1. Weaponized Procrastination: DIY Radicalism Requires Risk →

    chrischelberg:

    I feel that if there is no real risk in what you’re doing, it can’t be DIY. To overcome the obstacles that we face, we need to really do it ourselves. Journal costs too high? Focus on open access institutional repositories, then federate search. Worried about patron privacy with specific vendor software? Contribute to the development of an open source alternative that manages privacy the way it should and refuse to use or integrate with systems that won’t let us. Ebooks not available? Either roll out our own, or test the copyright law itself. Give out the books without DRM! We’ve not tried it yet, but wouldn’t that simplify things greatly if we could? We act for the public good, or at least we should. There is a level of radicalism in the amount of DIY-ness that we could do, but aren’t. But if we don’t force change, together or separately, we’ll lose what all our collaborations and associations have been able to carve out so far.

    Over at his Tumblr, Chris Chelberg meditates on what it means to be and do DIY in libraries today.

  2. Library Journal featured our DIY History page →

    uispeccoll:

    “Cooking Up a Crowdsourced Digitization Project that Scales” by Meredith Schwartz

  3. chicagopubliclibrary:

Closet Transformed Into A Book Nook

Excuse me while I fan myself.

    chicagopubliclibrary:

    Closet Transformed Into A Book Nook

    Excuse me while I fan myself.

  4. Library Journal featured our DIY History page →

    uispeccoll:

    “Cooking Up a Crowdsourced Digitization Project that Scales” by Meredith Schwartz

    Holla!

  5. From LJ, Indianapolis Microlibrary Is on the Move:

    Indianapolis’s first mobile microlibrary, which held its grand opening August 18, is already growing. The 8’x10’ wood hutch and trailer, dubbed “The Cottage” for its location in the eastside neighborhood of the same name, houses hundreds of lendable titles, and is ready to fill more shelves.

    The Cottage is open all the time, run by written record and the honor system. According to Northenscold, who helps maintain the upkeep, it’s okay if some books don’t get returned. “Lost is the wrong word,” she said. “Some books will be with new owners, and more books in people’s hands is never a bad thing.”

  6. Book Deal of the Day:

    rachelfershleiser:

    “New York Public Library Rare Books Librarian Jessica Pigza’s HANDMADE AT THE LIBRARY, in which readers will learn how to use the riches of libraries, both online and off, to inspire all manner of craft/design/DIY endeavors…”

    YES YES YES YES YES YES YES!