1. schoollibraryjournal:

It’s taken blood, sweat, and tears, but this Wednesday, November 28 at 6 pm ET SLJ will reveal our best books of 2012. Hashtag: #sljbestbooks
(Image via tölvakonu)

SLJ will be revealing their best books of 2012 on Twitter tomorrow! Keep an eye out! 

    schoollibraryjournal:

    It’s taken blood, sweat, and tears, but this Wednesday, November 28 at 6 pm ET SLJ will reveal our best books of 2012. Hashtag: #sljbestbooks

    (Image via tölvakonu)

    SLJ will be revealing their best books of 2012 on Twitter tomorrow! Keep an eye out! 

  2. cloundunbound:

NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS VS. THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE: Awards are taking up a lot of mental real estate these days. Library Journal’s editors, headed by Etta Thornton-Verma (@ettathornton), announced last week that they have settled on their Best Books short lists and will publish the first installment, including the Top Ten, in the LJ Reviews e-newsletter on November 15 (2011 winners here). LJ Assistant Editor Molly McArdle (@mollitudo) tweeted, “Of our 19-book shortlist, 12 titles are by women, 10 are nonfiction, and 3 first appeared on the Internet in some form.”
My Giller post today reminded me of a recent Twitter conversation I had with two librarians, Stephanie Chase and Amy Watts, about the sales impact of the NBAs and the Bookers, a topic begging for a meaty post. Takers apply here.

Former (& in our hearts, eternal) Editor, LJ Book Review, Heather McCormack chews on some observations from librarians on the importance of literary awards.

    cloundunbound:

    NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS VS. THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE: Awards are taking up a lot of mental real estate these days. Library Journal’s editors, headed by Etta Thornton-Verma (@ettathornton), announced last week that they have settled on their Best Books short lists and will publish the first installment, including the Top Ten, in the LJ Reviews e-newsletter on November 15 (2011 winners here). LJ Assistant Editor Molly McArdle (@mollitudo) tweeted, “Of our 19-book shortlist, 12 titles are by women, 10 are nonfiction, and 3 first appeared on the Internet in some form.”

    My Giller post today reminded me of a recent Twitter conversation I had with two librarians, Stephanie Chase and Amy Watts, about the sales impact of the NBAs and the Bookers, a topic begging for a meaty post. Takers apply here.

    Former (& in our hearts, eternal) Editor, LJ Book Review, Heather McCormack chews on some observations from librarians on the importance of literary awards.