn’t stop bugging me.

    Hence, Programming Unconference Northeast was born!

    The stats:

    • This unconference is completely free and lunch will be provided. You only need to pay for your travel.
    • Lisa Carlucci Thomas will deliver the keynote.
    • You can register here and if you’re feeling really sassy, start adding your break out session ideas to the Google Doc spreadsheet.

    Please reblog and share with all your librarians who may be interested! We thought this would be a good professional development opportunity especially for those who do not attend the national conferences.

    Get. It.

  3. Erin Shea: “I don’t know about you but I’m pretty sick of BEA. I got in line to see Julianne Moore and it was a pretty long line but, you know, I’m pretty determined and I have my laser fingers to keep me company, but I’ve been back and forth to Staten Island fifty-seven times now and all I ate today was fifteen bags of roasted nuts and I’m beginning to think maybe it’s not worth it? Where’s the line for the cat?

    — 

    Won’t someone think of the BEA orphans? | MobyLives

    "I have my laser fingers to keep me company.”

  4. bookavore:

Readers’ advisory practice

So cool.

    bookavore:

    Readers’ advisory practice

    So cool.

  5. darienlibrary:

If you IM the library on a Friday afternoon you may be forced to experience my humor jokes.

The best.

    darienlibrary:

    If you IM the library on a Friday afternoon you may be forced to experience my humor jokes.

    The best.

  6. cloudunbound:


I’ve spent a goodly amount of February shining a giant pink light on Cloud partner Harlequin (see my overview of its series, Harlequin’s quick-and-dirty guide to erotica, and Cloud librarian Maureen Roberts’s interview with KISS author Kelly Hunter). Before the month of love and eros slips away, romance fans and publishing pundits of all platforms should, if they haven’t already, meet Angela James, executive editor of Harlequin’s digital-first, DRM-free imprint, Carina Press. 
Below is Cloud librarian Erin Shea’s scintillating email conversation with James (pictured above, with e-reader in hand), who lives and dies by her intimate, enviable connection with the romance audience. She’s also a believer in the library as discovery center and holds forth with ten years of digital publishing experience on the relationship among word of mouth, digital marketing, libraries, and sales.

ES: Carina Press is a “digital-first, DRM free” imprint of Harlequin. Would you explain what this means for library users downloading your ebooks?
AJ: This actually means very positive things for library users, because Carina Press has chosen not to put DRM, or Digital Rights Management, on our titles, including those bought by libraries. This means library users can easily move the files they check out from the library to their device of choice. I have had a number of librarians tell me that, because of this, they often use Carina Press titles to demonstrate to patrons how to move files to a device, because we make it quite painless.
ES: Your imprint primarily publishes genre fiction. Do you think genre fans consume their reading in a way that makes a DRM-free business model more sustainable than, say, nonfiction?
AJ: I don’t consider myself an expert on the nonfiction market or its consumers, so it’s difficult to answer this question with any confidence. Anecdotally, I’ve heard many nonfiction publishers, especially textbook publishers, say DRM free is a nonstarter in their part of the industry. On the other hand, I’ve also heard fiction publishers say that.
On the fiction side, I think some of the hesitation from publishers comes not just from the publishers and their concerns with reader usage of DRM-free material, but also from the pressure they get from some authors and agents to continue the use of DRM because of their concerns with reader usage.
ES: Carina Press caters to niche and emerging reader markets. Do you worry about customers finishing a title and then passing it on digitally to a friend for free? Or do you see this as a way to build word of mouth?
AJ: Yes, I do see it as a way to build word of mouth. I’m going to use myself as an example. I’m an avid reader; in 2012, I read between 410-420 books. In short, I’m a publisher’s dream come true! But despite the fact that I’m willing to spend several thousand dollars a year on books, I still encounter many that I’d like to read but am hesitant to purchase because I’m uncertain of the author’s writing ability, storytelling ability, or whether I can trust her or him with plot elements. 
Being able to get the book from a friend (or a library!) allows me to experiment with authors, stories, and even genres I wouldn’t otherwise try. Because of the wide availability of books to choose from, if borrowing the book by some legitimate means isn’t available to me, I simply skip it. However, if I am able to borrow it, and enjoy it, I am willing in the future to become a paying customer of that author. If the author has a preexisting backlist, I’ll invest in the backlist.
I don’t think I’m that unique in this regard (perhaps unique in how much I read but not unique in wanting to be cautious of where I choose to spend my reading dollars).
ES: Ebook discovery is a hot topic in Library Land. Browsing a digital collection is an inherently different experience than perusing a physical bookshelf. Because of this, librarians are constantly thinking about how they can streamline ebook discovery. How do you market your digital-first titles to new audiences?
AJ: In many ways, digital-first marketing is much the same as marketing print. We advertise in key online places, as well as experiment with niche online places. We do etailer co-ops, seek out reviews, send newsletters, engage with our audience in social media channels, etc. But with the rise of digital and the rise of the reader also being online, we’re seeing how important word of mouth along with the right pricing strategy is. But if a title can generate excellent word of mouth, that’s the most valuable marketing! 
ES: Would you be open to a library purchasing Carina Press ebooks and then assigning their own in-house DRM to those titles?
AJ: You know, that’s something no one has ever asked me before. It’s a larger business decision, so we’d definitely be open to a discussion on the pros and cons of this. It would be a fascinating discussion!
ES: You are a self-proclaimed advocate for digital publishing; how does your point of view influence your stance on ebook lending models for libraries?
AJ: I think there are two things that predispose me to being a fan of ebook lending  in libraries. The first is that I’m, as I said earlier, an avid reader. So I definitely often see things with a reader and consumer’s viewpoint, even while understanding and evaluating from the publisher point of view.
The second is that I’ve been in digital publishing for a decade, so I’ve seen the growth of the industry and seen up close the readership changes. Both of these things make me a fan of libraries as well as a consumer of ebook lending via libraries myself.
ES: Finally, do you have any advice for publishers who are considering licensing their ebooks to libraries?
AJ: I wouldn’t presume to tell another publisher how to do business, so no true advice. Instead, I’ll say that being open to library lending has been advantageous for us in building relationships with the libraries, with authors (and for authors to build relationships with libraries) and with readers. 

LJ memoir columnist and star Tumblarian, Erin “Laser Fingers" Shea talks to Angela James, editor of Harlequin’s e-only imprint, Carina Press.

    cloudunbound:

    I’ve spent a goodly amount of February shining a giant pink light on Cloud partner Harlequin (see my overview of its series, Harlequin’s quick-and-dirty guide to erotica, and Cloud librarian Maureen Roberts’s interview with KISS author Kelly Hunter). Before the month of love and eros slips away, romance fans and publishing pundits of all platforms should, if they haven’t already, meet Angela James, executive editor of Harlequin’s digital-first, DRM-free imprint, Carina Press

    Below is Cloud librarian Erin Shea’s scintillating email conversation with James (pictured above, with e-reader in hand), who lives and dies by her intimate, enviable connection with the romance audience. She’s also a believer in the library as discovery center and holds forth with ten years of digital publishing experience on the relationship among word of mouth, digital marketing, libraries, and sales.

    ES: Carina Press is a “digital-first, DRM free” imprint of Harlequin. Would you explain what this means for library users downloading your ebooks?

    AJ: This actually means very positive things for library users, because Carina Press has chosen not to put DRM, or Digital Rights Management, on our titles, including those bought by libraries. This means library users can easily move the files they check out from the library to their device of choice. I have had a number of librarians tell me that, because of this, they often use Carina Press titles to demonstrate to patrons how to move files to a device, because we make it quite painless.

    ES: Your imprint primarily publishes genre fiction. Do you think genre fans consume their reading in a way that makes a DRM-free business model more sustainable than, say, nonfiction?

    AJ: I don’t consider myself an expert on the nonfiction market or its consumers, so it’s difficult to answer this question with any confidence. Anecdotally, I’ve heard many nonfiction publishers, especially textbook publishers, say DRM free is a nonstarter in their part of the industry. On the other hand, I’ve also heard fiction publishers say that.

    On the fiction side, I think some of the hesitation from publishers comes not just from the publishers and their concerns with reader usage of DRM-free material, but also from the pressure they get from some authors and agents to continue the use of DRM because of their concerns with reader usage.

    ES: Carina Press caters to niche and emerging reader markets. Do you worry about customers finishing a title and then passing it on digitally to a friend for free? Or do you see this as a way to build word of mouth?

    AJ: Yes, I do see it as a way to build word of mouth. I’m going to use myself as an example. I’m an avid reader; in 2012, I read between 410-420 books. In short, I’m a publisher’s dream come true! But despite the fact that I’m willing to spend several thousand dollars a year on books, I still encounter many that I’d like to read but am hesitant to purchase because I’m uncertain of the author’s writing ability, storytelling ability, or whether I can trust her or him with plot elements.

    Being able to get the book from a friend (or a library!) allows me to experiment with authors, stories, and even genres I wouldn’t otherwise try. Because of the wide availability of books to choose from, if borrowing the book by some legitimate means isn’t available to me, I simply skip it. However, if I am able to borrow it, and enjoy it, I am willing in the future to become a paying customer of that author. If the author has a preexisting backlist, I’ll invest in the backlist.

    I don’t think I’m that unique in this regard (perhaps unique in how much I read but not unique in wanting to be cautious of where I choose to spend my reading dollars).

    ES: Ebook discovery is a hot topic in Library Land. Browsing a digital collection is an inherently different experience than perusing a physical bookshelf. Because of this, librarians are constantly thinking about how they can streamline ebook discovery. How do you market your digital-first titles to new audiences?

    AJ: In many ways, digital-first marketing is much the same as marketing print. We advertise in key online places, as well as experiment with niche online places. We do etailer co-ops, seek out reviews, send newsletters, engage with our audience in social media channels, etc. But with the rise of digital and the rise of the reader also being online, we’re seeing how important word of mouth along with the right pricing strategy is. But if a title can generate excellent word of mouth, that’s the most valuable marketing! 

    ES: Would you be open to a library purchasing Carina Press ebooks and then assigning their own in-house DRM to those titles?

    AJ: You know, that’s something no one has ever asked me before. It’s a larger business decision, so we’d definitely be open to a discussion on the pros and cons of this. It would be a fascinating discussion!

    ES: You are a self-proclaimed advocate for digital publishing; how does your point of view influence your stance on ebook lending models for libraries?

    AJ: I think there are two things that predispose me to being a fan of ebook lending  in libraries. The first is that I’m, as I said earlier, an avid reader. So I definitely often see things with a reader and consumer’s viewpoint, even while understanding and evaluating from the publisher point of view.

    The second is that I’ve been in digital publishing for a decade, so I’ve seen the growth of the industry and seen up close the readership changes. Both of these things make me a fan of libraries as well as a consumer of ebook lending via libraries myself.

    ES: Finally, do you have any advice for publishers who are considering licensing their ebooks to libraries?

    AJ: I wouldn’t presume to tell another publisher how to do business, so no true advice. Instead, I’ll say that being open to library lending has been advantageous for us in building relationships with the libraries, with authors (and for authors to build relationships with libraries) and with readers. 

    LJ memoir columnist and star Tumblarian, Erin “Laser Fingers" Shea talks to Angela James, editor of Harlequin’s e-only imprint, Carina Press.

  7. I’d do anything for the library,” Ford said before his talk and book signing, which was organized by Barrett Bookstore. “I was a kid raised in the library in Mississippi.” He added, “It’s a social center. It’s a place where kids can come after school and be safe. It’s a place where thoughts can actually happen without the overseeing of the `thought police.’

    — 

    Darien Library audience enamored by Pulitzer Prize winner - Darien News

    Richard Ford, entertaining our patrons and tearing down the dreaded Thought Police!

    (via darienlibrary)

  8. darienlibrary:

    Happy Holidays from Darien Library! Here’s a mid-afternoon pick-me-up from our staff to you.

    I only have my eyes on one person:

    <3 <3 SWOON <3 <3

  9. darienlibrary:

One of my favorite things to do on Instagram is search for photos teens have taken in the Library and then creepily comment on them.

Current favorite use of social media by libraries yet.

    darienlibrary:

    One of my favorite things to do on Instagram is search for photos teens have taken in the Library and then creepily comment on them.

    Current favorite use of social media by libraries yet.

  10. darienlibrary:

    I am very proud to present…Darien Library staff members GANGNAM STYLE.

    While I am shocked and disappointed that Erin Shea did not appear in this video, I am equally surprised and pleased at just how well this Darien Library take on Gangnam Style turned out.

  11. librarianwardrobe:

Head of Adult Programming
Public Library
Connecticut
I would also like to add that I was parked when I took this picture and the earrings were a gift. Yes I know they’re fly as hell.

Another tumblrarian who is very close to my heart. (And whose earring are indeed fly as hell.)

    librarianwardrobe:

    • Head of Adult Programming
    • Public Library
    • Connecticut

    I would also like to add that I was parked when I took this picture and the earrings were a gift. Yes I know they’re fly as hell.

    Another tumblrarian who is very close to my heart. (And whose earring are indeed fly as hell.)

  12. darienlibrary:

    Here are just a couple photos from our Darien Community Hurricane Potluck. It was a delicious success. Check out the rest of the photos on our flickr stream.

  13. Darien Library: Tumblrarians! Aspiring tumblrarians! Librarians on tumblr who do not yet identify as tumblrarians! →

    darienlibrary:

    Racheland I are leading a webinar Wednesday, November 14 from 3-4 PM EST entitled “Using Tumblr to Support Library Programming.”

    You do not need to be a member of ALA to register, although you will need to create a log in. You can doso here. Scroll down to November 14, 2012.

    Things you will bear witness to if you register for our webinar:

    1. Lots of screenshots that include some of YOUR tumblrs. So you may want to register just to hear what we say about you behind your back.

    2. Awesome stock photos that I found by searching Microsoft Word using the term “business.”

    3. Helpful tips whether you’re already a tumblr user or a total newbie.

    4. Lots of alliterations, anecdotes, and animated .gifs.

    All I can say is YES.

  14. darienlibrary:

My first book review in Library Journal.
My real reason for posting this is to say that now I can officially take Molly out for margaritas and tell people I’m having drinks “with my editor.”

I was thinking about posting this song in response but instead I will say, 1) there are few things as wonderful as the fancy language Erin and I can now use about our friendship, and 2) YOU, TOO, CAN REVIEW FOR LJ. (Email me!)

    darienlibrary:

    My first book review in Library Journal.

    My real reason for posting this is to say that now I can officially take Molly out for margaritas and tell people I’m having drinks “with my editor.”

    I was thinking about posting this song in response but instead I will say, 1) there are few things as wonderful as the fancy language Erin and I can now use about our friendship, and 2) YOU, TOO, CAN REVIEW FOR LJ. (Email me!)

  15. Erin the Programming Librarian

    thecardiganlibrarian:

    Erin lives it up with library-themed trompe l’oeil.

    1. Can you tell us about your position?

    I am the Head of Adult Programming for a public library in Connecticut. This means I coordinate author events, music concerts, film screenings, technology classes, and workshops for adults. Because our library has a relatively small amount of full-time staff, I have my hand in a lot of different pots at all times.

    Read More

    Ladies and gentleman, may I introduce my fiance (she popped the question over Twitter yesterday) Erin Shea.