1. mydaguerreotypelibrarian:

    Edward Christopher Williams (1871 – 1929) was the first African-American professional librarian in the United States of America. His sudden death in 1929 ended his career the year he was expected to receive the first Ph.D. in librarianship.

    Upon his graduation with distinction from Adelbert College of Western Reserve University in 1892, he was appointed Assistant Librarian of Hatch Library at WRU. Two years later, he was promoted to librarian of Hatch Library until 1909, when he resigned to assume the responsibility of the Principal of M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C. He continued his career as University Librarian of Howard University until his death on December 24, 1929.

    He is also author of the novel When Washington Was in Vogue.

    Holla library history / DC history twofer.

  2. As longtime readers know, this time of year we here at GLW get hard at work to help librarian Melissa Jackson at Ballou Sr High School in Washington DC fill her school’s shelves. From our previous efforts, starting in 2011, we have helped Ballou move from a library that had less than one book for each of its 1,185 students to a ratio now of FIVE books per student. While this is all kinds of wonderful and something we are quite proud to be part of, the American Library Association advocates eleven books for each student. Ballou is still operating at a serious literary deficit and so we are staying with them until they are busting that minimum standard and knee deep in all the reading these students could ever want or need.

    — What’s that? You think that donating books to an amazing library seems like the ideal way to celebrate National Library Week? You’re a genius! Might I suggest Guys Lit Wire and their annual book fair for Ballou Library? (via bookavore)

  3. Washingtonians, it’s time to ‘Know Your Neighborhood’ - The Root DC Live | The Washington Post

The task sounds easy enough: Know your neighborhood. But in a city with rapidly changing demographics, that isn’t easy anymore, if not impossible. One of the parroted beliefs of the anti-gentrification crowdis that when people move to the District, they make no effort to learn about the history of the city.
Judging from what I saw last week at the Mount Pleasant Neighborhood Library, that’s just not true. At the presentation, “The Rise and Fall and Rise of Columbia Heights: A lecture by Brian Kraft,” interest was overflowing in the room. Literally.
More than 125 people packed the small meeting room to hear Kraft, a hobby historian, discuss the history of the now-popular, hipster-laden neighborhood. And while many were self-selecting history buffs, there was clearly a thirst for knowledge of the basic roots of the community where they lived. Some even brought their kids.

For this presentation, you can thank a non-D.C. native. Ana Elisa de Campos Salles, an adult and teen librarian at the recently renovated branch at 3160 16th St. NW, who thought of the idea while at an interim facility on Mount Pleasant Street, around the corner.
Originally from Brazil, she wanted to find a way to welcome the community to the new facility. “Sort of as a welcome-back love letter to the neighborhood,” she said.

    Washingtonians, it’s time to ‘Know Your Neighborhood’ - The Root DC Live | The Washington Post

    The task sounds easy enough: Know your neighborhood. But in a city with rapidly changing demographics, that isn’t easy anymore, if not impossible. One of the parroted beliefs of the anti-gentrification crowdis that when people move to the District, they make no effort to learn about the history of the city.

    Judging from what I saw last week at the Mount Pleasant Neighborhood Library, that’s just not true. At the presentation, “The Rise and Fall and Rise of Columbia Heights: A lecture by Brian Kraft,” interest was overflowing in the room. Literally.

    More than 125 people packed the small meeting room to hear Kraft, a hobby historian, discuss the history of the now-popular, hipster-laden neighborhood. And while many were self-selecting history buffs, there was clearly a thirst for knowledge of the basic roots of the community where they lived. Some even brought their kids.

    For this presentation, you can thank a non-D.C. native. Ana Elisa de Campos Salles, an adult and teen librarian at the recently renovated branch at 3160 16th St. NW, who thought of the idea while at an interim facility on Mount Pleasant Street, around the corner.

    Originally from Brazil, she wanted to find a way to welcome the community to the new facility. “Sort of as a welcome-back love letter to the neighborhood,” she said.

  4. thepinakes:

Summer 2013 Professional Development Internship Projects | Smithsonian Libraries
MLIS students of the east coast — applications are being accepted for an excellent array of internships with the Smithsonian, with opportunities to work in the special collections of their art museums, on a Chinese book cataloging project, a sheet music project, the Biodiversity Heritage Library, and more.
Applications are due by mid-March. Go forth and apply!

    thepinakes:

    Summer 2013 Professional Development Internship Projects | Smithsonian Libraries

    MLIS students of the east coast — applications are being accepted for an excellent array of internships with the Smithsonian, with opportunities to work in the special collections of their art museums, on a Chinese book cataloging project, a sheet music project, the Biodiversity Heritage Library, and more.

    Applications are due by mid-March. Go forth and apply!

  5. themodernistwitch:

From the Arlington Co. Library’s Flickr set of ’80s DC punk flyers.

    themodernistwitch:

    From the Arlington Co. Library’s Flickr set of ’80s DC punk flyers.

  6. Also from the Rumpus:

    Inspired by last year’s video by Melissa Jackson, librarian at Ballou Senior High School in Washington DC, Guys Lit Wire held two book fairs that helped Ballou move from having a library with “less than one book for each of its 1,200 students at the beginning of 2011 to a ratio now of two books per student.”

    Hoping to further decrease the school’s “literary deficit,” GLW is kicking off another book fair. Check out how to go about purchasing books off their wish list.

  7. D.C. School Librarians Face An Uncertain Future →

    Still, she says parental involvement can’t replace the work of a librarian. “A librarian can turn a hesitant reader into an avid reader,” she says.

    Plus, Carl Harvey, president of the American Association of School Librarians, says running a library is about much more than books these days.

    “School libraries teach the process of how you deal with information, how you find it, how you evaluate it and what you do with information,” he says. “As we all know, with the Internet, information is exploding everywhere and kids are really going to need skills and processes to deal with that information.”

  8. Yesterday, an eight-person panel convened by the Urban Land Institute started a week-long process to help figure out what to do with a building that has split opinion among District officials and residents for years — the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library.

    The problem? None of the people that might decide the iconic building’s fate are District residents.

    Late last week, the D.C. Library Renaissance Project issued a press release noting that the eight members of the panel were all out-of-towners, with five being from California, and the closest from Richmond.

    The implications are obvious — the District is removing residents from a heated debate over what should happen with the library, which sits in a renowned building that has suffered from persistent maintenance issues. (Some people love the building, others hate it.)

    — From DCist, Non-Residents to Help Decide Future of MLK Library