1. A Library Where the Hush Is Over Its Very Existence →

    jefflambert:

    image

    This is the entrance to the City Hall Library, open to all yet known to relatively few and visible to just about no one. “I didn’t even know this was here. Is it open to the public?” Ydanis Rodriguez, a City Council member from Manhattan, asked as he recently entered it for the first time, even though it is a short walk from his offices.

    Relative obscurity is nothing new for this institution, which is actually housed inside the Surrogate’s Court building. It is over 100 years old, but in July 1898, The New York Times wrote of its predecessor, a hodgepodge of a library inside City Hall, “There are not many who know of its existence, and few who have heard of it know of its location.” An apt description for the current library, too.

    Seems silly that a landmark designation is standing in the way of even the most basic signage. Access is a right!

    I am pro-clear signage and pro-awesome websites.

  2. chicagopubliclibrary:

Closet Transformed Into A Book Nook

Excuse me while I fan myself.

    chicagopubliclibrary:

    Closet Transformed Into A Book Nook

    Excuse me while I fan myself.

  3. myimaginarybrooklyn:

“Interior view of the Pratt Institute Library, showing students browsing in the stacks. The Pratt Institute Library was built as a public as well as a college library, and was the first free Library in New York City. It was built by architect William B. Tubby in Victorian Renaissance revival style, with interiors by the Tiffany Decorating Company; the Romanesque-style Children’s Portico was added to the children’s entrance in 1912; the north porch was added in 1936 by John Mead Howells.”

    myimaginarybrooklyn:

    “Interior view of the Pratt Institute Library, showing students browsing in the stacks. The Pratt Institute Library was built as a public as well as a college library, and was the first free Library in New York City. It was built by architect William B. Tubby in Victorian Renaissance revival style, with interiors by the Tiffany Decorating Company; the Romanesque-style Children’s Portico was added to the children’s entrance in 1912; the north porch was added in 1936 by John Mead Howells.”

  4. A beautiful new library designed by David Adjaye opened in Southeast DC last week. The Francis A. Gregory Library has space for 80,000 books, DVDs, CDs and other materials. Read more from the Washington Post.

    A beautiful new library designed by David Adjaye opened in Southeast DC last week. The Francis A. Gregory Library has space for 80,000 books, DVDs, CDs and other materials. Read more from the Washington Post.

  5. New Orleans libraries turn over a new leaf with state-of-the-art buildings

For some New Orleanians, the story of the post-Katrina public library system’s resurrection might read like a never-ending tale. While officials managed to reopen five of the 13 storm-damaged locations quickly, many neighborhoods have been forced to rely on makeshift mini-libraries housed in trailers, bookmobiles, elementary schools and abandoned retail spaces, including a former video rental store on North Carrollton Avenue.
But the long wait for many book lovers in hard-hit areas is about to end as City Hall prepares to cut the ribbons on five new state-of-the-art libraries over the next few months, including three in rapid-fire succession beginning this week.

    New Orleans libraries turn over a new leaf with state-of-the-art buildings

    For some New Orleanians, the story of the post-Katrina public library system’s resurrection might read like a never-ending tale. While officials managed to reopen five of the 13 storm-damaged locations quickly, many neighborhoods have been forced to rely on makeshift mini-libraries housed in trailers, bookmobiles, elementary schools and abandoned retail spaces, including a former video rental store on North Carrollton Avenue.

    But the long wait for many book lovers in hard-hit areas is about to end as City Hall prepares to cut the ribbons on five new state-of-the-art libraries over the next few months, including three in rapid-fire succession beginning this week.

  6. Just look at this. Isn’t it beautiful? Check out LJ’s lovely new Year in Architecture feature here.

    Just look at this. Isn’t it beautiful? Check out LJ’s lovely new Year in Architecture feature here.

  7. Yesterday, an eight-person panel convened by the Urban Land Institute started a week-long process to help figure out what to do with a building that has split opinion among District officials and residents for years — the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library.

    The problem? None of the people that might decide the iconic building’s fate are District residents.

    Late last week, the D.C. Library Renaissance Project issued a press release noting that the eight members of the panel were all out-of-towners, with five being from California, and the closest from Richmond.

    The implications are obvious — the District is removing residents from a heated debate over what should happen with the library, which sits in a renowned building that has suffered from persistent maintenance issues. (Some people love the building, others hate it.)

    — From DCist, Non-Residents to Help Decide Future of MLK Library